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Management of Child Development Centers,9780131712072
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Management of Child Development Centers

by ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780131712072

ISBN10:
0131712071
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div

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Summary

Management of Child Development Centers is the core text that students of child development center administration need to help them learn to manage effectively in the twenty-first century. It is the only text structured around the thirteen competencies that capable, confident child development center directors must possess. This practical text by Professor Patricia F. Hearron, a former child development center manager, and well-known author and Professor Emerita Verna Hildebrand, focuses on targeted problem-solving strategies, decision making, and specific tools. A classic in the field since 1984, the sixth edition of Management of Child Development Centers has been updated and expanded to emphasize strategies and solutions to the challenges facing todayrs"s child development center managers. More of what prospective and practicing administrators need to knowhellip; More self-evaluation and reflection instruments New practical strategies to reduce stress and burnout More specific methods to improve overall effectiveness More information about revised NAEYC accreditation standards More information about the revised Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (ECERS-R) and the revised Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale (ITERS-R) More information specific to infants and toddlers More detailed guidelines for recognizing and reporting child abuse and neglect More specific information to help with fund-raising More Internet resources

Table of Contents

PART I INTRODUCTION
1(58)
Managing Children's Centers in the 21st Century
2(17)
Defining Terms
2(1)
Stages of Professional Development
3(1)
Child Development Centers: A Support System for Families
4(1)
Population Trends: Getting the Big Picture in Focus
5(3)
Numbers and Characteristics of Children
Demand for Child Care
8(3)
Kindergartens
Early Childhood Programs in Public Schools
Head Start
Infants and Toddlers
Child Care and Poverty
11(1)
No Child Left Behind
11(1)
Core Competencies for Directors
12(4)
Conclusion
16(3)
Types of Child Development Programs
19(19)
Five Types of Child Development Programs
19(7)
Type 1: Investment in Human Capital
Type 2: A Supplement to Care and Education Provided by Families
Type 3: A Remedial or Compensatory Service
Type 4: Research and Teacher Preparation
Type 5: A Consumer Service
Three Ways of Financing Child Development Programs
26(8)
Family Payments for Child Care
Sponsored Programs
Government Support for Child Care
34(1)
Institutional Collaboration
35(1)
Conclusion
36(2)
Applying Theories in Managing a Child Development Center
38(21)
Theories from Multiple Areas of Knowledge
38(1)
Developmental Theory
39(1)
Types of Theories of Human Development
40(1)
Postmodern Critiques of Child Development Theory
40(6)
Examples of Developmental Theories
The Challenge of Applying Theories of Development
How Managers Apply Theories of Development
Management Theory
46(2)
Historical Evolution of Organization Theory
Theoretical Paradigms
Applying Management Theories
48(1)
Total Quality Management
48(1)
Ecological System Framework
49(3)
The Physical-Biological Environment
The Human-Built Environment
The Social-Cultural Environment
Equilibrium and Energy in the Ecosystem
52(1)
Applying the Ecosystems Model
53(1)
Management Processes
53(3)
Planning
Organizing
Staffing
Leading
Monitoring and Controlling for Quality
Conclusion
56(3)
PART II CORE COMPETENCIES
59(290)
Reflective Management: Personal and Professional Self-Awareness
60(16)
Reflective Practice
60(1)
Knowing Yourself
61(1)
What Will Be Your Management Style?
62(1)
Power and Conflict
Stress
Psychological Type
63(1)
Leadership Styles
64(1)
Emotional Intelligence
65(1)
Self-Awareness
Self-management
Social Awareness
Relationship Management
Stages of Personal and Professional Development
66(2)
Novice Phase
Initial Phase
Informed Phase
Complex Phase
Influential Phase
Decision Making
68(5)
Decision Types
Interrelated Decisions
The Decision Process
Rationality in Decision Making
Ethical Decisions
Time Management
73(1)
Prioritizing Tasks
Managing Meetings
Conclusion
74(2)
Organizational Management
76(21)
Working with the Systems
76(2)
Licensing
Other Governmental Regulations
Rights of Children and Families
78(1)
IDEA
TANF
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act
Business Concerns
79(1)
Tax-Exempt Status
Insurance
The Manager's Job: A Juggling Act
80(1)
Competency Areas and Management Processes
The Planning Process
81(2)
Strategic Plan and Central Concept
Tactical Operational Plans
Goals and Objectives
The Policy Board
83(1)
Bylaws
The Advisory Board
84(3)
The Value of Planning
87(1)
Time for Planning
Steps in the Planning Process
88(3)
Step 1. Define the Central Concept of Your Child Development Center
Step 2. Establish the Goals That Your Center Will Pursue
Step 3. Develop Planning Assumptions and Forecasts
Step 4. Evaluate Resources
Step 5. Develop Alternatives
Step 6. Test Alternatives Against the Resources, Goals, and Central Concepts of Your Center
Step 7. Decide on a Plan
Step 8. Implement the Plan
Step 9. Evaluate the Plan
Planning in Response to Change
91(3)
Types of Planning
Time, Scope, and Cycling of Plans
Policies, Procedures, and Rules
94(1)
Conclusion
95(2)
Fiscal Management
97(26)
Types of Resources
97(3)
MESH Formula
Funding Sources
100(1)
Parent Fees
Government Subsidies
Foregone Wages
Setting Fees
101(1)
Fees and Quality
How Funds Are Spent
102(3)
Calculating Staff Costs
Importance of Increasing Teacher Salaries
Strategies for Increasing Teacher Salaries
Fund-Raising
105(1)
In-Kind Donations
Grant Proposals
106(2)
Budget Planning
108(1)
Establishing Priorities
Types of Budgets
Flexibility
Constructing a Budget
109(3)
Income
Importance of Accurate Projections
Expenses
Balancing Act
Starting a New Business
112(3)
Help Is Available
Business Plan
Loans
Control of Funds and Expenses
Record Keeping
115(1)
Cash-Flow Analysis
116(1)
Technology and Financial Management
117(1)
Internal Controls
118(2)
Inventory Records
Avoiding Waste
Comparison Shopping
Consider Hidden Costs
Quantity Buying
Cycle Menus
Cooperative Purchases
Money-Saving Tips
Conclusion
120(3)
Personnel Management
123(28)
Organizing
123(1)
Job Design
124(7)
Job Analysis
Job Description
Job Specification
Job Classification
Job Coordination
131(2)
Authority and Responsibility
Span of Control
Organizing Classrooms or Groups
133(2)
Age Ranges
Organizational Structure
135(3)
Supervisory Staff
Volunteers
Organizing Support Services
Staffing
138(1)
Staffing Decisions
138(11)
Organizing the Search
Educational Preparation of Teachers
Level of Experience
Legal Aspects of Staffing
Staffing Procedures
Conclusion
149(2)
Human Relations
151(23)
The Importance of Human Relations
151(2)
Coping with a Staffing Shortage
The Manager's Role
153(2)
Understanding Staff Members' Needs and Desires
Employee Motivation
155(5)
Communication
Active Listening
Conflict Resolution Techniques
Fostering Teamwork and Collaboration
Staff Meetings
160(1)
Paid Staff Meetings
Full-Staff versus Team Meetings
Agenda
Minutes
Group Dynamics
161(1)
The Staff's Professional Development
162(2)
Stages of Professional Development
The Early Childhood Career Lattice
Supporting Professional Development at All Stages
164(3)
Professional Development Activities
Resources for Planning for Professional Development
The Manager's Relationships with Individual Staff Members
167(4)
Mentoring
Performance Appraisal System
Dismissing Staff Members
Volunteers
171(1)
Conclusion
172(2)
Facilities Management
174(24)
Managing Space: An Ecosystems Perspective
174(1)
Regulations and Professional Standards
175(4)
Children's Basic Environmental Needs
Density
Organizing Space
179(8)
Building Layout
Room Layout
Organizing Space
Children's Basic Environmental Needs
Space Arranged for Ease of Supervision
Space Organized to Meet Special Needs
Outdoor Play Areas
187(2)
Safety
Developmental Needs
The Outdoor Landscape
Equipment
Maintaining the Facility
189(1)
Space for Staff
189(1)
Furnishing Space
190(1)
Room Arrangement
191(5)
Learning Areas
Nap Facilities
Isolation Space
Parents' Area
Classroom
Conclusion
196(2)
Managing Health and Safety Issues
198(24)
Planning for a Healthy Environment
198(1)
Licensing Regulations and Professional Standards
199(2)
Policies and Practices
Risk Management
201(8)
Safe Arrival and Departure
Transporting Children
Child Abuse
Emergency Procedures
Employees' Health
209(1)
Meeting Ongoing Health Needs
209(1)
Meeting Children's Physiological Needs
209(4)
Activity and Rest
Diapering Infants
Toilet Training
Parental Responsibility for Children's Health
213(1)
When Children Become Ill
213(2)
Readmission After Illness
Children with Disabilities and Chronic Medical Problems
215(2)
Prescription Medications
Health Education for Children and Their Families
217(1)
Meeting Children's Mental Health Needs
217(1)
Helping Children Cope with Catastrophic Events
Monitoring Health and Safety Conditions
218(1)
Conclusion
218(4)
Managing Food Service
222(23)
Planning Meal Service
222(1)
Meeting Regulations and Professional Standards
223(1)
Federal Subsidies for Food Programs
223(1)
Organizing Food Service Facilities
224(1)
Food Service Personnel
224(1)
Food Poisoning Prevention
225(1)
Considerations When Feeding Babies
226(3)
Menu Planning
229(5)
Snacks
Special Diets
Seating and Serving Children
234(2)
Influencing Children's Eating Behaviors
Food and Curriculum
236(3)
Collaborating with Families About Food Matters
239(1)
Culture and Food
Monitoring and Controlling Food Programs
240(2)
Conclusion
242(3)
Educational Programming
245(25)
Preliminary Organization
245(1)
Regulations and Professional Standards
246(3)
Licensing
Accreditation
Tiered or Rated Licensing
State Early Learning Standards
Selecting a Curriculum Model or Approach
249(4)
Developmental Principles
253(1)
Basic Guides to Program Development
254(2)
Manager's Responsibility for the Educational Program
256(4)
Scheduling
260(2)
Scheduling for Infants and Toddlers
Families' Role in the Educational Program
262(3)
Planning Experiences for Children
265(3)
Conclusion
268(2)
Family Support
270(24)
Relationships with Families
270(1)
Regulations and Professional Standards
271(2)
NAEYC Guidelines
DEC Guidelines
Understanding Family Systems
273(2)
Parenting Styles
Cultural Responsiveness
275(2)
Interpersonal Aspects of Cultural Responsiveness
Structural Aspects of Cultural Responsiveness
Family-Friendly Practice
277(1)
Building Partnerships with Families
278(10)
Pre-Enrollment Visits
Handbook for Families
Orientation
Phased Enrollment
Home Visits
Families Visit the Center
Conferences
Parent Meetings
Newsletters, E-Mail, and Web Pages
Documentation and Display
Family Resource Corner
Home Activities
When Conflicts Arise
288(2)
Families as Human Resources for the Center
290(1)
Community Resources to Promote Family Wellness
291(1)
Conclusion
291(3)
Marketing and Public Relations
294(20)
Marketing: Attracting and Retaining Customers
295(7)
Communicating Your Message
Identifying and Reaching Potential Customers
Making the Most of First Contacts
Service Environment as Marketing Tool
Increasing Customer Satisfaction
302(1)
Principles of Customer Service
Public Relations: Impacting Perceptions and Opinions
303(6)
Family Members as PR Representatives
Expanding the Audience
Agency Links
Publicizing Events and Accomplishments
Accreditation
Staff Development as a Public Relations Vehicle
Networking
The World Beyond Child Care
309(1)
Making Connections
``Double Duty'' in Public Relations
310(1)
Countering Negative Publicity
310(1)
Conclusion
311(3)
Assessment and Evaluation
314(17)
Standards
315(1)
Accreditation
316(1)
The Manager's Role
316(1)
Steps in the Managing and Controlling Process
317(1)
Evaluation of the Educational Program
318(7)
Children Evaluate
Teachers Evaluate
Families Evaluate
The Community and Professionals Evaluate
The Manager Evaluates
Monitoring Other Units
325(2)
The Financial Area
The Physical Plant
Food Service
Children's Health and Safety
Parental and Public Relations
Evaluation of Management
327(2)
Evaluating Administrative Practice
When Evaluations Yield Negative Results
329(1)
Conclusion
329(2)
Leadership
331(18)
Managing and Leading Differ
332(1)
Types of Leadership
332(12)
Pedagogical Leadership
Administrative Leadership
Advocacy Leadership
Community Leadership
Conceptual Leadership
Values
Leadership and Accreditation
344(1)
Professional Support
344(1)
Professional Research and Writing
344(1)
Consulting
344(1)
Conclusion
345(4)
Appendix Resources for Professional Support 349(4)
References 353(10)
Name Index 363(3)
Subject Index 366


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