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Language Development : An Introduction,9780023901911
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Language Development : An Introduction

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780023901911

ISBN10:
0023901918
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/1996
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $66.00
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Summary

Clearly written, well-organized, and comprehensive, Language Development: An Introduction is the most widely used text in its area. With its updated coverage of pre-school and school-age language development and increased coverage of multicultural issues, the new fourth edition continues its thorough coverage of the five major areas of language. Within a practical, chronological framework, Language Development: An Introduction examines every aspect of syntax, morphology, semantics, phonology, and pragmatics. It also explores early cognition and presymbolic communication -- topics not often found in introductory texts -- with a chapter on language variations, a strengthened chapter on learning and teaching language, and a renewed emphasis on pragmatics. The author presents even the most complex, technical concepts at an appropriate level for beginning students. In doing so, he has created a text that will be useful to future parents, educators, psychologists, and speech-language pathologists.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
1 The Territory
2(26)
Chapter Objectives
3(2)
This Text and You
5(1)
Speech, Language, and Communication
6(8)
Speech
7(1)
Language
8(3)
Communication
11(3)
Properties of Language
14(3)
Language as a Social Tool
14(1)
A Rule-Governed System
14(2)
A Generative System
16(1)
Components of Language
17(8)
Syntax
18(2)
Morphology
20(1)
Phonology
21(1)
Semantics
22(1)
Pragmatics
23(2)
Relationship of Language Components
25(1)
Conclusion
25(2)
Reflections
27(1)
2 Language-Development Models
28(38)
Chapter Objectives
29(2)
Behavioral Theory
31(4)
Operant Conditioning
31(3)
Limitations
34(1)
Contributions
35(1)
Psycholinguistic Theory: A Syntactic Model
35(12)
Biological Basis
35(1)
Primate Studies: Do Other Species Have Language?
36(1)
Linguistic Processing
36(6)
Language Acquisition
42(1)
Limitations
42(1)
Contributions
43(1)
Government-Binding Theory
44(3)
Psycholinguistic Theory: A Semantic/Cognitive Model
47(8)
Case Grammer: A Beginning
47(2)
The Semantic Revolution
49(3)
Language Development
52(2)
Limitations
54(1)
Contributions
55(1)
Socialinguistic Theory
55(8)
Speech-Act Theory
57(2)
Language Acquisition
59(3)
Limitations
62(1)
Contributions
62(1)
Conclusion
63(1)
Reflections
64(2)
3 Child Development
66(42)
Chapter Objectives
67(39)
Developmental Patterns
68(1)
Developmental Predictability
68(1)
Developmental Milestones
68(1)
Developmental Opportunity
68(1)
Developmental Phases or Periods
69(1)
Individual Differences
69(1)
The Developing Child
70(1)
The New Kid in Town: Age Birth to One Month
71(7)
The Examiner: Age One to Six Months
78(5)
The Experimenter: Age Seven to Twelve Months
83(7)
The Explorer: Age Twelve to Twenty-Four Months
90(5)
The Exhibitor: Age Three to Five Years
95(7)
The Expert: School-Age-Years
102(4)
Conclusion
106(1)
Reflections
107(1)
4 Neurolinguistics
108(20)
Chapter Objectives
109(1)
Central Nervouse System
109(8)
Hemispheric Asymmetry
113(1)
Brain Maturation
114(3)
Language Processing
117(9)
Models of Linguistic Processing
121(5)
Conclusion
126(1)
Reflections
126(2)
5 Cognitive and Perceptual Bases of Early Language
128(28)
Chapter Objectives
129(1)
Which Came First, Cognition or Language?
130(3)
Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development
133(16)
Basic Theoretical Tenets
134(2)
Cognitive Development
136(1)
Sensorimotor Stage: Age Birth to Two Years
137(6)
Relation of Sensorimotor Period to Language
143(5)
Conclusion and Critique
148(1)
Information-Processing Model
149(2)
Early Perceptual Development
151(3)
Distancing
153(1)
Summary
153(1)
Conclusion
154(1)
Reflections
155(1)
6 The Social and Communicative Bases of Early Language
156(42)
Chapter Objectives
157(3)
Development of Communication: A Chronology
160(16)
The Newborn
160(2)
Socialization and Early Communication: Age Birth to Six Months
162(7)
Development of Intentionality: Age Seven to Twelve Months
169(10)
Maternal Communication Behaviors
176(11)
Infant-Elicited Social Behavior
178(7)
Cultural, Socioeconomic, and Sexual Differences
185(2)
Interactions Between Infant and Caregiver
187(9)
Joint Reference
187(3)
Joint Action
190(4)
Turn-Taking
194(1)
Situational Variations
195(1)
Conclusion
196(1)
Reflections
196(2)
7 Language-Learning Processes in Young Children
198(38)
Chapter Objectives
199(1)
Comprehension, Production, and Cognitive Growth
200(5)
Cognition and Language
200(5)
Child Learning Strategies
205(12)
Toddler Language-Learning Strategies
205(5)
Preschool Language-Learning Strategies
210(7)
Individual Differences
217(1)
Adult Conversational Teaching Techniques
217(12)
Adult Speech to Toddlers
218(7)
Adult Conversations with Preschoolers
225(4)
Importance of Play
229(2)
Cultural and Social Differences
231(3)
Conclusion
234(1)
Reflections
234(2)
8 A First Language
236(36)
Chapter Objectives
237(22)
Single-Word Utterances
238(1)
Pragmatic Aspects of a First Language
239(6)
Initial Lexicons
245(4)
Meaning of Single-Word Utterances
249(10)
Early Multiword Combinations
259(7)
Transition: Early Word Combinations
260(1)
Two-Word Combinations
261(4)
Longer Utterances
265(1)
Phonological Patterns
266(5)
Single-Word Utterances
266(3)
Multiword Utterances
269(1)
Learning Units and Extension
270(1)
Conclusion
270(1)
Reflections
271(1)
9 Preschool Pragmatic and Semantic Development
272(28)
Chapter Objectives
273(1)
Pragmatic Development
273(16)
The Conversational Context
274(11)
Narratives
285(3)
Summary
288(1)
Semantic Development
289(7)
Relational Terms
291(5)
Interdependence of Form, Content, and Use: Pronouns
296(3)
Conclusion
299(1)
Reflections
299(1)
10 Preschool Development of Language Form
300(42)
Chapter Objectives
301(1)
Stages of Syntactic and Morphologic Development
302(13)
Computing MLU
302(2)
MLU and Stage of Development
304(1)
Morphologic Development
305(1)
Stage II: Brown's Fourteen Morphemes
305(6)
Determinants of Acquisition Order
311(1)
Other Early Morphemes
312(2)
Morphological Rule Learning and Other Aspects of Language
314(1)
Sentence-Form Development
314(14)
Sentence Elements
315(6)
Sentence Types
321(7)
Embedding and Conjoining
328(8)
Phrasal Embedding
329(1)
Subordinate Clause Embedding
330(3)
Clausal Conjoining
333(3)
Summary
336(1)
Phonologic Development
336(5)
Phonological Processes
336(5)
Conclusion
341(1)
Reflections
341(1)
11 School-Age and Adult Pragmatic and Semantic Development
342(30)
Chapter Objectives
343(27)
Pragmatic Development
346(1)
Narratives
346(8)
Narrative Differences
354(1)
Conversational Abilities
354(5)
Gender Differences
359(4)
Summary
363(1)
Semantic Development
363(1)
Vocabulary Growth
363(2)
Syntagmatic-Paradigmatic Shift
365(1)
Related Cognitive Processing
366(2)
Figurative Language
368(2)
Conclusion
370(1)
Reflections
371(1)
12 School-Age and Adult Language Form and Mode Development
372(26)
Chapter Objectives
373(1)
Synatactic and Morphologic Development
374(9)
Morophologic Development
374(2)
Noun-and Verb-Phrase Development
376(2)
Sentence Types
378(5)
Summary
383(1)
Phonological Development
383(2)
Morpohonemic Development
383(1)
Summary
384(1)
Metalinguistic Abilities
385(2)
Reading and Writing: A New Mode
387(10)
The Process of Reading
387(3)
Reading Development
390(3)
The Process of Writing
393(1)
Writing Development
393(4)
Summary
397(1)
Conclusion
397(1)
Reflections
397(1)
13 Language Differences: Bidialectism and Bilingualism
393(30)
Chapter Objectives
399(2)
Dialects
401(14)
Related Factors
402(2)
American English Dialects
404(11)
Bilingualism
415(11)
Effects of Bilingualism on Language Learning
418(5)
Code Switching and Development
423(1)
Bilingualism and Cognition
424(1)
Cultural Diversity
425(1)
Conclusion
426(1)
Reflections
426(2)
14 Language Research and Analysis
428(16)
Chapter Objectives
429(1)
Issues in the Study of Child Language
430(6)
Method of Data Collection
430(1)
Sample Size and Variability
431(2)
Naturaliness and Representativeness of the Data
433(1)
Collection Procedures
434(1)
Analysis Procedures
435(1)
Cross-Language Studies
436(1)
Examples of Child Language Data
437(4)
Conclusion
441(1)
Reflections
442(2)
15 Disorders and Development
444(5)
Chapter Objectives
445(1)
The Development Approach
446(3)
Appendix: American English Speech Sounds 449(8)
Glossary 457(10)
References 467(58)
Subject Index 525(10)
Author Index 535


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