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Laboratory Studies in Animal Diversity

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780073260983

ISBN10:
0073260983
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/23/2006
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill Science/Engineering/Math

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 1/23/2006.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.

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Summary

A striking collection of eyes showcases diversity across the animal kingdom. Arthropod eyes may be the most unique in shape, as evidenced by those of a hornet and a red damselfly, but bright color is not the exclusive province of any one group. The pink stalked eyes of a mantis shrimp vie for attention with the vivid yellow surround of an Australian Pelican eye and the red on green color scheme of a tree frog. Orange eyes stand out in an iguana and a Cape Eagle Owl, but blend with the fur of an Indonesian Tarsier. Vertical pupils in a Green Tree Python or a Nile Crocodile are unlike those of a parrotfish or a mandrill, but are not so strange as the horizontal bar of an Atlantic Oval Squid eye. Despite the exotic forms of eyes, recent research suggests a common origin for vertebrate and invertebrate visual systems. The two systems use different photoreceptor cells in the eye, but vertebrate photoreceptors have been identified in the brain of a marine invertebrate; a clam worm. Present of both cell types in a polychaete, in the eye and brain, indicates shared ancestry for vertebrate and invertebrate eyes. (Left to right, top to bottom; 1st row: Caracal, Red Damselfly, Bald Eagle, Atlantic Oval Squid. 2nd row: Iguana, 3rd row: Hornet, Horsefly, Squirrelfish, Mantis Shrimp. 4th row: Green Tree Python, Buffalo, Cape Eagle Owl, Tarsier. 5th row: Red-Eyed Tree Frog, Tarantula, Australian Pelican, Mandrill. 6th row: Nile Crocodile, Longlure Frogfish, Bibron's Gecko, Parrotfish.) Book jacket.

Table of Contents

preface vi
PART ONE ACTIVITY OF LIFE
Exercise 1 Ecological Relationships of Animals
2(5)
Exercise 1: A study of population growth, with application of the scientific method
2(5)
Exercise 2 Introduction to Animal Classification
7(9)
Use of a taxonomic key for animal identification
7(2)
Key to the major animal taxa
9(7)
PART TWO THE DIVERSITY OF ANIMAL LIFE
Exercise 3 The Microscope
16(8)
Exercise 3A: Compound light microscope
16(6)
Exercise 3B: Stereoscopic dissecting microscope
22(2)
Exercise 4 Protozoan Groups
24(25)
Classification
24(1)
Exercise 4A: Amebas
25(8)
Exercise 4B: Phylum Chlorophyta---Volvox, Phylum Euglenozoa---Euglena, and Trypanosoma
33(8)
Exercise 4C: Phylum Apicomplexa, Class Gregarinea, Class Coccidea---Gregarina and Plasmodium
41(2)
Exercise 4D: Phylum Ciliophora---Paramecium and other ciliates
43(6)
Exercise 5 The Sponges
49(8)
Classification: Phylum Porifera
49(1)
Exercise 5: Class Calcarea---Sycon
49(8)
Exercise 6 The Radiate Animals
57(15)
Classification: Phylum Cnidaria
57(1)
Exercise 6A: Class Hydrozoa---Hydra, Obelia, and Gonionemus
58(13)
Exercise 6B: Class Scyphozoa---Aurelia, a ``true'' jellyfish
71(1)
Exercise 6C: Class Anthozoa---Metridium, a sea anemone, and Astrangia, a stony coral
71(1)
Exercise 7 The Acoelomate Animals
72(16)
The acoelomate phyla
72(1)
Classification: Phylum Platyhelminthes
72(1)
Exercise 7A: Class Turbellaria---the planarians
73(5)
Exercise 7B: Class Trematoda---the digenetic flukes
78(3)
Exercise 7C: Class Cestoda---the tapeworms
81(3)
Experimenting in Zoology: Planaria regeneration experiment
84(4)
Exercise 8 The Pseudocoelomate Animals
88(10)
Exercise 8A: Phylum Nematoda---Ascaris and others
88(6)
Exercise 8B: A brief look at some other pseudocoelomates
94(4)
Exercise 9 The Molluscs
98(14)
Classification: Phylum Mollusca
98(1)
Exercise 9A: Class Bivalvia (= Pelecypoda)---the freshwater clam
99(8)
Exercise 9B: Class Gastropoda---the pulmonate land snail
107(2)
Exercise 9C: Class Cephalopoda---Loligo, the squid
109(3)
Exercise 10 The Annelids
112(15)
Classification: Phylum Annelida
112(1)
Exercise 10A: Class Polychaeta---the Clamworm
113(2)
Exercise 10B: Class Oligochaeta---the earthworms
115(8)
Exercise 10C: Class Hirudinea---the leech
123(2)
Experimenting in Zoology: Behavior of the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis
125(2)
Exercise 11 The Chelicerate Arthropods
127(7)
Classification: Phylum Arthropods
127(1)
Exercise 11: The chelicerate arthropods---the horseshoe crab and garden spider
128(6)
Exercise 12 The Crustacean Arthropods
134(12)
Exercise 12: Subphylum Crustacea---the crayfish (or lobster) and other crustaceans
134(10)
Experimenting in Zoology: The Phototactic Behavior of Dapbnia
144(2)
Exercise 13 The Uniramia Arthropods: Myriapods and Insects
146(19)
Exercise 13A: The myriapods---centipedes and millipedes
146(2)
Exercise 13B: The insects---the grasshopper and the honey bee
148(7)
Exercise 13C: The insects---the house cricket
155(3)
Exercise 13D: Collection and classification of insects
158(1)
Key to the principal orders of insects
159(6)
Exercise 14 The Echinoderms
165(15)
Classification: Phylum Echinodermata
165(1)
Exercise 14A: Class Asteroidea---the sea stars
166(5)
Exercise 14B: Class Ophiuroidea---the brittle stars
171(2)
Exercise 14C: Class Echinoidea---the sea urchin
173(3)
Exercise 14D: Class Holothuroidea---the sea cucumber
176(4)
Exercise 15 Phylum Chordata: A Deuterostome Group
180(8)
What Defines a Chordate?
180(1)
Classification: Phylum Chordata
180(1)
Exercise 15A: Subphylum Urochordata---Ciona, an ascidian
181(3)
Exercise 15B: Subphylum Cephalochordata---amphioxus
184(4)
Exercise 16 The Fishes---Lampreys, Sharks, and Bony Fishes
188(19)
Exercise 16A: Class Cephalaspidomorphi (= Petromyzontes)---the lampreys (ammocoete larva and adult)
188(4)
Exercise 16B: Class Chondrichthyes---the cartilaginous fishes
192(6)
Exercise 16C: Class Osteichthyes---the bony fishes
198(4)
Experimenting in Zoology: Aggression in Paradise Fish, Macropodus opercularis
202(2)
Experimenting in Zoology: Analysis of the multiple hemoglobin system in Carassius auratus, the common goldfish
204(3)
Exercise 17 Class Amphibia
207(17)
Exercise 17A: Behavior and adaptations
207(3)
Exercise 17B: The skeleton
210(1)
Exercise 17C: The skeletal muscles
211(5)
Exercise 17D: The digestive, respiratory, and urogenital systems
216(3)
Exercise 17E: The circulatory system
219(5)
Exercise 18 Class Reptilia
224(5)
Exercise 18: The painted turtle
224(5)
Exercise 19 Class Aves
229(3)
Exercise 19: The pigeon
229(3)
Exercise 20 Class Mammalia
232(31)
Exercise 20A: The skeleton
233(4)
Exercise 20B: The muscular system
237(8)
Exercise 20C: The digestive system
245(6)
Exercise 20D: The urogenital system
251(4)
Exercise 20F: The circulatory system
255(8)
Appendix: Sources of Living Material and Prepared Microslides 263(2)
Credits 265(1)
Index 266


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