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The Little Brown Reader,9780321330741

The Little Brown Reader

by ; ;
Edition:
10th
ISBN13:

9780321330741

ISBN10:
0321330749
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $81.20

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Summary

The Little, Brown Reader,one of the best-known and most respected thematic readers available today, continues its tradition of excellence by bringing together contemporary and classic readings with extensive critical reading and writing instruction and numerous illustrations. The strength of The Little, Brown Reader has always been its distinctive collection of readings and its unmatched apparatus; the Tenth Edition enhances both features, further improving the text's focus on critical thinking and writing. Little Brown works in every classrooma range of themes and a flexible format encourage a variety of teaching styles. The readings are well balanced with selections by well-known writers, new writers, and students.

Table of Contents

Rhetorical Contents xix
Preface xxv
1 A Writer Reads
1(18)
Previewing
2(1)
Skimming
3(3)
J.H. Plumb
The Dying Family
6(4)
Highlighting, Underlining, Annotating
10(3)
Summarizing
13(1)
Critical Thinking: Analyzing the Text
14(2)
Tone and Persona
16(3)
2 A Reader Writes
19(24)
C.S. Lewis
We Have No "Right to Happiness"
20(4)
Responding to an Essay
24(1)
The Writing Process
25(5)
Keeping a Journal
26(1)
Questioning the Text Again
27(1)
Summaries, Jottings, Outlines, and Lists
28(2)
Getting Ready to Write a Draft
30(6)
Drafting an Essay: On "We Have No 'Right to Happiness-
30(2)
Revising and Editing a Draft
32(1)
A Revised Draft: Persuasive Strategies in C.S. Lewis's "We Have No 'Right to Happiness-
33(2)
Rethinking the Thesis: Preliminary Notes
35(1)
The Final Version: Style and Argument: An Examination of C. S. Lewis's "We Have No 'Right to Happiness'"
36(7)
A Brief Overview of the Final Version
39(10)
A CHECKLIST FOR ANALYZING AND EVALUATING AN ESSAY THAT YOU ARE WRITING ABOUT
40(3)
3 Academic Writing
43(28)
Kinds of Prose
44(1)
More about Critical Thinking: Analysis and Evaluation
45(4)
Joining the Conversation: Writing about Differing Views
49(7)
Writing about Essays Less Directly Related: A Student's Notes and Journal Entries
51(2)
The Student's Final Version: Two Ways of Thinking about Today's Families
53(3)
Interviewing
56(4)
Guidelines for Conducting the Interview and Writing the Essay
56(3)
Topics for Writing
59(1)
Using Quotations
60(1)
Avoiding Plagiarism
61(7)
Acknowledging Sources
61(4)
Fair Use of Common Knowledge
65(1)
"But How Else Can I Put It?"
65(3)
A CHECKLIST FOR AVOIDING PLAGIARISM
66(1)
A CHECKLIST FOR EDITING: THIRTEEN QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF
67(1)
Mark Edmundson
How Teachers Can Stop Cheaters
68(3)
4 Writing an Argument
71(34)
The Aims of an Argumentative Essay
73(1)
Negotiating Agreements: The Approach of Carl R. Rogers
73(6)
A CHECKLIST FOR ROGERIAN ARGUMENT
78(1)
Three Kinds of Evidence: Examples, Testimony, Statistics
79(3)
Examples
79(2)
Testimony
81(1)
Statistics
81(1)
How Much Evidence Is Enough?
82(1)
Avoiding Fallacies
82(4)
Drafting an Argument
86(3)
Imagining an Audience
86(1)
Getting Started
86(1)
Writing a Draft
87(1)
Revising a Draft
88(1)
Organizing an Argument
89(1)
A Word about Beginnings and Endings
89(1)
Persona and Style
90(1)
An Overview: An Examination of an Argument
91(1)
Richard Rhodes
Hollow Claims about Fantasy Violence
91(6)
The Analysis Analyzed
93(4)
Two Arguments for Analysis
97(1)
Gary Shapiro
Lasting Impression-Downloading Is Illegal
97(3)
Cary Sherman
Perspective: Honest Talk about Downloads
100(8)
A CHECKLIST FOR REVISING DRAFTS OF ARGUMENTS
104(1)
5 Reading and Writing about Pictures
105(30)
The Language of Pictures
106(1)
Writing about Art
107(1)
Writing about an Advertisement
108(2)
A CHECKLIST FOR ANALYZING ADVERTISEMENTS
110(1)
Writing about a Political Cartoon
110(2)
A CHECKLIST FOR ANALYZING POLITICAL CARTOONS
111(1)
Lou Jacobs Jr.
What Qualities Does a Good Photograph Have?
112(5)
"A little honest controversy about the visual success of a print or slide can be a healthy thing."
Three Essays by Students
116(1)
Joan Daremo
Edvard Munch's The Scream
117(2)
Zoe Morales
Dancing at Durango
119(5)
Jason Green
Did Dorothea Lange Pose Her Subject for Migrant Mother?
124(9)
Last Words: Photographers on Photography
133(2)
6 All in the Family
135(78)
ILLUSTRATIONS
Joanne Leonard
Sonia
136(1)
Pablo Picasso
The Acrobat's Family with a Monkey
137(1)
SHORT VIEWS
138(2)
Anonymous (William James?), Marcel Proust, Leo Tolstoy, James Boswell, Jessie Bernard, Jane Austen
Lewis Coser
The Family
140(1)
A sociologist defines the family and, in fewer than five hundred words, gives an idea of its variety.
Francis Bacon
Of Marriage and Single Life
141(2)
"Wives are young men's mistresses, companions for middle age, and old men's nurses."
Joan Didion
On Going Home
143(3)
Is going home-is leaving home-possible?
Gabrielle Glaser
Scenes from an Intermarriage
146(5)
The author of a book on interfaith marriage believes that, although the future always looks bright, down the road someone usually loses.
Anonymous
Confessions of an Erstwhile Child
151(5)
Should children have the legal right to escape impossible families? A victim argues that a closely bound family structure compounds craziness.
Julie Matthaei
Political Economy and Family Policy
156(12)
The "natural" family system is inadequate, oppressive, and is coming apart at the seams.
Katharine Graham
On Money, Religion, and Sex
168(4)
In her account of her "strange childhood," Katharine Graham discloses "the feeling, which we all shared to some extent, of believing we were never quite going about things correctly."
Arlie Hochschild
The Second Shift: Employed Women Are Putting in Another Day of Work at Home
172(5)
At home, there's a "leisure gap" between men and women.
Judy Brady
I Want a Wife
177(3)
A wife looks at the services she performs and decides that she'd like a wife.
Black Elk
High Horse's Courting
180(5)
An Oglala Sioux holy man tells us what a hard time, in the old days, a young man had getting the girl he wanted.
Josh Quittner
Keeping Up with Your Kids
185(6)
To spy or spy not? Should parents use software to monitor their children's online activities, or are there better ways to protect children?
Celia E. Rothenberg
Child of Divorce
191(5)
An undergraduate reflects on the impact of divorce on her, her brother, and her parents.
Jamaica Kincaid
Girl (story)
196(2)
"Try to walk like a lady and not like the slut you are so bent on becoming."
Robert Hayden
Those Winter Sundays (poem)
198(1)
"No one ever thanked him."
A Casebook on Gay Marriage
199(14)
Ellen Willis
Can Marriage Be Saved?
199(1)
"Marriage [whether heterosexual or homosexual], in the sense of a ceremonial commitment of people to merge their lives, is properly a social ritual reflecting religious or personal conviction, and should not have legal status."
Andrew Sullivan
Here Comes the Groom: A (Conservative) Case for Gay Marriage
201(1)
"But gay marriage is not a radical step. It avoids the mess of domestic partnership: it is humane; it is conservative in the best sense of the word."
Lisa Schiffren
Gay Marriage, an Oxymoron
206(1)
"For most Americans, the marital union-as distinguished from other sexual relationships and legal and economic partnerships-is imbued with an aspect of holiness."
Anonymous
Gay Marriage in the States (editorial)
208(2)
Marcy E. Feller and Bill Banuchi
Letters Responding to Anonymous Editorial on Gay Marriage
210(1)
A newspaper editorial suggesting that discussions of gay marriage in the fifty states will provide "social laboratories for the nation" evokes a range of responses.
7 Identities
213(66)
ILLUSTRATIONS
Dorothea Lange
Grandfather and Grandchildren Awaiting Evacuation Bus, Hayward, California
214(1)
Marion Post Wolcott
Behind the Bar, Birney, Montana
215(1)
SHORT VIEWS
216(2)
Margaret Mead, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Simone de Beauvoir, Israel Zangwill, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Vladimir I. Lenin, Joyce Carol Oates, Martin Luther King Jr., Zora Neale Hurston, Shirley Chisholm
Stephen Jay Gould
Women's Brains
218(5)
On the "irrelevant and highly injurious" biological labeling of women and other disadvantaged groups.
Katha Pollitt
Why Boys Don't Play with Dolls
223(3)
Social conditioning, not biology, is the answer, this author says.
Paul Theroux
The Male Myth
226(4)
"It is very hard to imagine any concept of manliness that does not belittle women."
Bharati Mukherjee
Two Ways to Belong in America
230(3)
A native of India, now a long-time resident and citizen of the United States, compares her responses to adjusting to life in America with those of her sister, also a U. S. resident but not a citizen.
Emily Tsao
Thoughts of an Oriental Girl
233(2)
A college sophomore questions the value of describing Asian Americans and other minorities as "people of color."
Gloria Naylor
A Question of Language
235(3)
What does the word "nigger" mean?
Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston
Double Identity
238(7)
"In my family, to serve another could be uplifting, a gracious gesture that elevated oneself. For many white Americans it seems that serving another is degrading, an indication of dependency or weakness in character, or a low place on the social ladder."
Richard Rodriguez (with Scott London)
A View from the Melting Pot
245(6)
"In the LA of the future, no one will need say, 'Let's celebrate diversity.' Diversity is going to be a fundamental part of our lives."
David Brooks
People Like Us
251(5)
"People show few signs of being truly interested in building diverse communities....People want to be around others who are roughly like themselves."
Brent Staples
The "Scientific" War on the Poor
256(3)
The ugly politics of I.Q.
Amy Tan
Snapshot: Lost Lives of Women
259(3)
The writer examines "a picture of secrets and tragedies."
Pat Mora
Immigrants (poem)
262(1)
The hopes of immigrant parents.
A Casebook on Race
263(16)
Columbia Encyclopedia
Race
263(1)
An encyclopedia defines race and distinguishes it from racism.
Sharon Begley
Three Is Not Enough
265(1)
"Changing our thinking about race will require a revolution in thought as profound, and profoundly unsettling, as anything science has ever demanded."
Shelby Steele
Hailing While Black
270(1)
"The real debate over racial profiling is not about stops and searches on the New Jersey Turnpike. It is about the degree of racism in America and the distribution of power it justifies."
Randall Kennedy
Blind Spot
272(1)
Those who debate the pros and cons of racial profiling ought to acknowledge "the simple truth that their adversaries have something useful to say."
Stanley Crouch
Race Is Over
274(1)
Ten decades up the road, few people will take seriously, accept, or submit to any forms of segregation that are marching along under the intellectually ragged flag of "diversity."
Countee Cullen
Incident (poem)
278(1)
A grown man remembers only one thing from his childhood visit to Baltimore.
8 Teaching and Learning
279(104)
ILLUSTRATIONS
Winslow Homer
Blackboard
280(1)
Ron James
The Lesson-Planning a Career
281(1)
SHORT VIEWS
282(5)
Francis Bacon, Paul Goodman, Paul B. Diederich, Hasidic Tale, William Cory, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Emma Goldman, Jesse Jackson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Alan Watts, D. H. Lawrence, Prince Kropotkin, John Ruskin, Confucius, Anonymous Zen Anecdote, Joseph Wood Krutch, Phyllis Bottome
Plato
The Myth of the Cave
287(7)
A great teacher explains in a metaphor the progress of the mind from opinion to knowledge.
Richard Wright
Writing and Reading
294(11)
"My reading had created a vast sense of distance between me and the world in which I lived."
Richard Rodriguez
Public and Private Language
305(5)
By age seven, Richard Rodriguez learns "the great lesson of school, that I had a public identity."
Maya Angelou
Graduation
310(10)
A dispiriting commencement address and a spontaneous reaction to it.
Neil Postman
Order in the Classroom
320(6)
"School is not a radio station or a television program."
Robert Coles
On Raising Moral Children
326(5)
A psychiatrist discusses the ways in which adults shape children's behavior.
Mary Field Belenky, Blythe McVicker Clinchy, Nancy Rule Goldberger, and Jill Mattuck Tarule
How Women Learn
331(3)
"Every woman, regardless of age, social class, ethnicity, and academic achievement, needs to know that she is capable of intelligent thought...."
Fan Shen
The Classroom and the Wider Culture
334(10)
According to Fan Shen, who migrated from China to Nebraska, "To try to be 'myself,' which I knew was a key to learning English composition, meant not to be my Chinese self at all."
David Gelernter
Unplugged
344(3)
A professor of computer science offers a surprising comment: "The computer's potential to do good is modestly greater than a book's in some areas. Its potential to do harm is vastly greater, across the board."
Hubert B. Herring
On the Eve of Extinction: Four Years of High School
347(2)
What can be done to overcome high school "senior slump"?
Nadya Labi
Classrooms for Sale
349(7)
Should schools let Campbell's soup pay for the overhead projector?
Amy Tan
In the Canon, for All the Wrong Reasons
352(4)
An Asian-American writer is not altogether comfortable now that her book is required reading.
Dave Eggers
Serve or Fail
356(4)
Colleges-except perhaps community colleges, whose students "have considerable family and work demands"-should require students to perform community service. "Perhaps every 25 hours of service could be traded for one class credit, with a maximum of three credits a year."
Brent Staples
What Adolescents Miss When We Let Them Grow Up in Cyberspace
360(2)
Life lessons don't come in a virtual form.
Stanley Fish
Why We Built the Ivory Tower
362(3)
"The practices of responsible citizenship and moral behavior should be encouraged in our young adults-but it's not the business of the university to do so, except when the morality in question is the morality that penalizes cheating, plagiarism and shoddy teaching...."
Wu-tsu Fa-yen
Zen and the Art of Burglary (story)
365(1)
A teacher tells a story to teach what otherwise cannot be taught.
Toni Cade Bambara
The Lesson (story)
366(7)
A city kid begins to learn about money.
A Casebook on Testing and Grading
373(10)
Paul Goodman
A Proposal to Abolish Grading
373(1)
"Grading hinders teaching and creates a bad spirit."
Diane Ravitch
In Defense of Testing
376(1)
"Tests and standards are a necessary fact of life."
Joy Alonso
Two Cheers for Examinations
378(1)
"After reading all of the essays I felt pretty good, I felt something of the satisfaction that I hope students felt after they finished writing their examinations."
9 Work and Play
383(68)
ILLUSTRATIONS
Dorothea Lange
Lettuce Cutters, Salinas Valley
384(1)
Helen Levitt
Children
385(1)
SHORT VIEWS
386(3)
Mark Twain, The Duke of Wellington, Richard Milhouse Nixon, Barbara Ehrenreich, Karl Marx, Smohalla, Lost Star, John Ruskin, Eric Nesterenko, Vince Lombardi, Howard Cosell, George Orwell, Friedrich Nietzsche, Walt Whitman, Ken Bums, Bion
Bertrand Russell
Work
389(6)
A philosopher examines the connections between work and happiness.
W.H. Auden
Work, Labor, and Play
395(2)
In a modern technological society few people have jobs they enjoy, but the prospect of more leisure is not cheerful either.
John Updike
Early Inklings
397(2)
"'You're hired': sweet words, in this life of getting and spending. I have heard them rather rarely...."
Gloria Steinem
The Importance of Work
399(5)
Both men and women have the "human right" to a job. "But women have more cause to fight for it," and have better reasons than "weworkbecausewehaveto."
Felice N. Schwartz
The "Mommy Track" Isn't Anti-Woman
404(2)
A debate on what employees can do to help parents balance careers and family responsibilities.
Pat Schroeder, Lois Brenner, Hope Dellon, Anita M. Harris, Peg McAulay Byrd
Letters Responding to Felice N. Schwartz
406(4)
Virginia Woolf
Professions for Women
410(5)
Women must confront two obstacles on entering new professions.
Henry Louis Gates Jr.
Delusions of Grandeur
415(3)
How many African-American athletes are at work today? "...an African-American youngster has about as much chance of becoming a professional athlete as he or she does of winning the lottery"
Sir Thomas More
Work and Play in Utopia
418(6)
The inventor of the word "utopia" sets forth some ideas about reducing the work week and about the proper use of leisure.
Black Elk
War Games
424(2)
A Sioux remembers the games of his youth.
Marie Winn
The End of Play
426(7)
Childhood, once a time of play, today is increasingly "purposeful, success-oriented, competitive." What are the causes of this change? And what are the consequences of "the end of childhood"?
James Paul Gee
From Video Games, Learning about Learning
433(3)
"If the principles of learning in good video games are good, then better theories of learning are embedded in the video games many children in elementary and particularly in high school play than in the schools they attend."
James C. McKinley Jr.
It Isn't Just a Game: Clues to Avid Rooting
436(6)
A report on how psychologists look at fans.
John Updike
A&P (story)
442(6)
"I said I quit."
W.H. Auden
The Unknown Citizen (poem)
448(4)
"Was he free? Was he happy? The question in absurd."
10 Messages 451(70)
ILLUSTRATIONS
Jill Posener
Born Kicking, Graffiti on Billboard, London
452(1)
Anonymous
Sapolio
453(1)
SHORT VIEWS
454(2)
Voltaire, Marianne Moore, Derek Walcott, Jane Wagner, Emily Dickinson, Howard Nemerov, Wendell Berry, Anonymous, Rosalie Maggio, Benjamin Cardozo, Gary Snyder, Ann Beattie
Abraham Lincoln
Address at the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery
456(1)
A two-minute speech that shows signs of enduring.
Gilbert Highet
The Gettysburg Address
457(6)
A classicist analyzes a speech that we may think we already know well.
Robin Lakoff
You Are What You Say
463(6)
A linguistic double standard turns women into "communicative cripples-damned if we do, and damned if we don't."
Barbara Lawrence
Four-Letter Words Can Hurt You
469(2)
The best-known obscene words are sadistic and dehumanizing-and their object is almost always female.
Edward T. Hall
Proxemics in the Arab World
471(8)
Why Americans and Arabs find each other pushy, rude, or simply incomprehensible.
Deborah Tannen
The Workings of Conversational Style
479(12)
"Our talk is saying something about our relationship."
Steven Pinker
The Game of the Name
491(3)
The author of The Language Instinct says that "people learn a word by witnessing other people using it, so when they use a word, they provide a history of their reading and listening."
James B. Twitchell
The Marlboro Man: The Perfect Campaign
494(7)
The perfect ad campaign.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions
501(5)
The women at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention adopt a new declaration, accusing men of failures and crimes parallel to those that led Jefferson in 1776 to denounce King George III.
Melinda Ledden Sidak
Mob Mentality: Why Intellectuals Love The Sopranos
506(4)
"Could it be that part of the appeal of this show is that Tony Soprano, terrible husband, loutish father, bad citizen...in some sense insists on the distinction between right and wrong?"
Stevie Smith
Not Waving but Drowning (poem)
510(1)
What a dead man was trying to say all his life.
A Casebook on E-Mail
511(11)
Nicholas Negroponte
Being Asynchronous
511(1)
A professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology explains why e-mail is a blessing.
Judith Kleinfeld
Check Your E-Mail; You May Be Fired
512(1)
"Certain kinds of bad news may best be delivered over e-mail."
Rob Nixon
Please Don't E-Mail Me about This Article
514(1)
E-mail is a great convenience, but "I just need periods in my life when it is less relentless and less convenient."
Ed Boland
In Modern E-Mail Romances "Trash" Is Just a Click Away
517(1)
How e-mail has changed dating.
11 Law and Order 521(60)
ILLUSTRATIONS
Bernie Boston
Flower Power
522(1)
Norman Rockwell
The Problem We All Live With
523(1)
SHORT VIEWS
524(3)
African Proverb, Kurt Weis and Michael F. Milakovich, Niccolo Machiavelli, G.C. Lichtenberg, Andrew Fletcher, Samuel Johnson, James Boswell, William Blake, Anatole France, Louis D. Brandeis, H.L. Mencken, Mae West
Thomas Jefferson
The Declaration of Independence
527(8)
"We hold these truths to be self-evident."
Henry David Thoreau
From "Civil Disobedience"
531(4)
"Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison."
Martin Luther King Jr.
Nonviolent Resistance
535(5)
"Violence as a way of achieving racial justice is both impractical and immoral."
Martin Luther King Jr.
Letter from Birmingham Jail
540(14)
An imprisoned civil rights leader argues that victims of unjust laws have the right to break those laws as long as they use nonviolent tactics.
Cathy Booth Thomas
A New Scarlet Letter
554(3)
A Texas judge forces sex offenders to broadcast their crimes with house signs and bumper stickers.
Michael Chabon
Solitude and the Fortresses of Youth
557(3)
A novelist and filmwriter argues that when we censor violent prose, we deny our humanity.
Chesa Boudin
Making Time Count
560(6)
A young man whose parents have been in prison since he was an infant talks about what was done and might be done to assist such families to maintain healthy relationships.
Derek Bok
Protecting Freedom of Expression on the Campus
566(3)
A university president engages with "the problem of trying to reconcile the rights of free speech with the desire to avoid racial tension."
Michael Levin
The Case for Torture
569(3)
"I am not advocating torture as punishment....I am advocating torture as an acceptable measure for preventing future evils."
George Orwell
Shooting and Elephant
572(6)
As a young British police officer in Burma, Orwell learns the true nature of imperialism.
John (?)
The Woman Taken in Adultery (story)
578(1)
"He that is without sin, let him first cast a stone at her."
Mitsuye Yamada
To the Lady (poem)
579(3)
An American woman of Japanese parentage reflects on the internment of Japanese-Americans in 1942.
12 Consuming Desires 581(64)
ILLUSTRATIONS
Grant Wood
American Gothic
582(1)
Richard Hamilton
Just What Is It That Makes Today's Homes So Different, So Appealing?
583(1)
SHORT VIEWS
584(2)
Chinese Proverb, Hebrew Bible, William Blake, Marcel Duchamp, Anonymous, George Bernard Shaw, G.C. Lichtenberg, Diane White, Anonymous, Alison Lurie, Rudi Gernreich, Kenneth Clark, Le Corbusier, Ralph Waldo Emerson
Peter Farb and George Armelagos
The Patterns of Eating
586(4)
The anthropology of table manners.
David Gerard Hogan
Fast Food
590(3)
Despite criticism, "fast food continues its rapid international growth."
Jacob Alexander
Nitrite: Preservative or Carcinogen?
593(10)
An undergraduate's research paper provides food for thought.
Donna Maurer
Vegetarianism
603(3)
An historian offers reflections on what sorts of people are vegetarians, and why.
Paul Goldberger
Quick! Before It Crumbles!
606(3)
An architecture critic looks at cookie architecture.
Peter Singer
Animal Liberation
609(12)
A philosopher argues that we have no right to eat "pieces of slaughtered nonhumans" or to experiment on nonhumans "in order to benefit humanity"
Jonathan Swift
A Modest Proposal
621(7)
An eighteenth-century Irish satirist tells his countrymen how they may make children "sound, useful members of the commonwealth."
Jimmy Carter
My Boyhood Home
628(7)
President Carter recalls his childhood on his family's peanut farm in Plains, Georgia. "There is little doubt that I now recall those days with more fondness than they deserve."
Jane Jacobs
A Good Neighborhood
635(3)
On privacy and contact in the city streets.
E.B. White
The Door (story)
638(4)
A fable about the assaults of progress on the modern psyche
James Wright
Lying in a Hammock at William Duffy's Farm in Pine Island, Minnesota (poem)
642(3)
13 Body and Soul 645(50)
ILLUSTRATIONS
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Place de l'Europe, 1932
646(1)
Ken Gray
Lifted Lotus
647(1)
SHORT VIEWS
648(2)
W.B. Yeats, Napoleon, Walt Whitman, Woody Allen, Epictetus, D.H. Lawrence, Henry David Thoreau, John Locke, Virginia Woolf, Emily Dickinson, Plato, Samuel Johnson, Frederick Douglass, Ray Charles, Friedrich Nietzsche, Oscar Wilde, Nigerian Proverb, Jesus
Anonymous
Muddy Road (story)
650(1)
A Zen anecdote about body and mind.
D.T. Suzuki
What Is Zen?
650(4)
A Japanese Buddhist tries to teach Westerners the nature of enlightenment.
Langston Hughes
Salvation
654(3)
"I was saved from sin when I was going on thirteen. But not really saved. It happened like this."
Henry David Thoreau
Economy
657(11)
"The mass of men live lives of quiet desperation."
Natalie Angier
The Sandbox: Bully for You: Why Push Comes to Shove
668(5)
"It's hard to see how bullying behavior in schools can be eliminated when bullying behavior among adults is not only common but often applauded-at least if it results in wild success."
Robert Santos
My Men
673(5)
A veteran of the Vietnam War recalls hunger, killings, and rape: "It was so horrifying. I tried to think of what I would be like if this took place in my hometown. This may have been a turning point in my life."
Rogelio R. Gomez
Foul Shots
678(3)
A Mexican-American remembers the shame he felt in the presence of Anglos.
Plato
Crito
681(12)
Socrates helps Crito to see that "we ought not to render evil for evil."
Robert Frost
Design (poem)
693(2)
A poet wonders if the universe is governed by a "design of darkness."
Appendix: A Writer's Glossary 695(9)
Photo Acknowledgments 704(1)
Index 705


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