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Management Communication,9780131016446
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Management Communication

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780131016446

ISBN10:
013101644X
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

For undergraduate courses in Advanced Business Communication, Organizational Communication, or Managerial Communication, and for first-year graduate courses in Management Communication. This book takes a strategic approach to management thought and action, focusing on communication in transition, communication ethics, listening and feedback, communicating nonverbally, communicating in intercultural and international contexts, managing conflict, business meetings, and dealings with the media.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
CHAPTER 1 Management Communication in Transition 1(21)
What Do Managers Do All Day?
2(1)
The Roles Managers Play
3(2)
Major Characteristics of the Manager's Job
5(1)
What Varies in a Manager's Job? The Emphasis
6(1)
Talk Is the Work
7(1)
Management Skills Required for the Twenty-First Century
7(1)
The Major Channels of Management Communication Are Talking and Listening
8(1)
The Role of Writing
9(1)
Information Is Socially Constructed
10(1)
Communication Is Invention
10(1)
Your Task as a Professional
11(1)
Your Greatest Challenge
11(1)
Endnotes
12(1)
For Further Reading
13(1)
CASE 1-1 Odwalla, Inc. (A)
14(6)
CASE 1-2 F.W. Woolworth Company
20(2)
CHAPTER 2 Communication and Strategy 22 (26)
Defining Communication
22(1)
Elements of Communication
23(1)
Levels of Communication
24(1)
Principles of Communication
24(1)
Communicating Strategically
25(1)
Barriers to Communication
25(2)
Successful Strategic Communication
27(1)
Why Communicating as a Manager Is Different
28(2)
For Further Reading
30(1)
The Tactics of Communication
30(1)
CASE 2-1 Great West Casualty v. Estate of G. Witherspoon (A)
31(3)
CASE 2-2 Great Lakes Garments, Inc.
34(2)
CASE 2-3 Augusta National Golf Club
36(12)
CHAPTER 3 Communication Ethics 46 The Ethical Conduct of Employers 48(34)
Three Levels of Inquiry
49(1)
Defining Business Ethics
49(1)
Three Views of Decision Making
50(1)
An Integrated Approach
51(1)
The Nature of Moral Judgments
52(1)
Four Resources for Decision Making
53(1)
Distinguishing Characteristics of Moral Principles
53(2)
Making Moral Judgments
55(2)
Statements of Ethical Principles
57(1)
Applying Ethical Standards to Management Communication
57(3)
The "Front Page" Test
60(1)
Endnotes
61(1)
For Further Reading
62(1)
CASE 3-1 Excel Industries (A)
63(4)
CASE 3-2 A Collection Scandal at Sears Roebuck & Company
67(3)
CASE 3-3 The Soul of Dell: The Value of Corporate Philosophy Statements
70(5)
CASE 3-4 Arthur Andersen, LLP: An Accounting Firm in Crisis
75(7)
CHAPTER 4 Speaking 82(27)
Why Speak?
83(1)
Get to Know Your Audience
84(1)
Develop a Strategy
84(1)
How to Prepare a Successful Management Speech
84(2)
Determine Your Reason for Speaking
86(1)
What Makes People Listen?
87(1)
Learn What You Can About the Occasion
87(1)
Understand the Questions Listeners Bring to Any Listening Situation
88(1)
Recognize Common Obstacles to Successful Communication
89(2)
Support Your Ideas with Credible Evidence
91(1)
Organize Your Thoughts
92(2)
Any Advice Beyond Structure?
94(1)
Keep Your Audience Interested
95(2)
Select a Delivery Approach
97(1)
Giving an Impromptu Talk
98(1)
Develop Your Visual Support
99(1)
Rehearse Your Speech
100(1)
Deliver Your Message
101(1)
Develop Confidence in Your Message and Yourself
101(2)
Endnotes
103(1)
For Further Reading
104(1)
CASE 4-1 A Last Minute Change at Old Dominion Trust
105(1)
CASE 4-2 Preparing to Speak at Staples, Inc.
106 (3)
CHAPTER 5 Writing 109(35)
Fifteen Ways to Become a Better Business Writer
111(1)
An Introduction to Good Business Writing
111(1)
Writing a Business Memo
112(1)
Writing an Overview Paragraph
113(1)
The Six Communication Strategies
113(1)
Sample Overviews
114(1)
The Informative Memo
115(1)
The Persuasive Memo
116(1)
Standard Formats for Memos
117(1)
Project Lists
118(1)
Meeting and Conference Reports
118(1)
Make Your Memos Inviting and Attractive
119(1)
Editing Your Memos
119(1)
Writing Good Business Letters
120(1)
When You Are Required to Explain Something
121(1)
When You Are Required to Apologize
122(1)
Make Your Writing Efficient
123(1)
A Few Words About Style
123(2)
Speak When You Write
125(1)
How to Make Passive Verbs Active
126(1)
Make Your Bottom Line Your Top Line
127(1)
How to Encourage and Develop Good Writers
128(3)
Endnotes
131(1)
For Further Reading
131(1)
CASE 5-1 Cypress Semiconductor Corporation
132(8)
CASE 5-2 Farberware Products of America
140(1)
CASE 5-3 Volvo of North America, Inc.
141(3)
CHAPTER 6 Technology 144 (35)
Communicating Digitally
145 (1)
Life in the Digital Age
145 (1)
Electronic Mail
146 (4)
Privacy and Workplace Monitoring
150(6)
The Internet and Online Behavior
156(2)
Etiquette and Office Electronics
158(2)
Working Virtually
160 (2)
Teleconferencing
162 (4)
Technology on the Horizon
166 (1)
Endnotes
167(3)
For Further Reading
170(1)
CASE 6-1 Cerner Corporation
171(5)
CASE 6-2 Vitruvius Sportswear, Inc.
176(3)
CHAPTER 7 Listening and Feedback 179 (32)
The Benefits of Better Listening
180 (1)
Why Listen?
180 (2)
An Inventory of Poor Listening Habits
182(1)
The Role of Ineffective Listening Habits
182(3)
Developing Good Listening Habits
185 (1)
The Five Essential Skills of Active Listening
186(1)
A System for Improving Your Listening Habits
187(1)
Guidelines for Constructive Feedback
188 (1)
Giving and Receiving Feedback
188(2)
Knowing When Not to Give Feedback
190(1)
Knowing How to Give Effective Feedback
191(1)
Knowing How to Receive Feedback
192(2)
Endnotes
194 (1)
For Further Reading
194 (2)
CASE 7-1A Earl's Family Restaurants
196(2)
CASE 7-1B Earl's Family Restaurants
198(2)
CASE 7-1C Earl's Family Restaurants
200(3)
CASE 7-2A The Kroger Company
203 (3)
CASE 7-2B The Kroger Company
206 (1)
CASE 7-2C The Kroger Company
207 (2)
CASE 7-3 Three Feedback Exercises
209(2)
CHAPTER 8 Communicating Nonverbally 211(25)
Nonverbal Categories
212 (1)
A Few Basic Considerations
212 (1)
Reading and Misreading Nonverbal Cues
213(1)
The Nonverbal Process
213(1)
Functions of Nonverbal Communication
214(1)
Principles of Nonverbal Communication
215(1)
Dimensions of the Nonverbal Code
216(12)
Endnotes
228(2)
For Further Reading
230(1)
CASE 8-1 Olive Garden Restaurants Division
231(3)
CASE 8-2 Waukegan Materials, Inc.
234(2)
CHAPTER 9 Communicating in Intercultural and International Contexts 236(17)
Intercultural Challenges at Home
236(2)
Cultural Challenges Abroad
238(2)
Business and Culture
240 (1)
Some Principles of Culture
241(1)
Definitions of Culture
241 (4)
Cross-Cultural Communication Skills
245(1)
Ethnocentrism
245(1)
Functions of Culture
245(1)
Endnotes
246(1)
For Further Reading
247(1)
CASE 9-1 Oak Brook Medical Systems, Inc.
248(2)
CASE 9-2 Big Dog Software, Inc.
250(3)
CHAPTER 10 Managing Conflict 253(30)
A Definition of Conflict
254(1)
Sources of Conflict in Organizations
255(1)
Conflict in Organizations
255(1)
Sensing Conflict
256(2)
The Benefits of Dealing with Conflict
258(1)
Styles of Conflict Management
259(1)
So, What Should You Do?
260(2)
What If You're the Problem?
262(2)
Endnotes
264(1)
For Further Reading
265(1)
CASE 10-1 Hayward Healthcare Systems, Inc.
266(2)
CASE 10-2 Dixie Industries, Inc.
268(5)
CASE 10-3 Hershey Foods
273(7)
Appendix A Timeline
280(2)
Appendix B Impact on Hershey Stock
282(1)
CHAPTER 11 Business Meetings That Work 283(22)
So, Why Meet?
284(1)
What's the Motivation for Meeting?
284(1)
When Should I Call a Meeting?
285(1)
What Is a Business Meeting?
285(1)
What Should I Consider as I Plan for a Meeting?
286(1)
When Should I Not Call a Meeting?
286(1)
The Agenda
287(1)
How Do I Prepare for a Successful Meeting?
288(1)
The Participants
288(2)
What Form or Meeting Style Will Work Best?
290(1)
How Do I Keep a Meeting on Track?
291(1)
What Should I Look For?
292(1)
What Should I Listen For?
292(1)
What Should I Write Down?
293(1)
How Can I Make My Meetings More Productive?
294(2)
Can Business Meetings Ever Improve?
296(1)
Endnotes
296(1)
For Further Reading
297(1)
CASE 11-1 Sequoia Medical Supply, Inc.
298(4)
CASE 11-2 Spartan Industries, Inc.
302(3)
CHAPTER 12 Dealing with the News Media 305 (38)
Introduction
305(1)
Overview
306(1)
Why Interviews Are Important
307(3)
Should You or Shouldn't You?
310(3)
A Look at the News Media
313(4)
Getting Ready
317(3)
Making It Happen
320(1)
Staying in Control of an Interview
321(2)
Follow-Up
323(1)
Endnotes
324(1)
For Further Reading
324(1)
CASE 12-1 American Rubber Products Company, Inc.
325(3)
CASE 12-2 Bayer AG: Anthrax and Cipro
328(7)
Appendix A Timeline of Case-Related Events
335(2)
Appendix B Anthrax Visual
337(1)
Appendix C Timeline of Patent-Related Events
338(1)
Exercise 12-1 Buon Giorno Italian Foods, Inc.
339(1)
Exercise 12-2 O'Brien Paint Company
340(3)
Appendix A Analyzing a Case Study 343(7)
Appendix B Writing a Case Study 350(7)
Appendix C Sample Business Letter 357(2)
Appendix D Sample Business Memo 359(2)
Appendix E Sample Strategy Memo 361(2)
Appendix F Documentation 363 (9)
Appendix G Media Relations for Business Professionals 372(6)
Appendix H News Release 378 (2)
Index 380

Excerpts

Many years ago, as an Air Force officer assigned to a flight test group in the American Southwest, I had the opportunity to speak with an older (and obviously wiser) man who had been in the flying business for many years. Our conversation focused on what it would take for a young officer to succeed--to become a leader, a recognized influence among talented, trained, and well-educated peers. His words were prophetic: "I can think of no skill more essential to the survival of a young officer," he said, "than effective self-expression." That was it. Not physical courage or well-honed flying skills. Not advanced degrees or specialized training, but "effective self-expression." In the years since that conversation, I have personally been witness to what young managers call "career moments." Those are moments in time when a carefully crafted proposal, a thorough report, or a deft response to criticism have saved a career. I've seen young men and women offered a job as a result of an especially skillful speech introduction. I've seen others sputter and stall when they couldn't answer a direct question--one that fell well within their area of expertise--during a briefing. I've watched in horror as others simply talked their way into disfavor, trouble, or oblivion. Communication is, without question, the central skill any manager can possess. It is the link between ideas and action. It is the process that generates profit. It is the emotional glue that binds humans together in relationships, personal and professional. It is, as the poet William Blake put it, "the chariot of genius." To be without the ability to communicate is to be isolated from others in an organization, an industry, or a society. To be skilled at it is to be at the heart of what makes enterprise, private and public, function successfully. The fundamental premise on which this book is based is simple: Communication is a skill that can be learned, taught, and improved. You have the potential to be better at communicating with other people than you now are. It won't be easy, but this book can certainly help. The very fact that you've gotten this far is evidence that you're determined to succeed, and what follows is a systematic yet readable review of those things you'll need to pay closer attention to in order to experience success as a manager. WHAT THIS BOOK IS ABOUT This book will focus on the processes involved in management communication and concentrate on ways in which business students and entry-level managers can become more effective by becoming more knowledgeable and skilled as communicators. The second premise on which this book is based is also simple: Writing, speaking, listening, and other communication behaviors are the end-products of a process that begins with critical thinking. It is this process that managers are called on to employ every day in the workplace to earn a living. The basic task of a manager, day in and day out, is to solve managerial problems. The basic tools at a manager's disposal are mostly rhetorical. Management Communicationsupports learning objectives that are strategic in nature, evolving as the workplace changes to meet the demands of a global economy that is changing at a ferocious pace. What you will find in these pages assumes certain basic competencies in communication, but encourages growth and development as you encounter the responsibilities and opportunities of midlevel and higher management, whether in your own business or in large and complex, publicly traded organizations. WHAT'S DIFFERENT ABOUT THIS BOOK This book is aimed directly at the way most professors of management communication teach, yet in a number of important ways is different from other books in this field. First, the process is entirely strategic. We begin with the somewhat nontraditional view that all communication processes in successful businesses in this


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