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Labor Relations

by ;
Edition:
11th
ISBN13:

9780131006829

ISBN10:
0131006827
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $160.00
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Summary

"Labor Relations," the most accurate, readable, timely, and valuable book of its kind on the market, provides readers with a basic understanding of unionism in its natural habitat and a fundamental appreciation of the union-management process. It focuses on the negotiation and administration of labor agreements, and emphasizes the more significant bargaining issues. The 11th edition includes much new material and an extensively revised and updated bibliography. For vice-presidents and directors of labor relations, union presidents, and others who are full-time labor-management professionals for either managements or unions.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
PART I: SETTING THE STAGE
1(44)
Organized Labor and the Management Community: An Overview
1(44)
The Staying Power of Unions
3(1)
The State of the Unions Today
3(4)
White-Collar Employees
7(4)
Some Probable Explanations
11(4)
Some Grounds for Union Optimism
15(3)
Labor's Present Strategic Power
18(1)
Why Workers Join Unions
19(6)
Why Managers Resist Unions
25(3)
Labor Relations Consultants
28(1)
Labor Relations in the Public Sector
29(2)
The Growth of Public-Sector Unionism: Some Explanations
31(3)
The Public-Employee Unionist: The Strike Issue
34(4)
Public Employees and Harder Times
38(1)
Some Concluding Thoughts
39(2)
Minicases
The White-Collar Union Organizer
41(1)
An Overture from a Business Agent
41(4)
PART II: THE ENVIRONMENTAL FRAMEWORK
45(132)
The Historical Framework
45(34)
The Eighteenth Century: Genesis of the American Labor Movement
49(1)
The First Unions and Their Limited Successes
50(1)
Revival, Innovation, and Disillusionment
51(1)
The Laying of the Foundation for Modern Unionism and Some Mixed Performances
51(2)
The Rise and Fall of the Knights of Labor
53(1)
The Formation of the AFL and Its Pragmatic Master Plan
54(4)
The Early Years of the AFL and Some Mixed Results
58(2)
Wartime Gains and Peacetime Losses
60(1)
The Great Depression and the AFL's Resurgence in Spite of Itself
61(3)
The CIO's Challenge to the AFL
64(3)
World War II
67(2)
Public Reaction and Private Merger
69(1)
Organized Labor Since the Merger
70(5)
Some Concluding Thoughts
75(1)
Minicases
The Frustrated Labor Historian
76(1)
A Vote of No Confidence
76(3)
The Legal Framework
79(47)
The Era of Judicial Control
80(1)
The Norris-La Guardia Act of 1932
81(1)
The Wagner Act of 1935
82(11)
From the Wagner Act to Taft-Hartley
93(1)
The Taft-Hartley Act of 1947
93(18)
The Landrum-Griffin Act of 1959
111(3)
Public Policy in Recent Years
114(5)
Permanent Replacements for Strikers: Another Worry for Labor
119(2)
Some Concluding Thoughts
121(3)
Minicases
A Question of Definition
124(1)
Alleged Union Paranoia
124(2)
Union Behavior: Structure, Government, and Operation
126(51)
The AFL-CIO
127(12)
The National Union
139(24)
The Local Union
163(9)
Union Finances
172(2)
Some Concluding Thoughts
174(1)
Minicases
The Independent International
175(1)
Qualifications for Union Office
175(2)
PART III: COLLECTIVE BARGAINING
177(254)
At the Bargaining Table
177(42)
Preparation for Negotiations
179(12)
The Bargaining Process: Early Stages
191(2)
The Bargaining Process: Later Stages
193(4)
The Bargaining Process: Final Stages
197(2)
Crisis Situations
199(4)
Testing and Proofreading
203(1)
Coordinated Bargaining and Multinationals
204(2)
Boulwarism: A Different Way of Doing Things
206(1)
Some Further Complexities
207(9)
Some Concluding Thoughts
216(1)
Minicases
Trying to Strike a Balance
217(1)
An Advocate of Boulwarism
217(2)
Grievances and Arbitration
219(39)
Grievance Procedure
220(4)
Grievance Procedure: Its Flexibility
224(1)
Arbitration
225(2)
The Trilogy Cases
227(18)
Arbitration Costs and Time Lag
245(4)
Some Concluding Thoughts
249(1)
Minicases
A Dissenting View Regarding Arbitration
250(1)
An Embarrassing Incident for the Arbitrator
250(1)
Arbitration Cases
Case 1 Arbitrability: The Case of the Dropped and Reinstituted Grievance
251(3)
Case 2 Past Practice: The Case of Overtime Allocation That the Union Viewed as Inequitable
254(4)
Wage Issues under Collective Bargaining
258(36)
Determination of the Basic Wage Rate
259(8)
Cost of Living: Escalator and Wage-Reopener Arrangements
267(6)
Wage Differentials
273(1)
Overtime and Flextime
274(6)
Job Evaluation and Job Comparison
280(2)
Concessionary Bargaining
282(3)
Two-Tier Wage Systems
285(1)
Some Concluding Thoughts
286(1)
Minicases
Dispensation
287(1)
An Employee Refusal to Work Overtime
288(1)
Arbitration Cases
Case 3 Mandatory Overtime: The Case of the Periodic Inventory
289(5)
Economic Supplements under Collective Bargaining
294(35)
Pension and Retirement Plans
296(5)
Tax-Deferred Retirement Savings Plans
301(2)
Vacation with Pay
303(2)
Holidays with Pay
305(2)
Negotiated-Health Insurance Plans
307(3)
Dismissal Pay
310(1)
Reporting Pay
310(2)
Supplementary Unemployment Benefit Plans
312(2)
Some Concluding Thoughts
314(4)
Minicases
The Case of Henry Jennings
318(1)
The Case of Timmy Aldrich
318(1)
Case 4 Sick Pay: The Case of the Union Meeting Attendance
319(3)
Case 5 Life Insurance: The Case of the Life-Support System
322(7)
Institutional Issues under Collective Bargaining
329(33)
Union Membership as a Condition of Employment
330(1)
Forms of Union Security
330(7)
The Checkoff
337(1)
Union Obligations
338(4)
Managerial Prerogatives
342(4)
Codetermination and Unions in the Boardroom
346(2)
Employee Stock Ownership Plans
348(3)
Quality of Work Life Programs
351(5)
Some Concluding Thoughts
356(1)
Minicases
A Question of Freedom
357(1)
An Original Proposal
357(1)
Management Rights
358(1)
Case 6 Management Rights: The Case of Filling a Vacancy
359(3)
Administrative Issues under Collective Bargaining
362(69)
Seniority
363(11)
Discharge and Discipline
374(5)
Safety and Health of Employees
379(8)
Production Standards and Staffing
387(7)
Technological Change
394(14)
Plant Closings
408(1)
Some Concluding Thoughts
409(1)
Minicases
The Dangerous Knife
410(1)
Vocal Criticism by an Employee
410(2)
Case 7 Seniority: The Case of the Temporary Assignments
412(4)
Case 8 Employee Discipline: The Case of the Jailed Employee Who Carried a Loaded Handgun and Suspected Cocaine in Her Purse
416(4)
Case 9 Employee Discipline: The Case of the Permission to Leave the Plant
420(3)
Case 10 Employee Discipline: The Case of the Fighting on the Employer's Premises
423(8)
Appendix: Mock Negotiation Problem 431(6)
Glossary 437(8)
Index 445

Excerpts

There are no prerequisites to this book beyond an interest in labor-management relations. It has been designed to serve as an aid to all readers--whether undergraduate students, graduate students, or practitioners--who desire a basic understanding of unionism in its natural habitat. With such a thrust, however, the volume focuses on certain areas, necessarily minimizing the treatment of others. Labor Relationsbrings in, for example, sufficient economic material to allow a fundamental appreciation of the union-management process and stops at that point. Throughout, it has tried to make the various topic treatments short enough to be interesting while at the same time long enough to do justice to the subject. On the other hand, it in no way restricts itself to what is commonly described as collective bargaining. Its focus is on the negotiation and administration of labor agreements, with emphasis on the more significant bargaining issues as they now appear between the covers of the contracts. And these topics cannot profitably be studied in isolation. Labor relations can best be viewed as an interaction between two organizations--management and the labor union--and the parties to this interaction are always subject to various, often complex, environmental influences. Only after the reader gains an understanding of the evolving management and labor institutions, and only after the environment surrounding their interactional process has been appreciated, can he or she attempt to understand bargaining itself in any satisfactory way. The book consequently begins with a broad overview of the general nature of the labor-management relationship as it currently exists in the United States (Part I). It then moves to a survey of the historical, legal, and structural environments that so greatly influence contractual contents and labor relations behavior (Part II). Finally, it presents a close examination of the negotiation, administration, and major contents of the labor agreement itself (Part III). Through description, analysis, discussion questions, minicases (many of them with ethical dimensions) and selected arbitration cases drawn from the authors' own experiences, understanding of all these aspects of labor relations will, hopefully, be imparted. This eleventh edition, the second one written since Fred Witney's 1999 death, is marked by many changes. These are mainly additions, although all of the chapters have been given some streamlining and the new volume is essentially the same in size as its predecessors. Even in the three years since the tenth edition, developments in the field have called for the inclusion of new material on such topics as labor's increased emphasis on both organizing the unorganized and political action, George W. Bush and labor, unions and cyberspace, the remuneration of labor leaders, the U.S. Supreme Court and labor arbitration, collective bargaining in major league sports, and a host of other subjects. I have also enlarged upon the book's prior treatment of white collar unionism, unions and public opinion, union finances, national emergency strikes, and the merger of AFL-CIO affiliates, to cite only a few other recipients of greater journalistic attention. And the discussion of many additional topics has, of course, been given a significant updating. A multitude of new visual aids are included also, as are several new arbitration cases, an extensively revised bibliography, an amended mock negotiation problem, and quite a few added discussion questions. Nonetheless, I have exercised self-restraint in the rewriting. Only changes that can be defended on the grounds of general improvement ofLabor Relationshave been incorporated. I have always firmly believed in the old Puritan dictum that "nothing should ever be said that doesn't improve upon silence," and also share with the late Calvin Coolidge the conviction that "if you d


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