9780262024754

Knowledge and Mind : A Philosophical Introduction

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780262024754

  • ISBN10:

    0262024756

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2000-04-03
  • Publisher: Bradford Books
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Summary

This is the only contemporary text to cover both epistemology and philosophy of mind at an introductory level. It also serves as a general introduction to philosophy: it discusses the nature and methods of philosophy as well as basic logical tools of the trade. The book is divided into three parts. The first focuses on knowledge, in particular, skepticism and knowledge of the external world, and knowledge of language. The second focuses on mind, including the metaphysics of mind and freedom of will. The third brings together knowledge and mind, discussing knowledge of mind (other minds and our own) and naturalism and how epistemology and philosophy of mind come together in contemporary cognitive science. Throughout, the authors take into account the needs of the beginning philosophy student. They have made very effort to ensure accessibility while preserving accuracy.

Author Biography

Andrew Brook is Professor of Philosophy, Director of Interdisciplinary Studies, and Chair of the Cognitive Science Program at Carleton University, Ottawa Robert J. Stainton is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Linguistics at Carleton University

Table of Contents

Preface for Instructors ix
Acknowledgments xiii
Introduction to Philosophy, Knowledge, and Mind
1(12)
Epistemology
1(2)
Philosophy of Mind
3(2)
Epilogue: Arguments, Philosophical and Otherwise
5(8)
Study Questions
11(1)
Suggested Further Readings
11(2)
PART I Knowledge 13(48)
Knowing the External World
15(18)
A Skeptical Argument
15(5)
Objections to External-World Skepticism and Replies
20(9)
Epilogue: The Gettier ``Paradox'' and Knowledge as Justified True Belief
29(4)
Study Questions
31(1)
Suggested Further Readings
31(2)
Knowledge of Language
33(28)
The Nature of Linguistic Knowledge
33(9)
The Acquisition of Linguistic Knowledge
42(7)
Language and Thought
49(5)
A Universal Language of Thought (LOT)?
54(2)
Epilogue to Part I: The Nature and Methods of Philosophy
56(5)
Study Questions
59(1)
Suggested Further Readings
60(1)
PART II Mind 61(102)
Mind and Body: The Metaphysics of Mind
63(40)
Introduction: Conflicting Visions of the Mind
63(10)
What Makes Something Mental?
73(6)
A Wealth of Positions
79(24)
Study Questions
100(1)
Suggested Further Readings
100(3)
Mind and Body: What Should We Believe?
103(32)
Why Has Dualism Has Such a Strong Appeal?
103(5)
Four Arguments for Dualism
108(3)
Assessment of the Arguments
111(6)
What Should We Believe?
117(3)
Is the Mind Fundamentally a Symbol Processor?
120(3)
Do We Need to Study the Brain?
123(1)
Why Isn't Functionalism Just Good Old Dualism in New Clothes?
124(2)
Immortality Again: Can We Look Forward to Life after Death?
126(9)
Study Questions
133(1)
Suggested Further Readings
133(2)
Free Choice
135(28)
A Preliminary Definition
136(1)
Why Freedom of Choice Matters
136(3)
Freedom of Decision and Freedom of Action
139(2)
Positions and Distinctions
141(4)
The Compatibilist Challenge
145(1)
Compatibilists on Free Choice
146(4)
Implications of Compatibilism
150(2)
First Objection: The Joys of Modality
152(3)
Second Objection: Doesn't Compatibilism Leave Something Important Out?
155(5)
Final Remarks
160(3)
Study Questions
161(1)
Suggested Further Readings
162(1)
PART III Relating Knowledge to Mind 163(56)
Knowledge of Minds
165(24)
Introduction
165(1)
The Problem of Other Minds
165(3)
The Problem of Knowledge of Self
168(2)
Weak, Stronger, and Strongest Skepticism about Other Minds
170(3)
Responses to the Problem
173(1)
There Is a Problem: The Argument from Analogy Is the Solution
174(3)
There Is a Problem: Underlying Neurological Similarity Is the Solution
177(1)
There Is No Problem: Identity Theory, Behaviorism, Wittgensteinianism
178(3)
There Is a Problem: Inference to the Best Explanation Is the Solution
181(3)
The Problem of Knowledge of Self
184(2)
Conclusion
186(3)
Study Questions
186(1)
Suggested Further Readings
187(2)
A New Approach to Knowledge and Mind
189(30)
Naturalizing Philosophy: How Philosophy Relates to Science
191(4)
Naturalizing Epistemology
195(5)
Naturalizing the Mind
200(7)
Naturalizing Knowledge of Other Minds: The Problem in Robots
207(6)
Philosophy and Naturalism
213(3)
Conclusion
216(3)
Study Questions
217(1)
Suggested Further Readings
218(1)
Notes 219(10)
Glossary 229(10)
References 239(8)
Index 247

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