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Latin America : A Concise Interpretive History,9780130195760
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Latin America : A Concise Interpretive History

by ;
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780130195760

ISBN10:
0130195766
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $66.60

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This is the 8th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2007.
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Summary

For courses in Modern Latin America. This landmark volume of Latin American history weaves the history of an entire region into a coherent story that emphasizes both common themes and regional and national specificity. This unique narrative provides an interpretive history of Modern Latin America with a focus on the central dynamic of Latin American historythe enigma of poor people inhabiting rich lands. The Seventh Edition has been updated and modernized to reflect recent research, interpretations, and developments.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Acknowledgments xvii
The Origins of a Multiracial Society
1(28)
The Land
1(5)
The Indian
6(5)
The European
11(3)
Confrontation and Conquest
14(8)
The African
22(4)
Documents:
Aztecs Lament the Fall of Tenochtitlan
26(1)
Cortes is Awed by Tenochtitlan
26(2)
Equiano: A Slave En Route to the New World
28(1)
The Institutions of Empire
29(32)
Economy
30(9)
Government
39(8)
The Church
47(4)
Society and Culture
51(2)
Cracks in the Empire
53(4)
Documents:
An Early Feminist Statement
57(1)
An Indian Cabildo Writes to the Crown, 1554
58(3)
Independence
61(23)
A Changing Mentality Begets New Attitudes and Action
62(6)
The Slaves Declare Haiti's Independence
68(2)
An Unsuccessful Popular Revolution in Mexico
70(2)
Elitist Revolts
72(5)
Documents:
Micaela Bastidas Puyucahua Advises
Her Husband, Tupac Amaru
77(2)
The Jamaica Letter
79(5)
Simon Bolivar
New Nations
84(47)
The Transfer and Legitimization of Power
85(6)
The Tense Societies
91(8)
Economic Stagnation
99(8)
A Lingering Legacy of the Enlightenment
107(5)
Caudillos
112(11)
Documents:
Civilization and Barbarism
123(5)
Domingo F. Sarmiento
El Gaucho Martin Fierro
128(3)
The Emergence of the Modern State
131(38)
Political Stability
132(4)
Positivism and Progress
136(5)
Economic Prosperity
141(4)
Modest Industrialization
145(2)
Progress on the Periphery
147(2)
The Growth of Cities
149(5)
Continuity and Change
154(2)
The Popular Challenge
156(7)
Documents:
The Mexican Constitution of 1857
163(1)
In Support of Porfirio Diaz
163(4)
A Chilean Offers a Different Vision
167(2)
New Actors on an Old Stage
169(30)
The Presence of the United States
170(9)
The Middle Sectors Emerge
179(3)
The Middle Class in Politics
182(6)
The Middle Sectors and Feminism
188(6)
Documents:
Our America
194(3)
Jose Marti
Ode to Roosevelt
197(2)
The Past Challenged
199(27)
Mexico's Violent Response to the Past
200(11)
Nationalism as a Force for Change
211(5)
Changing Racial Attitudes
216(6)
Documents:
The Plan of Ayala
222(1)
Carlos Fuentes on the Revolution
223(3)
From World Wars to Cold War
226(29)
Economic Crises
227(3)
Dictators and Populists
230(6)
Latin America Turns Inward
236(5)
A Flirtation with Democracy
241(6)
Documents:
A Different Feminism?
247(5)
Evita
The Periphery v. the Center
252(3)
Raul Prebisch
The Revolutionary Option
255(31)
Cuba
258(9)
Cuba's Impact
267(5)
Chile
272(2)
Nicaragua
274(7)
Documents:
A Nicaraguan Revolutionary Poet
281(1)
Leonel Rugama
Cuba's Poet Laureate
282(2)
Nicolas Guillen
Liberation Theology: A Voice for the Poor
284(2)
Modern Problems
286(27)
New Economic Patterns
287(2)
Military Models for Change
289(7)
War in Central America
296(7)
Do Elections Make Democracies?
303(5)
Documents:
Reasons for War
308(1)
Manuel Jose Arce
Never Again: Reports on Torturers in Argentina, Brazil, and Guatemala
309(4)
The Enigma Remains
313(21)
Neoliberalism: The Return of an Old Model
314(2)
A New Kind of Revolution
316(2)
The Post-Cold War United States
318(4)
The Environmental Cost
322(2)
The Enigma Remains
324(5)
Documents:
Zapatistas: A New Voice from the Lacandon Jungle
329(3)
A Poet for the Millennium
332(2)
A Chronology of Significant Dates in Latin American History 334(6)
Statistics on the Nations of Latin America 340(3)
A Glossary of Spanish and Portuguese Terms 343(4)
A Glossary of Concepts and Terms 347(6)
The Novel as History: A Reading Guide 353(9)
Index 362

Excerpts

I was fortunate to have the opportunity to train with E. Bradford Burns at the University of California, Los Angeles. I was among the last of his graduate students: He signed my dissertation in August 1995 and died that December. I have missed him terribly, especially as I have taught this text and wished that we could continue our long talks and often heated debates about Latin America. Prentice Hall's invitation to revise the book was simultaneously flattering and daunting. It is an honor to try to carry on the Burns tradition, but it also seems presumptuous to rewrite one's mentor. I was aided in the task, however, by Professor Burns's own sage advice to me years ago: "It is the job of each generation of scholars to revise the previous generation." I am taking him at his word. This book remains a landmark in the teaching of Latin American history. It is a narrative that weaves the history of an entire region into a coherent story that emphasizes both common themes and regional and national specificity; it thus breaks away from the old tradition of marching through the separate stories of various countries in the region. Most importantly, the narrative is grounded in Professor Burns's sharp, succinct analysis of the central dynamic of Latin American history: the enigma of "poor people inhabiting rich-lands" because the region's elites have "tended to confuse their own well-being and desires with those of the nation at large." I find that analysis to be as on target today as it was in 1972, when the first edition of this text was published. When it first appeared, the textbook also was the first to adopt the perspective of dependency theory, which came to dominate the debate about Latin American development until the 1990s. It has become quite fashionable at the end of the millennium to dismiss the dependency school, laughing at its naivete. But as Robert A. Packenham argues inThe Dependency Movement: Scholarship and Politics in Development Studies,"reports of the death of the dependency movement are premature." Packenham describes the 1991 World Congress of the International Political Science Association meeting in Buenos Aires, at which dependency authors restated their supposedly dated views to enthusiastic applause and even a standing ovation. Indeed, it can be argued that Latin America is more dependent than ever before. There have been many critiques of dependency theory, from within the wide-ranging dependentista camp itself, between classical Marxists and dependentistas, and between modernization advocates and dependency theorists. Some of the more simplistic versions of dependency theory did seem to reduce Latin American relations to an "us" and "them" dynamic, ignoring the role of Latin American elites. At times the elites were seen as mere lackeys of the developed countries, rather than a dominant class with its own agenda within Latin America. Dependency theorists who predicted that no real change could take place within the structure of Latin American economies were confronted by examples such as Brazil, which combined the state, the private sector, and foreign interests in an extensive process of industrialization and changed from a primary-product exporter to a regional power in manufacturing. Some dependentistas, Burns among them, advocated a virtual withdrawal from the world market and a return to a more simple life, in which domestic goods would suffice. Many of those debates do indeed seem outmoded today. Certainly solutions that called for near autarky seem unrealistic amid today's relentless onslaught of globalization. Nonetheless, the basic description provided by dependency theory still holds true: The mere equation of growth with development is erroneous. The rise in gross national product, if it is not redistributed, benefits only a tiny percentage of the population. Latin America still suffers from the world's most inequitable distribution of wealth, a condition that


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