9780415246811

Late Kant: Towards Another Law of the Earth

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780415246811

  • ISBN10:

    0415246814

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Nonspecific Binding
  • Copyright: 2003-09-10
  • Publisher: Routledge

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $52.95 Save up to $5.29
  • Rent Book $47.66
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Fenves becomes one of the first to thoroughly explore Kant's later writings and give them the detailed scholarly attention they deserve. In his opening chapters, Fenves examines in detail the various essays in which Kant invents, formulates and complicates the thesis of "radical evil"--a thesis which serves as the point of departure for all his later writings.Late Kantthen turns towards the counter-thesis of "radical mean-ness," which states that human beings exist on earth for the sake of another species or race of human beings. The consequences of this startling thesis are that human beings cannot claim possession of the earth, but must rather prepare the earth for its rightful owners.

Author Biography

Peter Fenves is Professor of German, Comparative Literature, and Jewish Studies at Northwestern University.

Table of Contents

Note on translation x
Introduction 1(7)
Lateness
1(3)
Inconsistency
4(2)
A late-coming kind
6(2)
1 The pleasures of failure: toward an unnumbered "Remark" in the Critique of Judgment 8(24)
The spirit of Epicurus
8(6)
"The attainment of every intention"
14(6)
Whole life
20(4)
Laughter
24(5)
The inner "jokester"
29(3)
2 The sovereign sentence: from the Preface to the first edition of the first Critique to the Doctrine of Right 32(15)
Infallibility
32(3)
Echoing the king
35(3)
"The spectacle of a slaughter-bench"
38(4)
Colonialism
42(3)
Another historical sign
45(2)
3 The other sovereign sentence: "On the Failure of All Philosophical Attempts at Theodicy" 47(28)
"Without fail"
47(2)
An inside joke
49(3)
Laughter
52(3)
"Authentic interpretation"
55(4)
Allegorical expression
59(4)
Leviathan
63(3)
Sadness
66(6)
Immanuel
72(3)
4 Out of the blue: "On the Radical Evil in Human Nature" 75(17)
Secrecy
75(3)
Proof by virtue of its absence
78(5)
The blues
83(6)
"A multicolored, diverse self"
89(3)
5 Under the sign of failure: Toward Eternal Peace 92(22)
Projectiles of peace
92(4)
Satire
96(5)
Erasing race
101(4)
"The Antichrist"
105(1)
Chance
106(4)
The remnant race
110(4)
6 In the name of friendship; or the case for inconsistency 114(22)
Hypocrisy and hypercritique
114(3)
The friend vanishes
117(4)
Keeping track of one's friends
121(3)
Fraternity
124(2)
Derrida with Kant
126(3)
Arendt with Lessing
129(7)
7 Revolution in the air; or the end of the human regime on earth 136(26)
The death of cats in Copenhagen
136(2)
A friendly joke
138(1)
Electrifying events
139(4)
"The end of all things"
143(7)
Arrested thought
150(4)
Transitions
154(4)
Going further
158(4)
Conclusion: making way for another law of the earth 162(13)
The thesis of radical mean-nest
162(2)
Consequences
164(3)
Concession
167(3)
Another delay
170(1)
The last laugh
171(4)
Notes 175(32)
Bibliography 207(9)
Sources 216(1)
Index 217

Rewards Program

Write a Review