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Major Problems in African American History, Volume I,9780669249910
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Major Problems in African American History, Volume I

by ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780669249910

ISBN10:
0669249912
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
12/16/1999
Publisher(s):
Cengage Learning

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Summary

This text introduces students to both primary sources and analytical essays and is designed to encourage critical thinking about the history and culture of African Americans. The book presents a carefully selected group of readings organized to allow students to evaluate primary sources, test the interpretations of distinguished historians, and draw their own conclusions.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Interpreting African-American History
1(35)
Documents
The Brownies' Book Encourages Black Children to Know Their History, 1920
3(1)
Carter G. Woodson on His Goals for Black History, 1922
3(1)
Mary McLeod Bethune Outlines the Objectives of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, 1937
4(2)
John Hope Franklin Explains the Lonely Dilemma of the American Negro Scholar, 1963
6(1)
Vincent Harding on the Differences Between Negro History and Black History, 1971
7(2)
Lucille Clifton on the Nurturing of History, c. 1990
9(27)
Essays
The History of African-American History
10(5)
John Hope Franklin
The Burden of African-American History: Memory, Justice, and a Usable Past
15(9)
David W. Blight
Sites of Memory, Sites of Struggle: The ``Materials'' of History
24(10)
Fath Davis Ruffins
Further Reading
34(2)
Africans and the Slave Trade: Causes and Consequences
36(46)
Documents
A Portuguese Slave Trader Describes a Kidnapping, c. 1440s
38(1)
Slave Raiding on the West African Coast, 1448
39(2)
A Congolese Envoy to Brazil, c. 1643
41(1)
Willem Bosman a Dutch Trader, Describes the Details of Bargaining for Slaves, 1701
42(2)
Willem Snelgrave an English Trader, Describes the Business of Slave Trading and Two Slave Mutinies, 1734
44(5)
Olaudah Equiano an Ibo, Describes His Capture, 1756
49(2)
An Illustration Showing ``Tight-Packing'' for the Middle Passage, c. 1790s
51(31)
Essays
African Societies Were Transformed by the Slave Trade
52(13)
Walter Rodney
African Societies Voluntarily Participated in the Slave Trade
65(16)
John Thornton
Further Reading
81(1)
The Origins of North American Slavery and Racism
82(28)
Documents
John Rolfe Records the Arrival of African Slaves to Virginia, August 1619
83(2)
Anthony Johnson, a Former Slave, Claims His Slave Property, 1655
85(1)
Interracial Sexual Relations and Their Consequences: The Case of Elizabeth Key, 1655--1656
86(3)
An Act to Discriminate Between Africans and Others in Maryland, 1664
89(1)
Francis Payne a Free Negro Property Owner in Colonial Virginia, Bequeaths His Property, 1673
90(1)
Distinguishing Slaves from Indentured Servants in Virginia, 1705
91(19)
Essays
``The Mutual Causation'' of Racism and Slavery
92(7)
Winthrop D. Jordan
The Paradox of Slavery and Freedom
99(9)
Edmund S. Morgan
Further Reading
108(2)
The Origins of African America and the Continuity of African Culture
110(47)
Documents
Olaudah Equiano an Ibo, Discovers the Cultural Diversity of West Africa, 1789
111(2)
Six Advertisements for Virginia Slave Runaways, 1736, 1767
113(2)
Early Slave Conversion Attempts of Francis Le Jau, an Anglican Minister, 1706--1717
115(2)
George Whitefield, a Religious Revivalist, Encourages Conversion and Education, 1740
117(2)
Phyllis Wheatley's Homage to George Whitefield, 1770
119(2)
The Conversion Experience of John Marrant, 1802
121(2)
Landon Carter, a Slavemaster, Confronts the Problem of Slave Conversion, 1776
123(1)
Two Letters from Savannah, Georgia on the Progress of Baptist Churches, 1792, 1800
124(3)
A Grave Decorated in African Style, 1944
127(30)
Essays
How Africans Preserved Their Culture: Culture as Spirit
128(12)
Sterling Stuckey
How White and Black Cultures Merged: Culture as Social Relations
140(16)
Mechal Sobel
Further Reading
156(1)
The Development of a Slave Society in Colonial North America
157(38)
Documents
The Story of Tom, an African Creole, 1727
158(2)
Description of a Slave Rebellion in Stono, South Carolina, 1739
160(2)
Lord Dunmore, a British General, Entices Slaves of Colonial Rebels to Flee, 1775
162(1)
Saul, a Slave Revolutionary Veteran, Petitions for Freedom, 1792
163(1)
Free Blacks in South Carolina Petition for Equal Rights, 1791
163(2)
Hector St. John de Crevecoeur a Traveler, Encounters the Continuing Horror of Slavery in the New Republic, 1782
165(30)
Essays
Historicizing the Slave Experience
166(16)
Ira Berlin
How Africans Became African Americans
182(12)
Allan Kulikoff
Further Reading
194(1)
Subordination and Autonomy: the Dialectics of Master-Slave Relations
195(50)
Documents
Thomas Cobb, an Antebellum Scholar, Describes Legal Basis for Slavery, 1858
196(4)
Thomas Ruffin, a Judge, Struggles with Illogic of Slaves as Property and as Persons, 1829
200(3)
South Carolina Governor James Henry Hammond, a Slaveowner, Instructs His Overseer on the Ideal Disciplinary Regime, c. 1840s
203(5)
A Slave Man Resists, 1845
208(3)
A Slave Woman Resists, 1861
211(3)
The Last Will and Testament of Patty Cooke, a Virginia Slave, 1821
214(1)
Samuel Elliot, an Ex-Slave, Claims Property Lost in the Civil War, 1873
215(30)
Essays
The Riddle of Property Rights in Human Beings
218(6)
Orlando Patterson
The Legal Basis for Mastery
224(10)
Eugene D. Genovese
Slave Property as Property Owners
234(10)
Philip D. Morgan
Further Reading
244(1)
The Roots of Resistance: Slave Cultures and Communities
245(49)
Documents
Margaret Ganner, a Slave Mother, Kills Her Child to Prevent Reenslavement, 1856
246(3)
Description of Two Women Outlaws, c. 1850s
249(1)
Descriptions of Love and Courtship in Slavery
250(2)
Letters Showing Relations Between Slave Husbands and Wives, 1840--1863
252(3)
Martin Lee and Hawkins Wilson, Two Ex-Slaves, Seek to Reunite with Their Children After Emancipation, 1866, 1867
255(3)
Spotswood Rice, an Ex-Slave Soldier, Seeks to Protect His Children, 1864
258(1)
Three Folktales Show How to Cope with Powerlessness, 1860s
259(3)
Two Slave Spirituals Express Values and Hopes
262(32)
Essays
Slave Communities Are Grounded in Family and Kinship
264(4)
Ira Berlin
Leslie S. Rowland
Gender Roles and Gender Identity in Slave Communities
268(9)
Deborah Gray White
The Slaves' World-View Revealed in Their Stories
277(15)
Lawrence W. Levine
Further Reading
292(2)
Free Blacks Confront the ``Slave Power'': The Meaning of Freedom in a Slave Society
294(40)
Documents
Henry Highland Garnet Urges Slaves to Resist, August 1843
295(3)
Frederick Douglass Opposes Free Black Emigration, September 1851
298(2)
Rosetta Douglass Describes Her Father and Mother at Home, 1851--1853
300(1)
Charlotte Forten Protests the Trial of a Fugitive Slave, 1854
301(3)
Frederick Douglass Urges Resistance to Oppression, 1857
304(1)
Oberlin Graduate Rev. Richard Winsor Describes the Rescue of a Fugitive Slave, 1858
305(29)
Essays
The Roots of Resistance in Free Black Communities
308(13)
Emma Jones Lapansky
Manhood and Womanhood in a Slave Society
321(11)
James Oliver Horton
Lois E. Horton
Further Reading
332(2)
Civil War and Emancipation
334(34)
Documents
Captain C. B. Wilder, a Civil War Relief Worker, Describes Flight from Slavery, 1863
335(1)
Corporal Octave Johnson, a Union Soldier, Describes His Escape from Slavery During the War, 1864
336(1)
John C. P. Wederstrandt and I. N. Steele, Two Slaveholders, Lose Control of Their Slave Labor, 1862, 1865
337(2)
Private Hubbard Pryor as a Slave and as a Union Soldier, c. 1864
339(1)
Slave Fugitives Tell Their Stories to Charlotte Forten, 1863
340(1)
Charlotte Forten Describes the Celebration of Emancipation in the Heart of the Confederacy, January 1, 1863
340(2)
A Freedom Song from the Civil War Era
342(26)
Essays
Soldiers of God's Wrath
343(13)
Vincent Harding
The Slaves Strike for Freedom
356(11)
Clarence L. Mohr
Further Reading
367(1)
The Work of Reconstruction
368(49)
Documents
African Americans in Richmond, Virginia, Petition President Andrew Johnson, 1865
370(2)
Freedmen of Edisto Island, South Carolina, Demand Land, 1865
372(1)
Captain Charles Soule, Northern Army Officer, Lectures Ex-Slaves on the Responsibilities of Freedom, 1865
373(2)
A Share-Wages Contract, 1865
375(1)
Charles Raushenberg, a Freedmen's Bureau Agent, Reports from Georgia, 1867
376(3)
Elizabeth Botume, a Northern Schoolteacher, Remembers a Husband and Wife Reunion, c. 1865
379(2)
Dave Waldrop, a Florida Freedman, Seeks to Reunite His Family, 1867
381(1)
Harriet Hernandes, a South Carolina Woman, Testifies Against the Ku Klux Klan, 1871
381(5)
Elected Representatives, 1872
386(31)
Essays
Schools for Freedom
388(13)
Herbert G. Gutman
Defining Free Labor
401(6)
Julie Saville
The Labor of Politics
407(10)
Elsa Barkley Brown
Further Reading
417


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