9780521547451

Language Teacher Supervision: A Case-Based Approach

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780521547451

  • ISBN10:

    0521547458

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2006-08-14
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Purchase Benefits
  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $46.25 Save up to $6.94
  • Buy New
    $39.31
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    SPECIAL ORDER: 1-2 WEEKS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Teachers can be promoted to supervisory positions for a variety of reasons, such as excellent teaching skills, "people skills," or seniority. Seldom are teachers made supervisors because they have had specific professional preparation for the role.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xv
Chapter 1 Doing supervision: Roles and skills 1(33)
Case for analysis: Your new job as a language teacher supervisor
2(1)
Supervision as a profession
2(2)
What is language teacher supervision?
4(2)
Supervisors' varied roles in professional contexts
6(2)
Roles of teacher supervisors in general education
8(5)
Supervisory roles in language education contexts
13(4)
Supervisory skills
17(5)
The case approach to teaching and learning
22(5)
Concluding comments
27(7)
Chapter 2 Awareness and attitude 34(20)
Case for analysis: A question of varieties
34(1)
Awareness and language teacher supervision
35(5)
Attitudes, language teaching, and language teacher supervision
40(2)
Sociocultural theory and language teacher supervision
42(2)
Working with teachers' knowledge and skills
44(3)
Attitudes, awareness, and teachers' journals
47(2)
Promoting awareness and development
49(1)
Concluding comments
50(4)
Chapter 3 Autonomy and authority 54(27)
Case for analysis: The "teacher's pet" issue
54(1)
Autonomy in second language learning and teaching contexts
55(5)
Autonomy, supervision, and power
60(3)
Autonomy and self-regulated action
63(5)
Autonomy in decision making and action taking
68(5)
Authority
73(4)
Concluding comments
77(4)
Chapter 4 Issues in observing language teachers 81(18)
Case for analysis: Getting through the door
81(1)
To observe or not to observe: That is the first question
82(4)
To collect data or not to collect data: That is the second question
86(6)
Key concepts in data collection
92(3)
Concluding comments
95(4)
Chapter 5 Manual data collection procedures 99(23)
Case for analysis: Wrong place on the audiotape
99(1)
Generating field notes as classroom data
100(12)
Using observation instruments
112(6)
Concluding comments
118(4)
Chapter 6 Electronic data collection procedures 122(18)
Case for analysis: Working with a transcript
122(1)
Using audiotapes to collect observational data
123(1)
Using videotapes to collect observational data
124(3)
Advantages and disadvantages of electronic data collection
127(2)
Using transcripts
129(2)
Triangulation in data collection
131(1)
Technological developments in supervision
132(3)
Concluding comments
135(5)
Chapter 7 The post-observation conference 140(20)
Case for analysis: Classroom control issues
140(1)
The role of feedback in language teacher supervision
141(7)
Factors affecting supervisory discourse
148(2)
Macroanalyses of the post-observation conference
150(6)
Supervisors' nonverbal behavior during post-observation conferences
156(1)
Concluding comments
157(3)
Chapter 8 Mitigation and the microanalysis of supervisory discourse 160(22)
Case for analysis: A tricky post-observation conference
160(4)
Face-threatening acts in the feedback conference
164(2)
Mitigation in supervisory discourse
166(5)
Syntactic mitigation devices
171(3)
Semantic mitigation devices
174(3)
Indirect mitigation devices
177(2)
Concluding comments
179(3)
Chapter 9 Purposes, participants, and principles in language teacher evaluation 182(24)
Case for analysis: Summative evaluation of two teachers
182(2)
Purposes of teacher evaluation
184(1)
Sources of input: Participants in the language teacher evaluation process
185(7)
Principles for language teacher evaluation
192(2)
Portfolio assessment
194(4)
Problems in language teacher evaluation
198(4)
Concluding comments
202(4)
Chapter 10 Criteria for language teacher evaluation 206(19)
Case for analysis: Letter of recommendation
207(1)
Evaluative criteria
208(5)
Problems in defining effective teaching
213(4)
Factors influencing teacher effectiveness
217(2)
Allocated time and engaged time
219(3)
Concluding comments
222(3)
Chapter 11 Supervising preservice language teachers 225(26)
Case for analysis: The practicum student
225(1)
The prevalence of research on preservice teacher supervision
226(1)
Situational leadership and language teacher supervision
227(6)
Participants in the supervision of student teachers
233(9)
Problems in giving feedback to preservice teachers
242(5)
Concluding comments
247(4)
Chapter 12 Supervising teaching assistants 251(16)
Case for analysis: Rater reliability
251(1)
The work of teaching assistants
252(1)
The central dilemma in supervising teaching assistants
253(4)
International teaching assistants
257(1)
Coordination and quality control
258(2)
Strategies for supervising teaching assistants
260(2)
Concluding comments
262(5)
Chapter 13 Supervising in-service language teachers 267(26)
Case for analysis: The curriculum issue
267(2)
Teacher decision making jug and language teacher supervision
269(7)
The induction years
276(1)
Attitudinal factors in the supervision of language teachers
277(7)
Research on supervision in in-service contexts
284(5)
Concluding comments
289(4)
Chapter 14 Supervising non-native-speaking teachers 293(21)
Case for analysis: Working with less-than-proficient language teachers
293(1)
Nativeness in the broader context
294(3)
Issues in working with non-native teachers
297(1)
Strategies for supporting non-native-speaking language teachers
298(2)
Defining language proficiency standards for teachers
300(6)
Language teachers' perceptions
306(4)
Concluding comments
310(4)
Chapter 15 Professionalism, paradigm shifts, and language teacher supervision 314(31)
Case for analysis: Exploring our options
315(3)
Teacher professionalism and language teacher supervision
318(7)
Reflective teaching and language teacher supervision
325(7)
Alternatives to supervision
332(8)
Supervision in service to teaching and learning
340(1)
Concluding comments
341(4)
References 345(28)
Author index 373(6)
Subject index 379

Rewards Program

Write a Review