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Literature of the Western World, Volume I The Ancient World Through the Renaissance,9780130186669
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Literature of the Western World, Volume I The Ancient World Through the Renaissance

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780130186669

ISBN10:
013018666X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/29/2000
Publisher(s):
Longman
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    Literature of the Western World : The Ancient World Through the Renaissance




Summary

The most comprehensive best-selling anthology of its kind, this two-volume survey enables readers to choose among the most important canonical and less-familiar texts of the Western literary tradition in Europe and the Americas. It offers complete texts whenever possible, uses the best translations of foreign-language material, and, when appropriate, presents more than one text by each author.It provides detailed historical and biographical notes and introductions to six literary periods: The Ancient World; the Middle Ages; the Renaissance; Neoclassicism and Romanticism; Realism and Naturalism; and Modern and Contemporary.Individuals interested in a comprehensive look at Western literature through the ages.

Table of Contents

Preface xxi
The Ancient World 1(15)
Introduction
1(15)
Gilgamesh (c. 2000 s.c.) 16(49)
Gilgamesh
19(46)
Danny P. Jackson
Tablet I
20(6)
Tablet II
26(2)
Tablet III
28(3)
Tablet IV
31(2)
Tablet V
33(2)
Tablet VI
35(4)
Tablet VII
39(3)
Tablet VIII
42(4)
Tablet IX
46(3)
Tablet X
49(5)
Tablet XI
54(7)
Tablet XII
61(4)
The Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) (Tenth Century B.C. to Second Century B.C.) 65(62)
The Old Testament
68(59)
King James Version
From Genesis
68(23)
The Creation of the World
68(1)
The Fall
69(3)
Cain and Abel
72(1)
The Flood
73(3)
The Tower of Babel
76(1)
The Story of Abraham and Isaac
77(2)
The Story of Jacob
79(12)
From Job
91(30)
From Psalms
121(6)
Psalm 8
121(1)
Psalm 23
121(1)
Psalm 91
122(1)
Psalm 103
123(1)
Psalm 114
124(1)
Psalm 130
124(1)
Psalm 137
125(1)
Psalm 139
126(1)
Homer (Eighth Century B.C.) 127(468)
From The Iliad
132(141)
Robert Fitzgerald
Book One: Quarrel, Oath, and Promise
134(17)
From Book Six: Interludes in Field and City
151(9)
Book Nine: A Visit of Emissaries
160(20)
From Book Twelve: The Rampart Breached
180(2)
Book Sixteen: A Ship Fired, a Tide Turned
182(23)
From Book Seventeen: Contending for a Soldier Fallen
205(1)
Book Eighteen: The Immortal Shield
206(17)
Book Nineteen: The Avenger Fasts and Arms
223(14)
Book Twenty-Two: Desolation Before Troy
237(12)
Book Twenty-Four: A Grace Given in Sorrow
249(24)
The Odyssey
273(322)
Robert Fitzgerald
Book One: A Goddess Intervenes
273(12)
Book Two: A Hero's Son Awakens
285(11)
Book Three: The Lord of the Western Approaches
296(13)
Book Four: The Red-Haired King and His Lady
309(21)
Book Five: Sweet Nymph and Open Sea
330(12)
Book Six: The Princess at the River
342(8)
Book Seven: Gardens and Firelight
350(8)
Book Eight: The Songs of the Harper
358(15)
Book Nine: New Coasts and Poseidon's Son
373(14)
Book Ten: The Grace of the Witch
387(15)
Book Eleven: A Gathering of Shades
402(18)
Book Twelve: Sea Perils and Defeat
420(13)
Book Thirteen: One More Strange Island
433(13)
Book Fourteen: Hospitality in the Forest
446(14)
Book Fifteen: How They Came to Ithaka
460(15)
Book Sixteen: Father and Son
475(14)
Book Seventeen: The Beggar at the Manor
489(18)
Book Eighteen: Blows and a Queen's Beauty
507(12)
Book Nineteen: Recognitions and a Dream
519(16)
Book Twenty: Signs and a Vision
535(11)
Book Twenty-0ne: The Test of the Bow
546(11)
Book Twenty-Two: Death in the Great Hall
557
Book Twenty-Three: The Trunk of the Olive Tree
5'70(580)
Book Twenty-Four: Warriors, Farewell
580(15)
Aesop (Sixth Century B.C.) 595(17)
Fables
597(15)
Olivia
Robert Temple
3: The Eagle and the Fox
597(1)
8: The Nightingale and the Hawk
598(1)
12: The Cat and the Cock
599(1)
20: The Two Cocks and the Eagle
599(1)
21: The Cocks and the Partridge
599(1)
32; The Fox and the Bunch of Grapes
600(1)
40: The Fox and the Billy-Goat
600(1)
52: The Middle-Aged Man and His Mistress
601(1)
58: The Shipwrecked Man
601(1)
59: The Man and the Lion Travelling Together
602(1)
65: The Astronomer
602(1)
78: The North Wind and the Sun
602(1)
76: The House-Ferret and Aphrodite
603(1)
96: The Orator Demades
603(1)
185: The Kite and the Snake
604(1)
150: The Crab and the Fox
604(1)
151: The Crab and Her Mother
604(1)
162: The Jackdaw and the Birds
605(1)
165: The Raven and the Fox
605(1)
180: The Dog, the Cock, and the Fox
606(1)
185: The Dog Who Carried the Meat
606(1)
192: The Hare and the Fox
607(1)
194: The Lioness and the Vixen
607(1)
205: The Lion, the Wolf, and the Fox
607(1)
206: The Lion and the Mouse Who Returned a Kindness
608(1)
209: The Lion, the Ass, and the Fox
608(1)
221: The Wolf and the Lamb
609(1)
224: The Wolf and the Heron
609(1)
241: The Ant and the Scarab Beetle
609(1)
243: The Field Mouse and the Town Mouse
610(1)
267: The Ass Clothed in the Skin of a Lion, and the Fox
610(1)
287: The Hen That Laid the Golden Eggs
611(1)
318: The Joking Shepherd
611(1)
352: The Tortoise and the Hare
611(1)
Aeschylus (c. 525-456 B.C.) 612(129)
The Oresteia
615(126)
Robert Fagles
Agamemnon
616(53)
The Libation Bearers
669(36)
The Eumenides
705(36)
Sophocles (496-406 B.C.) 741(98)
Oedipus the King
743(48)
Stephen Berg
Diskin Clay
Antigone
791(48)
Robert Fagles
Euripides (c. 480-406 B.C.) 839(72)
Medea
844(33)
Philip Vellacott
Helen
877(34)
Philip Vellacott
Aristophanes (c. 450-c. 386 B.C.) 911(56)
Lysistrata
914(53)
Dudley Fitts
Virgil (70-19 s.c.) 967(112)
From The Aeneid
973(106)
Rolfe Humphries
Book I: The Landing near Carthage
973(18)
Book II: The Fall of Troy
991(18)
Book III: The Wanderings of Aeneas
1009(16)
Book IV: Aeneas and Dido
1025(16)
From Book V: The Funeral Games for Anchises
1041(1)
Book VI: The Lower World
1042(24)
From Book VIII: Aeneas at the Site of Rome
1066(3)
From Book XII: The Final Combat
1069(10)
Ovid (43 B.C.-17 A.D.) 1079(51)
From Amores
1083(19)
Peter Green
From Book 1
1083(11)
From Book 2
1094(3)
From Book 3
1097(5)
From Heroides
1102(17)
Daryl Hine
Paris to Helen (XVI)
1103(10)
Helen to Paris (XVII)
1113(6)
Metamorphoses
1119(11)
Rolfe Humphries
From Book I
1119(11)
The Creation
1119(2)
The Four Ages
1121(2)
Jove's Intervention
1123(1)
The Story of Lycaon
1124(1)
The Flood
1125(2)
Deucalion and Pyrrha
1127(3)
The New Testament (First and Second Centuries A.D.) 1130(8)
The New Testament
1133(5)
King James Version
From The Gospel According to Saint Matthew The Sermon on the Mount
1133(5)
Greek and Latin Lyric Poetry (Seventh Century B.C. to Second Century A.D.) 1138(3)
Sappho (Early Sixth Century B.C.) 1141(7)
Poems
1141(7)
Mary Barnard
30: We drink your health
1141(1)
34: Lament for a maidenhead
1142(1)
37: You know the place
1142(1)
38: Prayer to my lady of Paphos
1143(1)
39: He is more than a hero
1144(1)
40: Yes, Atthis, you may be sure
1144(1)
41: To an army wife, in Sardis
1145(1)
42: I have had not one word from her
1146(1)
43: It was you, Atthis, who said
1146(1)
97: I have often asked you
1147(1)
Pindar (518-438 B.C.) 1148(5)
First Olympian Ode
1149(4)
Frank Nisetich
Theocritus (Third Century B.C.) 1153(5)
Idyll l: Song of Thyrsis
1153(5)
Thelma Sargent
Catullus (c. 84-c. 54 B.C.) 1158(9)
Poems
1159(8)
Horace Gregory
1: Who shall receive my new-born book
1159(1)
51: He is changed to a god
1160(1)
3: Dress now in sorrow
1160(1)
5: Come, Lesbia, let us live and love
1161(1)
85: I hate and love
1161(1)
109: My life, my love, you say our love will last forever
1162(1)
99: Egnatius has white teeth
1162(1)
8: Poor damned Catullus
1163(1)
76: If man can find rich consolation
1163(1)
11: Furius, Aurelius, bound to Catullus
1164(1)
62: Twilight and star we hope to see arise
1165(2)
101: Dear brother, I have come these many miles
1167(1)
Horace (65-8 B.C.) 1167(22)
Odes, Book 1
1168(21)
1.1---Translated by David West
1168(2)
1.1---Translated by Anthony Hecht
1170(1)
1.2---Translated by David West
1171(2)
1.2---Translated by Frances Sylvester Mahony
1173(2)
1.3---Translated by David West
1175(1)
1.3---Translated by John Dryden
1176(2)
1.4---Translated by David West
1178(1)
1.4---Translated by Christopher Smart
1179(1)
1.4---Translated by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu
1179(1)
1.5---Translated by David West
1180(1)
1.5---Translated by John Milton
1181(1)
1.5---Translated by Aphra Behn
1181(1)
1.5---Translated by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu
1182(1)
1.6---Translated by David West
1183(1)
1.6---Translated by Patrick Branwell Bronte
1184(1)
1.7---Translated by David West
1184(2)
1.7---Translated by Christopher Smart
1186(1)
1.8---Translated by David West
1187(1)
1.8---Translated by Sir Richard Fanshawe
1187(1)
1.9---Translated by David West
1188(1)
1.9---Translated by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
1189(1)
Propertius (c. 50 B.C.-after 16 B.C.) 1189(8)
Elegies
1190(1)
Book I, no. 6: ``I Am No Ordinary Coward''
1190(1)
Constance Carrier
Book II, no. 15: ``No Man More Blest! ``
1191(2)
Constance Carrier
Book III, no. 16: ``Midnight, and a Letter Comes to Me''
1193(1)
Ezra Pound
Book IV, no. 7: ``A Ghost Is Someone''
1194(3)
Translated by Robert Lowell
Cultural Texts of the Ancient World 1197(1)
Plato (427 c. 341 B.C.) 1197(23)
From The Republic
1197(3)
Benjamin Jowett
The Apology
1200(20)
Benjamin Jowett
Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) 1220(21)
From Nicomachean Ethics
1220(5)
W. D. Ross
From Poetics
1225(16)
Samuel Henry Butcher
Louise Ropes Loomis
Herodotus (490-c. 425 B.V.) 1241(9)
From The History
1241(9)
George Rawlinson
Thucydides (Middle Fifth Century-399 B.C.?) 1250(10)
From The Peloponnesian Wars
1250(10)
Benjamin Jowett
Livy (59 B.C.-A.D. 17) 1260(11)
From The History of Rome
1260(11)
Daniel Spillan
Marcus Aurelius (121-180) 1271(8)
From Meditations
1271(8)
George Long
The Middle Ages 1279(10)
Introduction
1279(10)
The Koran (Qur'an) (Seventh Century) 1289(13)
From The Koran
1292(10)
Arthur J. Arberry
The Opening
1292(1)
From The Cow
1292(1)
Light
1293(4)
Ya Sin
1297(4)
Sincere Religion
1301(1)
The Cattle Raid of Cooley (Seventh Eighth Centuries) 1302(10)
Exile of the Sons of Uisliu
1304(8)
Thomas Kinsella
Hrafnkel the Priest of Frey (Twelfth Fourteenth Centuries) 1312(20)
Hrafnkel the Priest of Frey
1314(18)
Gmyn Jones
Marie de France (Late Twerlfth Century) 1332(30)
Lais
1335(18)
Robert Hanning
Joan Ferrante
Bisclavret (The Werewolf)
1335(6)
Yonec
1341(12)
From Fables
1353(9)
Harriet Spiegel
The Mouse and the Frog
1353(2)
The Frogs Who Asked for a King
1355(1)
The Wolf King
1356(3)
The Peasant and His Jackdaw
1359(1)
The Vole Who Sought a Wife
1360(2)
Epilogue
1362(1)
Renard the Fox (Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries) 1362(36)
From Renard the Fox
1364(34)
Patricia Terry
The Trial of Renard
1364(34)
Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 1398(174)
The Divine Comedy
1405(167)
H. R Huse
Inferno
1405(140)
From Purgatory
1545(18)
From Paradise
1563(9)
The Thousand and the Green Knight (Fourteenth Century) 1572(41)
The Story of Sindbad the Sailor
1575(38)
Husain Haddawy
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Late Fourteenth Century) 1613(57)
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
1615(55)
Theodore Howard Banks, Jr.
Geoffrey Chaucer (1340?-1400) 1670(92)
From The Canterbury Tales
1674(88)
Theodore Morrison
Prologue
1674(18)
Prologue to the Miller's Tale
1692(2)
The Miller's Tale
1694(14)
Prologue to the Wife of Bath's Tale
1708(18)
The Wife of Bath's Tale
1726(8)
Prologue to the Pardoner's Tale
1734(3)
The Pardoner's Tale
1737(10)
The Knight's Interruption of the Monk's Tale
1747(1)
The Nun's Priest's Tale
1748(14)
Christine de Pizan (1364-1430?) 1762(21)
From The Book of the City of Ladies
1765(18)
Earl Jeffrey Richards
Everyman (Late Fifteenth Century) 1783(25)
Everyman
1786(22)
Cultural Texts of the Middle Ages 1808(1)
John of Salisbury (1115?-1180) 1808(2)
From Polycraticus
1808(2)
John Dickinson
Pope Eugene III (d. 1153) 1810(2)
General Summons to a Crusade
1810(2)
Ernest F. Henderson
Usamah Ibn-Munqidh (1095-1188) 1812(7)
From Memoirs
1812(7)
Philip K. Hitti
Andreas Capellanus (Late Twelfth Century) 1819(6)
From The Art of Courtly Love
1819(6)
John Jay Perry
Giraldus Cambrensis (c. 1146-1223) 1825(2)
From The Topography of Ireland
1825(2)
Thomas Wright
Saint Francis of Assis (1182?-1226) 1827(1)
The Canticle of the Sun
1828(1)
Paschal Robinson
Roger Bacon (c. 1214-1294?) 1828(6)
From Opus Majus
1828(6)
Robert Belle Burke
Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) 1834(7)
From Summa Contra Gentiles
1834(7)
English Dominican Fathers
Pope Boniface VII (1235-1301) 1841(2)
The Bull ``Unum Sanctum''
1841(2)
Ernest F. Henderson
``The Goodman of Paris'' (Fourteenth Century) 1843(6)
From The Goodman of Paris
1843(6)
Eileen Power
The Renaissance 1849(16)
Introduction
1849(16)
Francis Petrarch (1304-1374) 1865(11)
Rhymes
1868(8)
Anthony Mortimer
I: All you that hear in scattered rhymes
1868(1)
III: It was that very day on which the sun
1869(1)
XC: Upon the breeze she spread her golden hair
1869(1)
CXXVI: Waters fresh and sweet and clear
1870(2)
CXXIX: From thought to thought, from mountainside to mountain
1872(2)
CXXXIV: I find no peace, and have no arms for war
1874(1)
CCLXV: Fierce heart and bitter, and most cruel will
1874(1)
CCXCII: The eyes I spoke of once in words that burn
1874(1)
CCCLXV: I keep lamenting over days gone by
1875(1)
Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375) 1876(40)
The Decameron
1878(38)
Richard Aldington
The First Day
1878(10)
Third Day, Tenth Tale
1888(6)
Fourth Day, Second Tale
1894(6)
Fifth Day, Tenth Tale
1900(6)
Tenth Day, Tenth Tale
1906(8)
From Conclusion
1914(2)
Marguerite de Navarre (1492-1549) 1916(28)
The Heptameron
1921(23)
P. A. Chilton
Story Eight
1922(4)
Story Eighteen
1926(4)
Story Nineteen
1930(9)
Story Thirty-Six
1939(3)
Story Fifty-Five
1942(2)
Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592) 1944(43)
Essays
1948(39)
Donald M. Frame
Of Cannibals
1948(10)
From Apology for Raymond Sebond
1958(29)
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (1547-1616) 1987(44)
Don Quixote
1990(41)
Walter Starkie
From Part I
1990(41)
William Shakespeare (1564-1616) 2031(68)
The Tempest
2036(63)
John Milton (1608-1674) 2099(104)
Paradise Lost
2104(99)
From Book I
2105(11)
From Book II
2116(14)
From Book III
2130(7)
From Book IV
2137(19)
Book IX
2156(29)
From Book X
2185(9)
From Book XII
2194(9)
Renaissance Lyric Poetry (c. 1500-c. 1660) 2203(6)
Garcilaso de la Vega (c. 1501-1536) 2209(1)
Your Face Is Written in My Soul
2209(1)
Edwin Morgan
While There Is Still the Color of a Rose...
2209(1)
Edwin Morgan
Santa Teresa de Jesus (1515-1582) 2210(1)
If, Lord, Thy Love for Me Is Strong
2210(1)
Arthur Symons
Let Nothing Disturb Thee
2210(1)
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Joachim Du Bellay (1522-1560) 2211(1)
Regrets, XXXI
2211(1)
David Sanders
From a Winnower of Wheat to the Winds
2211(1)
David Sanders
Pierre de Ronsard (1524-1585) 2212(2)
To Cassandre
2212(1)
David Sanders
On the Death of Marie
2213(1)
David Sanders
To Helene
2213(1)
David Sanders
Sonnet to an Unnamed Person
2214(1)
David Sanders
Fray Luis de Leon (c. 1527-1591) 2214(4)
Ode to Francisco Salinas
2214(2)
David Sanders
The Life of the Blessed
2216(1)
William Cullen Bryant
At the Ascension
2217(1)
James Edward Tobin
The Assumption of the Virgin
2218(1)
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
San Juan de la Cruz (1542-1591) 2218(5)
One Dismal Night
2218(1)
Kate Flores
O Living Flame of Love
2219(1)
Stephen Stepanchev
I Entered Where I Did Not Know
2220(2)
Willis Barnstone
A Shepherd, Young and Mournful, Grieves Alone...
2222(1)
James Edward Tobin
I Know Full Well the Water's Flowing Power...
2222(1)
James Edward Tobin
Edmund Spenser (1552-1599) 2223(11)
Epthalamion
2223(11)
Luis de Gongora (1561-1627) 2234(5)
A Rose
2234(1)
Sir Richard Fanshawe
A Nightingale
2235(1)
Sir Richard Fanshawe
The Spring
2235(1)
Sir Richard Fanshawe
Soar High, My Love
2236(1)
Sir Richard Fanshawe
Life's Greatest Misery. Addressed to a Friend on His Marriage
2236(1)
Edward Churton
Allegory of the Brevity of Things Human
2237(1)
Roy Campbell
The Rosemary Spray
2238(1)
Edward Churton
Bartolome Leonardo de Argensola (1562-1631) 2239(1)
I Must Confess, Don Juan
2239(1)
James Young Gibson
Mary Magdalene
2240(1)
William Cullen Bryant
Lope de Vega (1562-1635) 2240(5)
The Good Shepherd
2240(1)
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Tomorrow
2241(1)
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
At Dawn the Virgin Is Born...
2241(1)
W. S. Merwin
Ice and Fires Contend with My Child...
2242(1)
W. S.
Where, Are You Going, Maiden...?
2243(1)
W. S. Merwin
A Little Carol of the Virgin
2243(1)
Denise Levertov
A Sonnet All of a Sudden
2244(1)
Doreen Bell
Michael Drayton (1563-1631) 2245(1)
How Many Paltry, Foolish, Painted Things
2245(1)
Since There's No Help
2245(1)
William Shakespeare (1564-1616) 2246(3)
Sonnet 18: Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
2246(1)
Sonnet 30: When to the sessions of sweet silent thought
2246(1)
Sonnet 64: When I have seen by Time's fell hand defaced
2247(1)
Sonnet 73: That time of year thou mayst in me behold
2247(1)
Sonnet 116: Let me not to the marriage of true minds
2247(1)
Sonnet 129: The expense of spirit in a waste of shame
2248(1)
Sonnet 130: My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun
2248(1)
Sonnet 138: When my love swears that she is made of truth
2249(1)
Thomas Campion (1567-1620) 2249(1)
I Care Not for These Ladies
2249(1)
Follow Your Saint
2250(1)
John Donne (1572-1631) 2250
The Good-Morrow
2250
Song
2251
The Canonization
2252
The Funeral
2253
The Flea
2254
A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning
2255
Love's Diet
2256
Elegy XIX: To His Mistress Going to Bed
2257
Holy Sonnets:
2258
X: Death be not proud
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XIV: Batter my heart
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A Hymn to God the Father
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Excerpts

Preface This fifth edition of Literature of the Western Worldintended, as its predecessors were, to provide the best possible materials for courses in the literatures of Europe and America from the earliest times to the present. It is a textbook in the broad sense of "a book of texts," rather than in the narrow one of a book arranged along the lines of a single course. It is a small library of Western literature upon which a wide range of courses might be based and which students might preserve after a particular class is over as a useful part of their personal libraries. Through the successive incarnations of the book, the editors have clung to a quite personal conception of their roles as participants in a conversation with instructors and students who use the book, and they have made choices of texts and presentation accordingly. In such a conversation, the first question is, inevitably, "What shall we read?" This text is limited to the literatures of Europe and America and thus is designed either for courses in Western literature or for the Western portions of courses in global literature. The editors are acutely aware that the West is not the world and that a course in Western literature, even a two-semester one, should be part of a curriculum that includes non-Western literature as well, preferably with books that treat the literatures of East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and South America as thoroughly as this one does Western literature. Even within Western literature, two volumes, thick as they are, can include only a tiny fraction of the most highly regarded and most influential works. The editors have adopted principles of both balance and range in making their hard choices. The text goes from about 2000 B.C. to 2000 A.D., and the editors have tried to represent the earlier periods as fully and fairly as the later ones. The temporal range and balance are matched by a range and balance of literary modes. If the works included were divided into the modes of lyric, narrative, and drama, the result would be three substantial anthologies of poems, stories, and plays. The national literatures within the boundaries of the subject have been represented in a balanced way as well, as far as possible. Balance, too, has been the goal in the representation of "high" and "low" literature (both Oedipus Rexand Aesop''s Fables) and literature by women and men (Marguerite de Navarre as well as Boccaccio, Anna Akhmatova as well as Rainer Maria Rilke). The way the texts are presented has been as important to the editors as their selection. The editors are aware that most students who use Literature of the Western Worldare encountering the works in it for the first time. Therefore, they try to make the initial encounter as rich and meaningful as possible. This means that translations of works in languages other than English must be carefully chosen, not only for accuracy but also for readability and, above all, for capturing the literary quality of the original as vividly as possible. Robert Fitzgerald''s translations of the Iliadand the Odyssey,the longest selection from a single author in the anthology, achieve these goals, as do Robert Fagles''s and Phillip Vellacott''s translations of Greek tragedy, H. R. Huse''s translation of the Divine Comedy,Louise and Aylmer Maude''s translations of Tolstoy, and Stephen Mitchell''s translations of Rilke. In a number of cases, we have been able to include translations by distinguished writers in their own right. Thus the Irish poets Thomas Kinsella and Derek Mahon translate the Irish Tainand the poems of Gerard de Nerval; the American poets Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, William Cullen Bryant, W. S. Merwin, and Denise Levertov translate some of the Renaissance lyrics; Marianne Moore and Richard Wilbur translate La Fontaine and Moliere respectively; and Randall Jarrell translates Faust.The great English novelist Tobias Smollett translates Voltaire, his contemporary; and D. M. Thomas translates both Alexander Pushkin and Anna Akhmatova. Such pairings of congenial temperaments often result in happy blendings that read like original works. Introductions and annotations are also intended to help the student feel at home in the often remote and unfamiliar worlds of the writers. Extensive period introductions survey historical events and provide syntheses of the thematic and aesthetic preoccupations of each period. Detailed introductions to individual authors and works place each work in the context of its author''s life and times and suggest what to look out for in a first reading without giving away the content or imposing a single interpretation. Annotations are economical and factual rather than interpretive but ample enough to minimize trips to the dictionary or encyclopedia. The fifth edition retains much from the previous editions, especially texts that instructors told us were especially important in a course in Western literature, but it also includes a great deal of new material. The most striking innovation is perhaps the sections of "Cultural Texts" for each period. These are made up of selections that, though they may have considerable literary value themselves, are likely to be read principally for their ideas rather than their literary merits. A few of these are works of literary theory, such as Aristotle''s Poetics,Boileau''s Art of Poetry,and the selection from Raymond Williams''s The Long Revolution.Most, though, are works of philosophy, history, political science, and other nonliterary fields that express directly some of the ideas that poets, storytellers, and playwrights express indirectly. A total of forty-three of these cultural texts appear in the two volumes as illuminating companion pieces to the works of literature proper. A second structural change is not strictly new but represents an expansion of features of the earlier editions: a number of sections of lyric poetry in both volumes, a series of minianthologies within the anthology. The fourth edition included such a section of French Symbolist and Modernist Poetry. This edition adds similar sections of Greek and Latin Lyric Poetry, Renaissance Lyric Poetry, and Romantic Lyric Poetry. Some of the poets included in these sections appeared separately in previous editions; placing them in the contexts of their contemporaries considerably enriches our reading of them. A third new feature of the book is greater attention to popular literature. There is a temptation in compressing all of Western literature into two volumes to focus on the most heroic works, often aristocratic in origin. But the "high" literature of the West has always been accompanied by the "low," and we have tried to acknowledge its presence by including such popular forms as folktales, beast fables, and tales of wonder throughout the two volumes. Thus in Volume I Aesop''s fables follow the Odyssey,the medieval beast-epic Renard the Foxfollows the Laisof Marie de France, and the Thousand and One Nightsfollows the Divine Comedy.Folk tales in sophisticated retellings appear near the beginning and near the end of Volume II, in La Fontaine''s suave, ironic Fablesand Calvino''s Italian Folktales,in which folk tradition meets postmodernism. A number of other changes are local rather than structural. Euripides''s extraordinary Helenis a metaplay that forms a good companion piece not only to the horrific Medeabut also to Homer''s account of Helen in the Iliadand the Odyssey. Beowulfhas given way to a selection from the Irish national epic The Cattle Raid of Cooleyand an Icelandic saga. Strong recent postcolonialist readings of Shakespeare''s The Tempestled us to substitute it for Henry IV, Part 1(though postcolonial themes are not absent from that play,


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