CART

(0) items

Learning Theories : An Educational Perspective,9780130384966
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Learning Theories : An Educational Perspective

by
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780130384966

ISBN10:
0130384968
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2008
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $130.00
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $4.25
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Learning Theories : An Educational Perspective
    Learning Theories : An Educational Perspective
  • Learning Theories : An Educational Perspective
    Learning Theories : An Educational Perspective
  • Learning Theories : An Educational Perspective
    Learning Theories : An Educational Perspective




Summary

Through its succinct yet thorough overviews of current behavioral, cognitive and developmental theories, this book explores the many ways in which learning principles can be applied in a variety of educational settings, with a diverse population of learners. It features down-to-earth language, clear explanations, and specific examples of abstract concepts. The author examines the relationship between learning and other topics of importance to educators-development, motivation, instruction, and self-regulation. A detailed glossary of more than 300 technical terms facilitates understanding, and a bibliography with more than 1,100 references encourages self-study. For future and in-service teachers with a minimal psychology background.

Table of Contents

1 Learning: Introduction, Issues, Historical Perspectives 1(28)
Learning Defined
2(1)
Learning Theory and Research
3(3)
Functions of Theory
3(1)
Conducting Research
3(3)
Methods of Assessing Learning
6(4)
Direct Observations
7(1)
Written Responses
8(1)
Oral Responses
8(1)
Ratings by Others
9(1)
Self-Reports
9(1)
Precursors of Modern Learning Theories
10(7)
Learning Theory and Philosophy
11(2)
Beginnings of the Psychological Study of Learning
13(2)
Structuralism and Functionalism
15(2)
Critical Issues in the Study of Learning
17(5)
How Does Learning Occur?
17(1)
Which Factors Influence Learning?
18(1)
What Is the Role of Memory?
19(1)
What Is the Role of Motivation?
19(1)
How Does Transfer Occur?
20(1)
What Processes Are Involved in Self-Regulation?
21(1)
What Are the Implications for Instruction?
21(1)
Relation of Learning and Instruction
22(3)
Historical Perspective
22(2)
Instructional Commonalities
24(1)
Integration of Theory and Practice
25(1)
Three Learning Scenarios
25(2)
Kathy Stone's Third-Grade Class
26(1)
Jim Marshall's Ninth-Grade American History Class
26(1)
Gina Brown's Undergraduate Educational Psychology Class
27(1)
Summary
27(2)
2 Behavioral Theories 29(54)
Connectionism
30(6)
Trial-and-Error Learning
30(1)
Laws of Exercise and Effect
31(1)
Other Principles
32(1)
Revisions to Thorndike's Theory
32(1)
Instructional Applications
33(3)
Classical Conditioning
36(5)
Basic Processes
36(1)
Other Phenomena
37(1)
Informational Variables
38(1)
Biological Influences
39(1)
Conditioned Emotional Reactions
40(1)
Watson's Behaviorism
41(2)
Basic Processes
42(1)
Little Albert Experiment
42(1)
Contiguous Conditioning
43(5)
Acts and Movements
44(1)
Associative Strength
44(1)
Rewards and Punishments
45(1)
Habit Formation and Change
45(3)
Operant Conditioning
48(18)
Conceptual Framework
49(1)
Basic Processes
50(9)
Behavioral Change
59(2)
Behavior Modification
61(2)
Verbal Behavior
63(3)
Self Regulation
66(4)
Self-Monitoring
66(3)
Self-Instruction
69(1)
Self-Reinforcement
70(1)
Instructional Applications
70(11)
Behavioral Objectives
71(2)
Programmed Instruction
73(5)
Contingency Contracts
78(2)
Keller Plan
80(1)
Summary
81(2)
3 Social Cognitive Theory 83(53)
Conceptual Framework for Learning
84(4)
Reciprocal Interactions
84(2)
Enactive and Vicarious Learning
86(1)
Learning and Performance
87(1)
Modeling Processes
88(11)
Theories of Imitation
88(2)
Functions of Modeling
90(4)
Cognitive Skill Learning
94(2)
Rule Learning
96(1)
Motor Skill Learning
97(2)
Influences on Learning and Performance
99(5)
Developmental Status of Learners
99(2)
Model Prestige and Competence
101(1)
Vicarious Consequences to Models
101(3)
Goals and Expectations
104(8)
Goals
104(6)
Outcome Expectations
110(2)
Self Efficacy
112(10)
Conceptual Overview
112(2)
Self-Efficacy in Achievement Situations
114(1)
Models and Self Efficacy
114(4)
Motor Skills
118(1)
Instructional Self Efficacy
119(1)
Health and Therapeutic Activities
120(2)
Self Regulation
122(10)
Conceptual Framework
122(1)
Social Cognitive Processes
123(5)
Cyclical Nature of Self-Regulation
128(4)
Instructional Applications
132(2)
Models
132(1)
Self-Efficacy
133(1)
Self-Regulation
134(1)
Summary
134(2)
4 Information Processing 136(54)
Information Processing System
137(6)
Assumptions
137(1)
Two-Store (Dual-Memory) Model
138(1)
Critique
139(1)
Levels of Processing
140(2)
Activation Level
142(1)
Attention
143(4)
Theories of Attention
143(1)
Attention and Learning
144(1)
Attention and Reading
145(2)
Perception
147(7)
Gestalt Theory
147(4)
Sensory Registers
151(1)
LTM Comparisons
152(2)
Two-Store Memory Model
154(10)
Verbal Learning
154(2)
Short-Term (Working) Memory
156(1)
Long-Term Memory
157(3)
Influences on Encoding
160(4)
Long-Term Memory: Storage
164(6)
Propositions
164(2)
Storage of Declarative Knowledge
166(3)
Storage of Procedural Knowledge
169(1)
Production Systems and Connectionist Models
170(4)
Production Systems
170(3)
Connectionist Models
173(1)
Long-Term Memory: Retrieval
174(5)
Retrieval Strategies
174(1)
Encoding Specificity
175(1)
Retrieval of Declarative Knowledge
175(3)
Retrieval of Procedural Knowledge
178(1)
Long-Term Memory: Forgetting
179(5)
Verbal Learning
180(1)
Information Processing
181(3)
Mental Imagery
184(4)
Representation of Spatial Information
184(1)
Imagery in LTM
185(2)
Individual Differences
187(1)
Summary
188(2)
5 Cognitive Learning Processes 190
Conditional Knowledge and Metacognition
190(6)
Conditional Knowledge
191(1)
Metacognition and Learning
192(1)
Variables Influencing Metacognition
193(2)
Metacognition and Behavior
195(1)
Concept Learning
196(6)
The Nature of Concepts
196(2)
Concept Attainment
198(1)
Teaching of Concepts
199(2)
Motivational Processes
201(1)
Problem Solving
202(15)
Problem Solving Defined
203(1)
Historical Influences
203(3)
Heuristics
206(1)
Information Processing Model
207(1)
Problem-Solving Strategies
208(5)
Problem Solving and Learning
213(1)
Experts and Novices
214(2)
Implications for Instruction
216(1)
Transfer
217
Historical Views
217(2)
Activation of Knowledge in Memory
219(1)
Types of Transfer
219(3)
Strategy Transfer
222(1)
Instructional Applications
223

Excerpts

Theory and research on human learning have expanded dramatically in recent years. This point is underscored by considering some of the topics addressed in this text that were not covered in the first edition published in 1991: constructivism, situated cognition, implicit theories, brain development, apprenticeships, peer collaboration, distance education, and E-learning. The relevance of each of these topics to human learning is now firmly established. Better integration with education of such disciplines as psychology, human development, and instructional technology has contributed to the expansion of the field of learning. Despite all these changes, the primary objectives of this fourth edition remain the same as those of the previous three editions: (a) to inform students of learning theoretical principles, concepts, and research findings, especially as they relate to education, and (b) to provide applications of principles and concepts in settings where, teaching and learning occur. Although different theories of learning are discussed, the text continues to focus on cognitive perspectives. This focus is consistent with the contemporary emphasis on learners as seekers and constructors of knowledge rather than as reactors to events. STRUCTURE OF THIS TEXT The text's 10 chapters are organized as follows. In the introductory chapter, I discuss learning theory-, research, and issues, as well as historical foundations of the study of learning and the relation of learning to instruction. The end of this chapter includes three scenarios involving elementary, secondary, and college classes. Throughout the text these scenarios are used to demonstrate applications of principles of learning, motivation, self-regulation, and instruction. Chapter 2 presents behavioral theories of learning. Current cognitive and constructivist views of learning are covered in subsequent chapters: social cognitive theory (Chapter 3); information processing (Chapter 4); cognitive learning processes (Chapter 5); cognition and instruction (Chapter 6); and constructivism (Chapter 7). The final three chapters cover topics relevant to learning: motivation (Chapter 8); content-area learning (Chapter 9); and development and learning (Chapter 10). NEW TO THIS EDITION Readers familiar with prior editions will notice several content and organizational changes in this fourth edition, which reflect evolving theoretical and research emphases. Constructivism, which has become a major guiding framework in content learning and human development, is now covered in a separate chapter, although parts of this chapter--such as Vygotsky's theory--were included in prior editions. To provide better integration of self-regulation and instruction with learning theories, these topics now are integrated within each of the theory chapters rather than appearing as stand-alone chapters. This change reflects the increasing tendency of researchers from different theoretical traditions to investigate how learning principles apply to instructional contexts and students' efforts to self-regulate their academic actions. One exception is Chapter 6, cognition and instruction. This chapter stands alone because of the sheer amount of material relevant to the topic. Separate chapters on motivation and development and learning remain for the same reason, although discussions of these topics are intermingled in other chapters. Chapter 10--development and learning--has been substantially revised and now includes sections on familial and sociocultural influences on learning and brain development. These additions, like the other changes in this volume, reflect the increased interest among educators in these topics and an expanding research base on their role in human learning. Rapid developments in technology necessitated further refocusing of the section on technology and instruction (now in Chapter 6), and the continued growth of r


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...