9781590173329

The Man Who Lost His Head

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781590173329

  • ISBN10:

    1590173325

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2009-11-10
  • Publisher: NYR Children's Collection
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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Out of print for more than 25 years, this classic parable by Bishop and McCloskey is back. When a man discovers he has lost his head, he tries several substitutions, including a pumpkin, a parsnip, and a piece of wood. Illustrations.

Author Biography

Claire Huchet Bishop (ca. 1899–1993) was a librarian, storyteller, critic, and writer. She grew up in Le Havre, France, and attended the Sorbonne for a time before founding France’s first library for children, L’Heure Joyeuse. Her children’s books grew out of the popular stories she told both at L’Heure Joyeuse and at the New York Public Library, where she worked after marrying the pianist Frank Bishop and settling in the United States. Among the seventeen works of fiction she wrote for children are The Five Chinese Brothers (1938), Twenty and Ten (1952), and the Newbery Honor books Pancakes-Paris (1947) and All Alone (1953). Bishop also wrote several biographies for children and nonfiction works for adults, and served as children’s book editor at Commonweal during the 1930s. Active during the Second World War in the cause of European Jews, she devoted herself after the war to fostering better understanding between Jews and Christians, writing How Catholics Look at Jews (1974) and encouraging the Vatican’s recognition of the State of Israel.

Robert McCloskey (1914–2003) was born in Ohio and moved east to study art in Boston and New York. He was awarded a prestigious Rome Prize, but World War II made it impossible for him to go to Rome. Renowned as a draftsman, McCloskey provided illustrations for a variety of authors and also wrote and illustrated eight books of his own, including Blueberries for Sal (1948), One Morning in Maine (1952), and the Caldecott Award–winning stories Make Way for Ducklings (1941) and Time of Wonder (1958). McCloskey’s last book, Burt Dow: Deep-Water Man, came out in 1963. In 2003, he died on the Maine island where he had lived with his family since the 1940s.

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