CART

(0) items

Lipidomics : Technologies and Applications,9783527330980
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Lipidomics : Technologies and Applications

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9783527330980

ISBN10:
3527330984
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
12/26/2012
Publisher(s):
VCH PUBLISHER INC
List Price: $129.00

Buy New Textbook

Currently Available, Usually Ships in 24-48 Hours
N9783527330980
$125.78

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $117.11
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 1st edition with a publication date of 12/26/2012.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

Summary

Focusing on the practical applications, this user-oriented guide presents current technologies and strategies for systems-level lipid analysis, going beyond basic research to concentrate on commercial uses of lipidomics in biomarker and diagnostic development, as well as within pharmaceutical chemistry. The editor and authors have experience of the most recent analytical instruments and techniques, allowing them to provide here first-hand practical experience for newcomers to the field. The first half of the book covers current methodologies, ranging from global to targeted lipidomics and shotgun approaches, while the second part discusses the role of lipidomics in biomedical and pharmaceutical research, covering such diverse fields as inflammation, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular and neurological disease. Both small and large-scale, high-throughput approaches are discussed, resulting in an invaluable source for academic and industrial research and development.

Author Biography

Kim Ekroos currently heads the bioanalytics division at Zora Biosciences in Espoo (Finland). He holds a Ph.D. from the Technical University of Dresden (Germany) and has conducted research in the group of Professor Kai Simons and Dr. Andrej Shevchenko at the Max-Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden. Dr. Ekroos has also worked at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg (Germany). He has made major contributions to the advancement of basic research on lipids and their study with advanced mass spectroscopy methods and software tools. In addition, he has pharmaceutical industry experience from Astra Zeneca where he spent three years successfully developing and utilizing high-throughput molecular lipidomics methods. Today he is focusing on applied molecular lipidomics for unscrambling the mechanistic details by which alterations in tissue-specific lipid metabolism are directly linked to the etiology of lipid-mediated disorders for the benefit of basic science, drug target and lipid biomarker discovery, and development of clinical diagnostics.

Table of Contents

Preface XIII

List of Contributors XV

1 Lipidomics Perspective: From Molecular Lipidomics to Validated Clinical Diagnostics 1
Kim Ekroos

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Hierarchical Categorization of the Analytical Lipid Outputs 2

1.2.1 Lipid Class 3

1.2.2 Sum Compositions 4

1.2.3 Molecular Lipids 5

1.2.4 Structurally Defined Molecular Lipids 6

1.3 The Type of Lipid Information Delivers Different Biological Knowledge 7

1.4 Untying New Biological Evidences through Molecular Lipidomic Applications 9

1.5 Molecular Lipidomics Approaches Clinical Diagnostics 11

1.6 Current Roadblocks in Lipidomics 14

1.7 Conclusions 16

References 16

2 Lipids in Cells 21
Kai Simons, Christian Klose, and Michal Surma

2.1 Introduction 21

2.2 Basis of Cellular Lipid Distribution 22

2.3 Lipid Distribution by Nonvesicular Routes 23

2.4 Lipids in Different Cell Types 24

2.5 Functional Implications of Membrane Lipid Composition 26

2.6 Outlook: Collectives and Phase Separation 29

References 30

3 High-Throughput Molecular Lipidomics 35
Marcus Stahlman, Jan Boren, and Kim Ekroos

3.1 Introduction 35

3.2 Lipid Diversity 35

3.3 Function of Molecular Lipids 38

3.4 Automated Sample Preparation 39

3.5 Different Approaches to Molecular Lipidomics 41

3.5.1 Untargeted versus Targeted Approaches 41

3.5.2 Shotgun Lipidomics 42

3.5.3 Analytical Validation of the Shotgun Approach 44

3.5.4 Targeted LC-MS Lipidomics 45

3.6 Data Processing and Evaluation 46

3.7 Lipidomic Workflows 47

3.8 Conclusions and Future Perspectives 48

References 49

4 Multidimensional Mass Spectrometry-Based Shotgun Lipidomics 53
Hui Jiang, Michael A. Kiebish, Daniel A. Kirschner, and Xianlin Han

4.1 Introduction 53

4.2 Multidimensional Mass Spectrometry-Based Shotgun Lipidomics 53

4.2.1 Intrasource Separation 54

4.2.2 The Principle of Multidimensional Mass Spectrometry 55

4.2.3 Variables in Multidimensional Mass Spectrometry 57

4.2.3.1 Variables in Fragment Monitoring by Tandem MS Scans 57

4.2.3.2 Variables Related to the Infusion Conditions 57

4.2.3.3 Variables under Ionization Conditions 57

4.2.3.4 Variables under Collision Conditions 58

4.2.3.5 Variables Related to the Sample Preparations 58

4.3 Application of Multidimensional Mass Spectrometry-Based Shotgun Lipidomics for Lipidomic Analysis 59

4.3.1 Identification of Lipid Molecular Species by 2D Mass Spectrometry 59

4.3.1.1 Identification of Anionic Lipids 59

4.3.1.2 Identification of Weakly Anionic Lipids 59

4.3.1.3 Identification of Charge Neutral but Polar Lipids 59

4.3.1.4 Identification of Sphingolipids 59

4.3.1.5 The Concerns of the MDMS-Based Shotgun Lipidomics for Identification of Lipid Species 61

4.3.2 Quantification of Lipid Molecular Species by MDMS-Based Shotgun Lipidomics 61

4.3.2.1 The Principle of Quantification of Individual Lipid Species by MS 62

4.3.2.2 Quantification by Using a Two-Step Procedure in MDMS-Based Shotgun Lipidomics 62

4.3.2.3 Quantitative Analysis of PEX7 Mouse Brain Lipidome by MDMS-Based Shotgun Lipidomics 63

4.4 Conclusions 66

References 68

5 Targeted Lipidomics: Sphingolipidomics 73
Ying Liu, Yanfeng Chen, and M. Cameron Sullards

5.1 Introduction 73

5.2 Sphingolipids Description and Nomenclature 75

5.3 Sphingolipids Analysis via Targeted LC-MS/MS 76

5.3.1 Sphingolipid Internal Standards 77

5.3.2 Biological Sample Preparation and Storage 78

5.3.3 Sphingolipid Extraction Protocol 79

5.3.4 Liquid Chromatography 81

5.3.4.1 LCBs and Cer1P 83

5.3.4.2 Cer, HexCer, LacCer, SM, ST, and Cer1P 84

5.3.4.3 Separation of GlcCer and GalCer 85

5.3.5 Mass Spectrometry 85

5.3.5.1 Electrospray Ionization 85

5.3.5.2 Tandem Mass Spectrometry 86

5.3.5.3 Multiple Reaction Monitoring 88

5.3.6 Generation of Standard Curves 89

5.3.7 Data Analysis 90

5.3.8 Quality Control 90

5.4 Applications of Sphingolipidomics in Biology and Disease 91

5.4.1 LC-MS/MS 91

5.4.2 Transcriptomic Guided Tissue Imaging Mass Spectrometry 92

5.5 Conclusions 94

References 94

6 Structural Lipidomics 99
Todd W. Mitchell, Simon H.J. Brown, and Stephen J. Blanksby

6.1 Introduction 99

6.2 Lipid Structure 100

6.3 Structural Analysis of Lipids by Mass Spectrometry 100

6.4 sn Position 105

6.5 Double Bond Position 107

6.5.1 Untargeted Fragmentation 108

6.5.2 Targeted Fragmentation 115

6.6 Double Bond Stereochemistry 122

6.7 Conclusions 123

References 124

7 Imaging Lipids in Tissues by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry 129
Robert M. Barkley, Joseph A. Hankin, Karin A. Zemski Berry, and Robert C. Murphy

7.1 Introduction 129

7.2 Sample Preparation 130

7.3 Matrix 131

7.3.1 Techniques for Matrix Application 131

7.3.2 Matrix Compounds 133

7.4 Instrumentation 134

7.4.1 Lasers and Rastering 134

7.4.2 Ion Formation 136

7.4.3 Mass Analyzers and Ion Detection 137

7.5 Data Processing 139

7.6 Conclusions 141

References 142

8 Lipid Informatics: From a Mass Spectrum to Interactomics 147
Christer S. Ejsing, Peter Husen, and Kirill Tarasov

8.1 Introduction 147

8.2 Lipid Nomenclature 148

8.3 Basic Properties of Lipid Mass Spectrometric Data 151

8.3.1 Mass Spectrum 152

8.3.2 Mass Accuracy and Reproducibility 154

8.3.3 Isotopes, Deisotoping, and Isotope Correction 154

8.4 Data Processing 158

8.4.1 De Novo Lipid Identification 159

8.4.2 Targeted Export of Lipidomic Data 161

8.4.3 Normalization of Lipidomic Data 162

8.5 Lipidomic Data Mining and Visualization 165

8.5.1 Comparative Lipidomics 165

8.5.2 Multivariate Data Analysis 166

8.5.3 Lipidomics in Biomarker Research 166

8.6 Lipidomic Data Integration 168

8.7 Conclusions and Future Perspectives 169

References 170

9 Lipids in Human Diseases 175
M. Mobin Siddique and Scott A. Summers

9.1 Introduction 175

9.2 Obesity 176

9.3 Dyslipidemia 177

9.4 Diabetes 177

9.5 Cardiovascular Disorders 179

9.6 Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy 181

9.7 Neurodegeneration 182

9.8 Cancer 184

9.9 Lysosomal Storage Disorders 186

9.10 Cystic Fibrosis 187

9.11 Anti-Inflammatory Lipid Mediators 188

9.12 Conclusions 188

References 189

10 Lipidomics in Lipoprotein Biology 197
Marie C. Lhomme, Laurent Camont, M. John Chapman, and Anatol Kontush

10.1 Introduction 197

10.2 Metabolism of Lipoproteins 198

10.3 Lipoproteinomics in Normolipidemic Subjects 200

10.3.1 Phospholipids 202

10.3.1.1 Phosphatidylcholine 202

10.3.1.2 Lysophosphatidylcholine 202

10.3.1.3 Phosphatidylethanolamine 203

10.3.1.4 Phosphatidylethanolamine Plasmalogens 203

10.3.1.5 Phosphatidylinositol, Phosphatidylserine, Phosphatidylglycerol, and Phosphatidic Acid 203

10.3.1.6 Cardiolipin 203

10.3.1.7 Isoprostane-Containing PC 203

10.3.2 Sphingolipids 203

10.3.2.1 Sphingomyelin 204

10.3.2.2 Lysosphingolipids 204

10.3.2.3 Ceramide 204

10.3.2.4 Minor Sphingolipids 204

10.3.3 Sterols 205

10.3.4 Cholesteryl Esters 205

10.3.5 Triacylglycerides 205

10.3.6 Minor Lipids 205

10.4 Altered Lipoproteinomics in Dyslipidemia 206

10.4.1 Phospholipids 206

10.4.1.1 Phosphatidylcholine 206

10.4.1.2 Lysophosphatidylcholine 207

10.4.1.3 Phosphatidylethanolamine 208

10.4.1.4 Phosphatidylethanolamine Plasmalogens 208

10.4.1.5 Phosphatidylinositol 208

10.4.1.6 Isoprostane-Containing PC 208

10.4.2 Sphingolipids 209

10.4.2.1 Sphingomyelin 209

10.4.2.2 Lysosphingolipids: S1P and Dihydro S1P 209

10.4.2.3 Ceramide 210

10.4.3 Free Cholesterol 210

10.4.4 Cholesteryl Esters 210

10.4.5 Triacylglycerides 210

10.4.6 Minor Lipids 211

10.4.6.1 Nonesterified Fatty Acids 211

10.4.6.2 Ganglioside GM1 211

10.4.6.3 Oxidized Lipids 211

10.5 Conclusions 211

References 212

11 Mediator Lipidomics in Inflammation Research 219
Makoto Arita, Ryo Iwamoto, and Yosuke Isobe

11.1 Introduction 219

11.2 PUFA-Derived Lipid Mediators: Formation and Action 219

11.3 LC-ESI-MS/MS-Based Lipidomics 222

11.3.1 Sample Preparation 222

11.3.2 LC-ESI-MS/MS Analysis 223

11.4 Mediator Lipidomics in Inflammation and Resolution 226

11.5 Conclusion and Future Perspective 230

References 230

12 Lipidomics for Elucidation of Metabolic Syndrome and Related Lipid Metabolic Disorder 233
Ryo Taguchi, Kazutaka Ikeda, and Hiroki Nakanishi

12.1 Introduction 233

12.2 Basic Strategy of Lipidomics for Elucidating Metabolic Changes of Lipids at the Level of their Molecular Species in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Diseases 234

12.3 Analytical Systems by Mass Spectrometry in Lipidomics 235

12.3.1 LC-MS and LC-MS/MS Analyses for Global Detection of Phospholipids and Triglycerides 235

12.3.2 Infusion Analysis with Precursor Ion and Neutral Loss Scanning 236

12.3.3 Targeted Analysis by Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Oxidized Lipids and Lipid Mediators by LC-MS/MS on Triple-Stage Quadrupole Mass Spectrometers 236

12.4 Lipidomic Data Processing 236

12.4.1 Strategy of Lipid Search 236

12.4.2 Application and Identification Results of “Lipid Search” 237

12.5 Analysis of Lipids as Markers of Metabolic Syndrome 239

12.5.1 Oxidized Phospholipids 239

12.5.1.1 Application for Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Model 239

12.5.2 Bioactive Acidic Phospholipids 240

12.5.2.1 Lysophosphatidic Acid 240

12.5.2.2 Phosphoinositides 241

12.5.3 Oxidative Triglycerides 241

12.5.3.1 Application for Mouse White Adipose Tissue 242

12.5.4 Sphingolipids 244

12.5.4.1 Application for Sphinogolipid Metabolism 244

12.6 Direct Detection of Lipid Molecular Species in Specific Tissue Domains by Disease-Specific Changes 245

12.7 Conclusions 245

References 246

13 Lipidomics in Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease 251
Minna T. J€anis and Reijo Laaksonen

13.1 Introduction 251

13.2 Lipids and Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease 253

13.2.1 Lipoproteins 254

13.2.2 Atherosclerotic Plaque 255

13.2.3 Molecular Lipids 256

13.2.3.1 Eicosanoids 256

13.2.3.2 Sphingolipids and Cholesterol 257

13.2.3.3 Phospholipids 258

13.2.4 Animal Models of Atherosclerotic Research 259

13.3 Diagnostics and Treatment 260

13.3.1 Diagnostic Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis 260

13.3.2 Lipidomics in Efficacy and Safety Measurements 261

13.4 Conclusions 262

References 263

14 Lipid Metabolism in Neurodegenerative Diseases 269
Lynette Lim, Guanghou Shui, and Markus R. Wenk

14.1 Introduction 269

14.1.1 Brain Lipids 270

14.1.2 Mass Spectrometry of Brain Lipids 272

14.2 Alzheimer’s Disease 275

14.2.1 Cholesterol and Cholesterol Esters 276

14.2.2 Sulfatides 277

14.2.3 Plasmalogen Ethanolamines 277

14.2.4 Phospholipases 278

14.2.4.1 Phospholipase A2 278

14.2.4.2 Phospholipase C and Phospholipase D 279

14.3 Parkinson’s Disease 281

14.3.1 Cerebrosides 283

14.3.2 Coenzyme Q 284

14.3.3 Endocannabinoids 285

14.4 Conclusions 287

References 288

15 The Tumor Mitochondrial Lipidome and Respiratory Bioenergetic Insufficiency 297
Thomas N. Seyfried, Jeffrey H. Chuang, Lu Zhang, Xianlin Han, and Michael A. Kiebish

15.1 Introduction 297

15.1.1 Lipidomic Abnormalities in Tumor Mitochondria 298

15.2 Cardiolipin and Electron Transport Chain Abnormalities in Mouse Brain Tumor Mitochondria 299

15.3 Complicating Influence of the in vitro Growth Environment on Cardiolipin Composition and Energy Metabolism 307

15.4 Bioinformatic Methods to Interpret Alterations in the Mitochondrial Lipidome 311

15.5 Conclusions 314

References 314

16 Lipidomics for Pharmaceutical Research 319
Yoshinori Satomi

16.1 Introduction 319

16.2 Biomarkers for Pharmaceutical Research 320

16.3 Strategy for Biomarker Discovery 321

16.4 Conclusions 326

References 326

Index 329



Please wait while the item is added to your cart...