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Lyndon B. Johnson and American Liberalism A Brief Biography with Documents

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780312416331

ISBN10:
0312416334
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Bedford/St. Martin's

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What version or edition is this?
This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 8/1/2006.
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Summary

Whether admired or reviled, Lyndon B. Johnson and his tumultuous administration embodied the principles and contradictions of his era. Taking advantage of newly released evidence, this second edition incorporates a selection of fresh documents, including transcripts of Johnson's phone conversations and conservative reactions to his leadership, to examine the issues and controversies that grew out of Johnson's presidency and have renewed importance today. The voices of Johnson, his aides, his opponents, and his interpreters address the topics of affirmative action, the United States' role in world affairs, civil rights, Vietnam, the Great Society, and the fate of liberal reform. Additional photographs of Johnson in action complement Bruce J. Schulman's rich biographical narrative, and a chronology, an updated bibliographical essay, and new questions for consideration provide pedagogical support.

Author Biography

BRUCE J. SCHULMAN is professor of history and American studies at Boston University. He is the author of The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society, and Politics (2001), a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, and From Cotton Belt to Sunbelt: Federal Policy, Economic Development, and the Transformation of the South, 1938–1980 (1991). A frequent contributor to the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, San Jose Mercury News and numerous other publications, Professor Schulman has held research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History, and the Marjorie Kovler Fund of the Blum-Kovler Foundation. In 2004, the Organization of American Historians named him to its Distinguished Lectureship program. Schulman is currently at work on a volume for the Oxford History of the United States series covering the years 1896–1929.

Table of Contents

Foreword v
Preface vii
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS xvii
PART ONE Introduction: Lyndon B. Johnson and American liberalism 1(178)
1. "The Perfect Roosevelt Man": Young Lyndon Johnson, 1908-1948
5(31)
From the Hill Country to Capitol Hill
6(6)
The New Deal
12(9)
The Best Congressman a District Ever Had
21(3)
Money and Politics, Texas-Sized
24(12)
2. Democratic Leader: Senator Johnson, 1948-1960
36(24)
Shifting Right: Cold War Liberalism
38(6)
"E = LBJ": The Senate Leader
44(5)
Becoming a National Figure: The Leader and the Issues
49(11)
3. "Let Us Continue": LBJ and the Kennedy Legacy, 1960-1964
60(27)
The Vice President
62(3)
Years of Frustration: JFK and the Liberal Agenda
65(4)
"Let Us Continue": The Transition
69(9)
President in His Own Right
78(9)
4. The Great Society
87(24)
Johnsonian Liberalism
88(4)
Chief Legislator
92(8)
The Not-So-Great Society: Implementing LBJ's Program
100(5)
Assessing the Great Society
105(6)
5. Shall We Overcome? LBJ and the Civil Rights Revolution
111(22)
"We Shall Overcome": The Voting Rights Act of 1965
114(4)
Fire in the Streets
118(3)
A New and Bewildering Stage: Toward Affirmative Action
121(8)
LBJ and Civil Rights
129(4)
6. "That Bitch of a War": LBJ and Vietnam
133(34)
"A Fat, Juicy Worm": The United States and Vietnam, 1945-1963
137(5)
Americanizing the War, 1963-1965
142(6)
"Lyndon Johnson's War"
148(4)
The Credibility Gap and the Home Front
152(9)
"No More Vietnams"
161(6)
7. Dumping Johnson: The Decline and Fall of American liberalism
167(12)
Guns, Butter, and Stagflation
168(3)
The End of the Johnson Era
171(8)
PART TWO The Documents 179(94)
"Let Us Continue": Johnson Assumes the Presidency
The Kennedy Legacy: LBJ's First Speech as President
181(4)
1. Lyndon B. Johnson, Address before a Joint Session of the Congress, November 27, 1963
181(4)
The Warren Commission: Johnson Applies "The Treatment" to Senator Russell
185(3)
2. Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard Russell, Phone Conversation, November 29, 1963, 8:55 p.m.
186(2)
Shaping the Debate: LBJ Persuades Washington Post Publisher Katherine Graham
188(3)
3. Lyndon B. Johnson and Katherine Graham, Phone Conversation, December 2, 1963, 11:10 a.m.
189(2)
Perspectives on the Great Society
Launching the Great Society
191(5)
4. Lyndon B. Johnson, Remarks at the University of Michigan, May 22, 1964
192(4)
"A Time for Choosing": A Conservative Criticizes Johnsonian liberalism
196(2)
5. Ronald Reagan, Address on Behalf of Senator Goldwater, October 27, 1964
196(2)
A Poverty Warrior Defends the Great Society
198(9)
6. Joseph A. Califano Jr., How Great Was the Great Society? 1986
199(8)
A Conservative Thinker Assails the Great Society
207(3)
7. George Gilder, From Wealth and Poverty, 1981
207(3)
Poverty: The Statistical Record
210(4)
8. U.S. Census Bureau, Persons below Poverty Level and below 125 Percent of Poverty Level: 1959-2002
211(3)
Racial Conflict and the Civil Rights Revolution
'We Shall Overcome": The Voting Rights Speech
214(6)
9. Lyndon B. Johnson, The American Promise: Special Message to the Congress, March 15, 1965
215(5)
A New Militance in Black America
220(3)
10. James Farmer, "We Must Be in a Position of Power": Address before the CORE National Convention, July 1, 1965
221(2)
From Civil Rights to Affirmative Action
223(7)
11. Lyndon B. Johnson, "To Fulfill These Rights": Commencement Address at Howard University, June 4, 1965
223(7)
War at Home and Abroad: Martin Luther King Jr. Opposes the Vietnam War
230(6)
12. Martin Luther King Jr., "Beyond Vietnam": Speech at Riverside Church Meeting, April 4, 1967
231(5)
Vietnam LBJ
Outlines His War Aims
236(7)
13. Lyndon B. Johnson, Peace without Conquest: Address at Johns Hopkins University, April 7, 1965
236(7)
Johnson Agonizes over Vietnam
243(6)
14. Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard Russell, Phone Conversation, May 27, 1964, 10:55 a.m.
244(5)
The Decision to Escalate: 1965
249(6)
15. Jack Valenti, From A Very Human President, July 1965
250(5)
We Can Win in Vietnam: Hawks Criticize LBJ's Strategy
255(3)
16. James Burnham, What Is the President Waiting For? June 28, 1966
256(2)
The Student Left Opposes LBJ
258(5)
17. Paul Potter, "The Incredible War": Speech at the Washington Antiwar March, April 17, 1965
259(4)
The Establishment Bows Out: Walter Cronkite Calls the War a Stalemate
263(2)
18. Walter Cronkite, Mired in Stalemate, February 27, 1968
263(2)
The End of Liberalism
LBJ Insists on Guns and Butter
265(2)
19. Lyndon B. Johnson, Annual Message to the Congress on the State of the Union, January 12, 1966
266(1)
The liberal Coalition Breaks Up
267
20. George C. Wallace, Speech at Madison Square Garden, October 24, 1968
267
APPENDIXES
An LBJ Chronology (1908-1975)
273(5)
Questions for Consideration
278(2)
Suggestions for Further Reading
280(9)
Index 289


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