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Literacy's Beginnings : Supporting Young Readers and Writers,9780205386376
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Literacy's Beginnings : Supporting Young Readers and Writers

by ;
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780205386376

ISBN10:
0205386377
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon

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Summary

More Timely Than Ever...; McGee and Richgels have set the standard in this new edition by clearly and simply explaining the issues addressed in Reading First and Early Reading First legislation that affect the reading instruction of young children. Aligned with the findings of the National Reading Panel, this edition's emphasis focuses on child-centered instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, comprehension, and interpretation. Without a question, this text will be the most talked about resource for prospective teachers of children from birth to age eight. New To This Edition bull; bull;Thoroughly describes ways to organize an environment to stimulate the growth of language, both written and oral, making this text an invaluable resource for prospective teachers. bull;Emphasizes child-centered instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, comprehension, and interpretation, giving special attention to instruction in phonological and phonemic awareness embedded in a literature-based program. bull;Highlights the unique opportunities for literacy development aided by computers. bull;Continues to provide examples of scoring rubrics and children's work samples. Provides application activities for the working classroom in ";Beyond the Text"; sections at the end of each chapter. bull;Presents young children's reading and writing from birth to age eight through numerous vignettes. bull;Examines children's learning in social settings, including home, preschool, and school. Reviewers Can't Put This Book Down! ";This book is ideal because of its ability to merge our programmatic philosophy and the students' experiences with more traditional or currently conventional thinking in the world of education, teaching, learning, etc...;"; Barbara Burrington University of Vermont ";...;I think this is a great book. It has proved to be very beneficial to my students."; Gail T. Eichman Cleveland State University ";In my opinion, this book contains the most thorough explanation of children's literacy development that I have read"; Frances Mallow University of Houston Meet the Authors Lea M. McGee is a Professor of Literacy at the University of Alabama where she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in beginning reading, foundations of literacy, and children's literature. She previously taught at Boston College and Louisiana State University. She has published widely in Reading Research Quarterly, The Reading Teacher, and Language Arts. She is co-author of another book with Donald J. Richgels titled Designing Early Literacy Programs for At Risk Children in Preschool and Kindergarten. Donald J. Richgels is a Professor in the Department of Literacy Education at Northern Illinois University, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in language arts, reading, and language development. He is the author of Going to Kindergarten: A Year with an Outstanding Teacher. His work has appeared in Language and Speech, Reading Research Quarterly, Journal of Reading Behavior, The Reading Teacher, Journal of Educational Research, and Early Childhood Research Quarterly. His current research interests are preschool and kindergarten classroom practice and the relationship between spoken language acquisition and literacy development.

Author Biography

Donald J. Richgels is a Professor in the Department of Literacy Education at Northern Illinois University. Lea M. McGee is a Professor of Literacy at Ohio State University.

Table of Contents

Preface xix
PART ONE Learners
1 Understanding Children's Literacy Development
1(32)
Key Concepts
1(1)
Language Development
2(6)
Schemas and Learning
2(3)
The Relation between Language and Learning
5(3)
Children's Concepts about Written Language
8(4)
Ted's Delight: Two Children's Reading and Writing
8(1)
Ted's and Carrie's Concepts about Written Language
9(2)
Learning in Social and Cultural Contexts
11(1)
Concepts about Written Language: Functions, Meanings, Forms, and Meaning-Form Links
11(1)
Written and Spoken Language Functions
12(1)
Written and Spoken Language Meanings
12(3)
Semantics in Spoken Language
13(1)
Meaning in Written Language
14(1)
Written Language Forms
15(4)
Syntax in Spoken Language
15(1)
Forms in Written Language
16(3)
Meaning-Form Links
19(6)
Phonological System in Spoken Language
20(2)
Meaning-Form Links in Written Language
22(3)
Developmental Changes in Children's Reading and Writing
25(4)
Awareness and Exploration
26(1)
Experimental Reading and Writing
27(1)
Early, Transitional, and Independent Reading and Writing
28(1)
Chapter Summary
29(1)
Applying the Information
30(1)
Going Beyond the Text
30(1)
References
31(2)
2 From Birth to Three Years: The Foundations of Literacy Development
33(26)
Key Concepts
33(1)
The Beginnings of Literacy
34(7)
Kristen's Early Literacy Experiences
34(4)
Concepts about Literacy Acquired from Early Book and Drawing Experiences
38(3)
Home Influences on Literacy Learning
41(7)
Parent-Child Interactive Bookreading
41(3)
Participation in Interactive Bookreading
44(1)
Concept of Story
45(2)
Environmental Print
47(1)
Spoken Language Development and Its Relationship to Literacy Development
48(1)
Spoken Language Development
48(3)
Nonimmediate and Decontextualized Spoken Language: Spoken Equivalents to Written Language
49(1)
Family and Cultural Influence on Language and Literacy Development
49(2)
Implications for Child Care and Nursery School
51(3)
Developmentally Appropriate Practice
51(1)
Make Literacy Experiences Pleasurable
51(1)
Arrange the Environment
52(1)
Plan for Language Development
53(1)
Help Parents Provide Strong Support for Literacy Development at Home
53(1)
Chapter Summary
54(1)
Applying the Information
55(1)
Going Beyond the Text
56(1)
References
56(3)
3 From Three to Five Years: Novice Readers and Writers in the Phase of Awareness and Exploration
59(28)
Key Concepts
59(1)
Who Are Novice Readers and Writers?
60(3)
Written Language Communicates Messages: Novice Readers' and Writers' New Insights
60(2)
Examples of Novices
62(1)
Meaning
63(7)
Constructing the Meaning of Environmental Print
63(1)
Constructing Meaning While Listening to Story and Informational Book Read-Alouds
64(3)
Children's Developing Concept about Story and Informational Text
67(1)
Constructing Meaning in Pretend Reading and Retelling
68(1)
Writing Meaningful Messages
69(1)
Written Language Forms
70(6)
Concepts about Print
71(1)
From Scribbles to Alphabet Letters
71(1)
Alphabet Letters
72(2)
Signatures
74(1)
Texts
75(1)
Meaning-Form Links
76(3)
Contextual Dependency
76(1)
Matching Print to Spoken Language: More Than Contextual Dependency
77(1)
Phonological Awareness
78(1)
Using Symbols: The Connections among Dramatic Play, Writing, and Computer Use
79(1)
Written Language Functions
79(2)
A Word of Caution
81(1)
Chapter Summary
81(1)
Applying the Information
82(2)
Going Beyond the Text
84(1)
References
84(3)
4 From Five to Seven Years: Experimenting Readers and Writers
87(32)
Key Concepts
87(1)
Who Are Experimenters?
88(3)
Experimenters' New Awareness
88(1)
Examples of Experimenters
89(2)
Experimenting with Meaning
91(1)
Experimenting with Forms
91(8)
Concept of Word
91(2)
Concept of Word Boundaries
93(2)
Texts
95(4)
Experimenting with Meaning-Form Links
99(13)
Sounding Literate
99(4)
Being Precise
103(1)
Using Sound-Letter Relationships
104(1)
A System Based on Phonemic Awareness
105(1)
Ways of Relating Sounds and Letters
106(2)
Stages of Spelling Development
108(3)
Sound-Letter Relationships in Reading
111(1)
Experimenting with Functions of Written Language
112(1)
A Word of Caution
113(1)
Chapter Summary
113(1)
Applying the Information
114(1)
Going Beyond the Text
115(2)
References
117(2)
5 From Six to Eight Years: Early, Transitional and Self-Generative Readers and Writers
119(24)
Key Concepts
119(1)
Who Are Conventional Readers and Writers?
120(5)
Three Phases of Conventional Literacy Development
120(1)
Examples of Early, Transitional, and Self-Generative Readers and Writers
121(4)
Meaning Construction
125(2)
Meaning Making in Reading: Using Strategies
125(1)
Meaning Making in Reading: Constructing Interpretations of Literature
126(1)
Meaning Making in Writing
127(1)
Written Language Forms
127(7)
Concept of Word
128(1)
Text Form: Story Compositions
128(4)
Text Form: Expositions
132(2)
Meaning-Form Links
134(3)
Decoding
134(1)
Spelling
135(2)
Functions
137(1)
The Traditional End Points: Reading and Word Identification, Vocabulary, and Comprehension
137(1)
Chapter Summary
138(1)
Applying the Information
139(2)
Going Beyond the Text
141(1)
References
141(2)
PART TWO Classrooms
6 Literacy-Rich Classrooms
143(29)
Key Concepts
143(1)
Developmentally Appropriate Practice
144(1)
Characteristics of Literacy-Rich Classrooms
145(1)
Learners
145(1)
The Classroom
146(1)
Literacy Materials
146(5)
The Case for Quality Literature
146(1)
Classroom Literature Collection
147(4)
Physical Arrangement of Classrooms
151(5)
The Case for Library, Writing, and Computer Centers
152(1)
Library Center
152(2)
Writing Center
154(1)
Computer Center
154(2)
Literacy Routines
156(3)
The Case for Classroom Routines
156(1)
Reading Aloud and Telling Stories
157(1)
Independent Reading and Writing
158(1)
Sharing Response-to-Literature Activities
158(1)
Culturally Sensitive and Integrated Curriculum
159(4)
The Case for Culturally Sensitive and Integrated Curriculum
159(1)
Culturally Sensitive Curriculum
160(1)
Literature Theme Units
161(1)
Integrated Content Units
161(2)
Assessment, Instruction, and Grouping
163(2)
The Case for a Variety of Instruction
163(1)
The Case for Multiple Grouping Patterns
164(1)
Instructional Framework
165(1)
Chapter Summary
165(1)
Applying the Information
166(2)
Going Beyond the Text
168(1)
References
168(4)
7 Supporting Literacy Learning in Preschools
172(33)
Key Concepts
172(1)
The Preschool Context
173(4)
What Preschoolers Learn about Literacy at Home and in Preschool
173(1)
The Preschool Classroom
174(3)
Reading and Writing in Exemplary Preschool Classrooms
177(8)
Literacy in an Exemplary Language- and Print-Rich Environment
177(4)
Interactive Read-Alouds in Exemplary Preschools
181(3)
What Are the Characteristics of an Exemplary Preschool Literacy Program?
184(1)
Supporting Vocabulary and Concept Development
185(8)
Laying the Foundation for Comprehension and Composition
185(1)
Interactive Read-Alouds: More Than Reading Aloud
186(1)
Concept-about-Story Activities
187(2)
Storytelling and Drama
189(1)
Dramatic-Play-with-Print Centers
190(2)
Taking Time to Talk
192(1)
The Teacher's Role in Play, Drama, and Conversations: Letting Children Take the Lead
192(1)
Supporting Concepts about Print and Alphabet Letter Learning
193(4)
Shared Reading
193(1)
Shared Writing
194(1)
Demonstrating Concepts about Print at the Writing Center
195(1)
The Sign-in Procedure and Other Name Activities
195(1)
Activities to Promote Alphabet Letter Learning
196(1)
Supporting Children's Development of Phonemic Awareness
197(3)
Reading Nursery Rhymes and Other Text with Language Play
197(2)
Making Rhymes
199(1)
Reading and Constructing Alphabet Books
200(1)
Another Look: The Teacher's Roles
200(1)
Chapter Summary
201(1)
Applying the Information
202(1)
Going Beyond the Text
202(1)
References
202(3)
8 Supporting Literacy Learning in earning In Kindergarten
205(40)
Key Concepts
205(1)
The Kindergarten Context: What's New Here?
206(4)
What Kindergartners Learn about Literacy
206(1)
The Teacher's Role
207(1)
The Kindergarten Setting: Space and Materials
208(2)
Talking and Writing Together in Mrs. Poremba's Classroom
210(4)
Counting Days of School
210(1)
Talking about One Hundred
210(1)
Shared Writing of a Reminding Note
211(2)
Lessons from This Shared Writing Episode
213(1)
Helping Children Attend to Sounds in Words
214(8)
The "What Can You Show Us?" Activity
215(4)
"Rounding Up the Rhymes"
219(3)
Kindergarten Experiences with Reading
222(8)
Using Classroom Print
222(2)
Shared Reading
224(2)
Shared Reading with Big Books
226(4)
Kindergarten Experiences with Writing
230(7)
Journal Writing
230(1)
The Extended Sign-in Procedure
231(2)
Shared Writing
233(4)
Kindergarten Experiences with Play
237(4)
Dramatic-Play-with-Print Centers
237(3)
Dramatizing Informational Books
240(1)
Another Look: The Teacher's Roles
241(1)
Chapter Summary
242(1)
Applying the Information
243(1)
Going Beyond the Text
243(1)
References
243(2)
9 Supporting Literacy Learning in First Grade
245(41)
Key Concepts
245(1)
What's New Here?
246(2)
Reading and Writing in Five First-Grade Classrooms
248(24)
Guided Reading Instruction in Mrs. Tran's First Grade
248(11)
Reading in Mrs. Walker's First Grade
259(8)
Writing in Mr. Schultheis's First Grade
267(2)
Informational Writing in Mrs. Duthie's First Grade
269(2)
Poetry Writing in Mrs. Zickuhr's First Grade
271(1)
Exemplary First-Grade Literacy Instruction
272(10)
Exemplary Teaching Means Lots of Instruction
272(1)
How Explicit Phonics Instruction Is Delivered
273(1)
Balanced Instruction
274(1)
Exemplary Writing Instruction
274(6)
Summary: Effective First-Grade Literacy Instruction
280(2)
Chapter Summary
282(1)
Applying the Information
283(1)
Going Beyond the Text
283(1)
References
283(3)
10 Supporting Literacy Learning Beyond First Grade
286(31)
Key Concepts
286(1)
What's New Here?
287(2)
Increasing Expectations for Traditional Skills, Child-Centered Classrooms, and New Competencies
287(1)
A Balanced Reading and Writing Program
288(1)
Components of a Balanced Reading and Writing Program
288(1)
Shared Reading and Reading Aloud
289(4)
Explicit Teaching of Decoding and Vocabulary in Shared Reading
289(1)
Explicit Teaching of Comprehension during Reading Aloud
290(3)
Writing and Reading Workshop, Book Clubs, and Guided Reading
293(12)
Writing Workshop
293(3)
Reading Workshop
296(2)
Book Clubs
298(2)
Guided Reading
300(5)
Reading and Writing Poetry
305(1)
Enjoying Poetry: Developing Fluency
305(1)
Poetic Elements
306(1)
Poetry and Technology
306(1)
Reading and Writing Informational Text
306(5)
Comprehension of Informational Books
307(1)
Inquiry Units
307(1)
Writing Informational Texts
308(1)
Content-Specific Vocabulary
309(1)
Internet Workshop and Inquiry Learning
310(1)
Learning Conventions
311(2)
Word Study
311(1)
Spelling Programs
312(1)
Chapter Summary
313(1)
Applying the Information
314(1)
Going Beyond the Text
314(1)
References
314(3)
11 Diverse Learners
317(33)
Key Concepts
317(1)
Learners at Risk
318(5)
Characteristics That Put Children at Risk
318(4)
At-Risk Revisited
322(1)
Special-Needs Learners
323(3)
Supporting Special-Needs Children's Literacy
323(2)
Avoiding Reductionist Teaching
325(1)
Learners from Diverse Cultural Backgrounds
326(6)
Cultural Influences on Learning
326(1)
Culturally Responsive Instruction
327(2)
Culturally Sensitive Instruction: A Summary
329(1)
Culturally Sensitive Instruction in Multicultural Settings
329(3)
Children from Diverse Language Backgrounds
332(12)
Learners Who Speak Nonmainstream Dialects of English
333(4)
Learners Who Speak English as a Second Language
337(6)
Issues Related to Teaching Children from Diverse Backgrounds
343(1)
Chapter Summary
344(1)
Applying the Information
345(1)
Going Beyond the Text
346(1)
References
346(4)
12 Assessment
350(36)
Key Concepts
350(1)
A Day in Kindergarten
351(5)
A Day in Ms. Orlando's Classroom
351(3)
Ms. Orlando Reflects and Plans
354(2)
Effective Classroom Assessment
356(6)
Components of a Portfolio
356(3)
Using Scoring Rubrics as Assessment Tools
359(1)
Using Portfolios
359(3)
Screening and Monitoring Literacy Development
362(18)
Essential Components of Reading and Writing
362(2)
Concepts-about-Print Tasks
364(1)
Alphabet Recognition Tasks
365(1)
Phonemic Awareness Tasks
365(1)
Assessing Alphabetic and Orthographic Principle Use in Decoding and Spelling
366(2)
Assessing Comprehension and Vocabulary
368(5)
Assessing Children's Ability to Read Texts of Increasing Difficulty
373(4)
Analyzing Children's Ability to Write Texts of Increasing Complexity
377(3)
Chapter Summary
380(1)
Applying the Information
381(1)
Going Beyond the Text
381(3)
References
384(2)
APPENDIX: Children's Literature 386(5)
Author Index 391(7)
Subject Index 398


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