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Managerial Accounting, 3rd Edition,9780470038154
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Managerial Accounting, 3rd Edition

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780470038154

ISBN10:
0470038152
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
10/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Wiley
List Price: $261.30
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Summary

Recognizing that most students will pursue careers as managers not accountants, Managerial Accounting omits topics of less importance and concentrates on the key accounting concepts that managers need to understand in order to make successful, informed decisions. Managerial Accounting focuses attention on decision making through incremental analysis and performance measurement. Students are motivated to learn managerial accounting by connecting concepts and techniques to the real world; using real cases and real manager's comments on real company issues. Students and instructors alike have praised this text's clear and concise writing style, to-the-point discussions, illustrated ideas, and examples that are presented to make ideas concrete

Author Biography

PROFESSOR JAMES JIAMBALVO joined the accounting faculty at the University of Washington after receiving a Ph.D. in accounting from The Ohio State University. A CPA, he has audit experience with the firm of Haskins and Sells (now Deloitte & Touche), and has served on the national academic advisory board of Deloitte & Touche LLP. Professor Jiambalvo has served as chairman of the UW Accounting Department and he holds the PricewaterhouseCoopers and Alumni Endowed Professorship.

Table of Contents

Managerial Accounting in the Information Age
3(34)
Goal of Managerial Accounting
4(1)
Planning
4(1)
Budgets for Planning
4(1)
Control
4(3)
Performance Reports for Control
5(2)
Decision Making
7(1)
A Comparison of Managerial and Financial Accounting
7(1)
Internal versus External Users
8(1)
Need to Use GAAP
8(1)
Detail of Information
8(1)
Emphasis on Nonmonetary Information
8(1)
Emphasis on the Future
8(1)
Similarities between Financial and Managerial Accounting
8(1)
Cost Terms Used in Discussing Planning, Control, and Decision Making
9(1)
Variable and Fixed Costs
9(1)
Variable Costs
9(1)
Fixed Costs
10(1)
Sunk Costs
10(1)
Opportunity Costs
10(1)
Direct and Indirect Costs
10(1)
Controllable and Noncontrollable Costs
11(1)
Two Key Ideas in Managerial Accounting
11(1)
Decision Making Relies on Incremental Analysis
12(1)
You Get What You Measure!
13(1)
The Information Age and Managerial Accounting
14(1)
Competition and Information Technology
14(1)
The Impact of Information Technology on Management of the Value Chain
14(2)
Information Flows between Milano and Customers
15(1)
Information Flows between Milano and Suppliers
15(1)
Using Information Technology to Gain Internal Efficiencies
15(1)
Software Systems That Impact Value Chain Management
16(1)
Enterprise Resource Planning Systems
16(1)
Supply Chain Management Systems
16(1)
Customer Relationship Management Systems
16(1)
Ethical Considerations in Managerial Decision Making
17(1)
Ethical and Unethical Behavior
17(2)
Sarbanes-Oxley Act
18(1)
A Framework for Ethical Decision Making
19(1)
IMA Statement of Ethical Professional Practice
20(1)
The Controller as the Top Management Accountant
20(2)
Making Business Decisions
22(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
23(1)
Appendix IMA Statement of Ethical Professional Practice
24(1)
Principles
24(1)
Standards
24(1)
Resolution of Ethical Conflict
25(1)
Key Terms
25(1)
Self-Assessment
26(1)
Interactive Learning
27(1)
Questions
27(1)
Exercises
27(3)
Problems
30(4)
Cases
34(3)
Job-Order Costing for Manufacturing and Service Companies
37(50)
Cost Classifications for Manufacturing Firms
38(1)
Manufacturing Costs
39(1)
Direct Material
39(1)
Direct Labor
40(1)
Manufacturing Overhead
40(1)
Nonmanufacturing Costs
40(1)
Selling Costs
40(1)
General and Administrative Costs
41(1)
Product and Period Costs
41(1)
Product Costs
41(1)
Period Costs
41(1)
Product Cost Information in Financial Reporting and Decision Making
42(1)
Balance Sheet Presentation of Product Costs
43(1)
Flow of Product Costs in Accounts
44(1)
Income Statement Presentation of Product Costs
45(2)
Cost of Goods Manufactured
45(1)
Cost of Goods Sold
46(1)
Types of Costing Systems
47(1)
Overview of Job Costs and Financial Statement Accounts
48(1)
Job-Order Costing System
49(1)
Direct Material Cost
50(2)
Direct Labor Cost
52(1)
Manufacturing Overhead
53(1)
Assigning Costs to Jobs: A Summary
54(1)
Eastlike Revisited: Using Job Cost Information
55(2)
Relation Between the Costs of Jobs and the Flow of Costs in Work in Process, Finished Goods, and Cost of Goods Sold
57(1)
Allocating Overhead to Jobs: A Closer Look
57(1)
Overhead Allocation Rates
58(1)
The Overhead Allocation Base
58(1)
Activity-Based Costing (ABC) and Multiple Overhead Rates
59(1)
Predetermined Overhead Rates
59(1)
Eliminating Overapplied or Underapplied Overhead
60(1)
Job-Order Costing for Service Companies
61(1)
Modern Manufacturing Practices and Product Costing Systems
62(1)
Just-In-Time (JIT) Production
63(1)
Computer-Controlled Manufacturing
63(2)
Total Quality Management
65(2)
Making Business Decisions
67(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
67(1)
Review Problem
68(2)
Key Terms
70(1)
Self Assessment
71(1)
Interactive Learning
72(1)
Questions
72(1)
Exercises
72(4)
Problems
76(8)
Cases
84(3)
Process Costing
87(38)
Difference Between Job-Order and Process Costing Systems
88(2)
Product and Cost Flows
90(1)
Product Flows Through Departments
90(3)
Cost Flows Through Accounts
91(1)
Direct Material
92(1)
Direct Labor
92(1)
Manufacturing Overhead
92(1)
Transferred-in Cost
92(1)
Calculating Unit Cost
93(1)
Equivalent Units
93(1)
Cost Per Equivalent Unit
94(1)
Calculating and Applying Cost Per Equivalent Unit: Mixing Department Example
94(1)
Cost Transferred Out
95(1)
Ending Work in Process
96(1)
Production Cost Report
96(1)
Reconciliation of Units
96(2)
Reconciliation of Costs
98(1)
Basic Steps in Process Costing: A Summary
98(1)
Kent Chemical Revisited: Answering Stacy's Question
99(1)
Dealing With Transferred-In Cost: Packaging Department Example
99(2)
Process Costing and Incremental Analysis
101(2)
Making Business Decisions
103(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
103(1)
Review Problem
104(2)
Key Terms
106(1)
Self Assessment
106(1)
Interactive Learning
107(1)
Questions
107(1)
Exercises
107(4)
Problems
111(8)
Cases
119(6)
Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis
125(54)
Common Cost Behavior Patterns
126(1)
Variable Costs
126(1)
Fixed Costs
126(2)
Discretionary Versus Committed Fixed Costs
128(1)
Mixed Costs
128(1)
Step Costs
129(1)
Cost Estimation Methods
130(1)
Account Analysis
130(2)
Scattergraphs
132(2)
High-Low Method
134(2)
Regression Analysis
136(1)
The Relevant Range
137(1)
Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis
138(1)
The Profit Equation
138(1)
Break-Even Point
138(2)
Margin of Safety
139(1)
Contribution Margin
140(1)
Contribution Margin Ratio
140(1)
``What-If'' Analysis
141(1)
Change in Fixed and Variable Costs
141(1)
Change in Selling Price
141(1)
Taxes in CVP Analysis
142(1)
Multiproduct Analysis
142(1)
Contribution Margin Approach
142(1)
Contribution Margin Ratio Approach
143(3)
Assumptions in CVP Analysis
146(1)
Codeconnect Example Revisited: Answering Mary's Question
147(1)
Operating Leverage
148(1)
Constraints
149(1)
Making Business Decisions
150(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
150(5)
Review Problem
155(1)
Key Terms
156(1)
Self Assessment
157(1)
Interactive Learning
158(1)
Questions
158(1)
Exercises
158(6)
Problems
164(10)
Cases
174
Appendix Using Regression in Excel® to Estimate Fixed and Variable Costs
151(1)
Setting Up the Spreadsheet
151(1)
Interpreting the Output of the Regression Program
152(27)
The Plot
152(1)
R Square
152(2)
Intercept and Slope of the Regression Line
154(1)
P-Value
154(25)
Variable Costing
179(30)
Full (Absorption) and Variable Costing
180(1)
Variable Costing Income Statement
180(2)
Effects of Production on Income for Full Versus Variable Costing: The Clausentube Example
182(1)
Quantity Produced Equals Quantity Sold
183(2)
Quantity Produced is Greater Than Quantity Sold
185(2)
Quantity Produced is Less Than Quantity Sold
187(1)
Explaining What Happened at ClausenTube
188(1)
Impact of JIT on the Income Effects of Full versus Variable Costing
188(1)
Benefits of Variable Costing for Internal Reporting
189(1)
Variable Costing Facilitates C-V-P Analysis
189(1)
Variable Costing Limits Management of Earnings with Production Volume
189(1)
Making Business Decisions
189(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
190(1)
Review Problem
190(2)
Key Terms
192(1)
Self Assessment
192(1)
Interactive Learning
193(1)
Questions
193(1)
Exercises
194(2)
Problems
196(9)
Cases
205(4)
Cost Allocation and Activity-Based Costing
209(52)
Purposes of Cost Allocation
210(1)
To Provide Information for Decision Making
210(1)
To Reduce Frivolous Use of Common Resources
211(1)
To Encourage Evaluation of Services
212(1)
To Provide ``Full Cost'' Information
213(1)
Process of Cost Allocation
214(1)
Determining the Cost Objective
214(1)
Forming Cost Pools
214(1)
Selecting an Allocation Base
215(1)
Allocation Service Department Costs
216(1)
Direct Method of Allocating Service Department Costs
217(1)
Allocating Budgeted and Actual Service Department Costs
218(1)
Problems with Cost Allocation
218(1)
Responsibility Accounting and Controllable Costs
219(1)
Arbitrary Allocations
219(1)
Unitized Fixed Costs and Lump-Sum Allocations
220(2)
The Problem of Too Few Cost Pools
222(1)
Using Only Volume-Related Allocation Bases
223(1)
Activity-Based Costing
223(1)
The Problem of Using Only Measures of Production Volume to Allocate Overhead
223(1)
The ABC Approach
224(2)
Relating Cost Pools to Products Using Cost Drivers
226(1)
The ABC Approach at Gardenrite Manufacturing: A Comprehensive Example
226(3)
Gardenrite's Costs under the Traditional Approach
226(1)
Gardenrite's Costs under the ABC Approach
227(2)
Pros and Cons of ABC
229(2)
Benefits
229(2)
Limitations
231(1)
Activity-Based Management (ABM)
231(1)
Remember---You Get What You Measure!
232(1)
Making Business Decisions
233(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
233(1)
Appendix Activity Based Management
234(1)
Step 1: Determine Major Activities
234(1)
Step 2: Identify Resources Used by Each Activity
235(1)
Return Merchandise to Stock if Not Acceptable to Customer or Customer Not Home to Receive Delivery
235(1)
Wash Delivery Trucks
235(1)
Step 3: Evaluate the Performance of the Activities
236(1)
Step 4: Identity Ways to Improve the Efficiency and/or Effectiveness of the Activities
236(1)
Conclusion
236(1)
Review Problem
237(2)
Key Terms
239(1)
Self Assessment
239(1)
Interactive Learning
240(1)
Questions
240(1)
Exercises
240(5)
Problems
245(11)
Cases
256(5)
The Use of Cost Information in Management Decision Making
261(41)
Incremental Analysis
262(2)
When Your Boss Asks ``What Does This Product (Service) Cost?'' You Should Say ``Why Do You Want to Know?''
264(1)
Analysis of Decisions Faced by Managers
265(1)
Additional Processing Decision
265(2)
Make-or-Buy Decision: the General Refrigeration Example
267(3)
Dropping A Product Line
270(2)
Beware of the Cost Allocation Death Spiral!
272(1)
Summary of Incremental, Avoidable, Sunk, and Opportunity Costs
272(1)
Decisions Involving Joint Costs
273(1)
Allocation of Joint Costs
274(2)
Additional Processing Decisions and Joint Costs
276(1)
Qualitative Considerations in Decision Analysis
277(1)
Making Business Decisions
278(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
279(1)
Appendix The Theory of Constraints (Toc)
279(1)
The Five-Step Process of Toc
279(1)
Step 1: Identify the Binding Constraint
280(1)
Step 2: Optimize Use of the Constraint
280(1)
Step 3: Subordinate Everything Else to the Constraint
281(1)
Step 4: Break the Constraint
281(1)
Step 5: Identify a New Binding Constraint
281(1)
Implications of TOC for Inspections, Batch Sizes, and Across the Board Cuts
281(1)
Inspections
282(1)
Batch Sizes
282(1)
Across the Board Cuts
282(1)
You Get What You Measure and Toc
282(1)
Review Problem
282(1)
Key Terms
283(1)
Self Assessment
283(1)
Interactive Learning
284(1)
Questions
285(1)
Exercises
285(5)
Problems
290(8)
Cases
298(4)
Pricing Decisions, Analyzing Customer Profitability, and Activity-Based Pricing
302(27)
The Profit Maximizing Price
302(1)
Pricing Special Orders
303(1)
Cost-Plus Pricing
304(2)
Target Costing
306(2)
Analyzing Customer Profitability: Revisiting the Wholesale Office Supply Case
308(3)
Activity-Based Pricing
311(1)
Making Business Decisions
312(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
312(1)
Review Problem
313(2)
Key Terms
315(1)
Self Assessment
315(1)
Interactive Learning
316(1)
Questions
316(1)
Exercises
317(4)
Problems
321(5)
Cases
326(3)
Capital Budgeting and Other Long-Run Decisions
329(45)
Capital Budgeting Decisions
330(1)
Evaluating Investment Opportunities: Time Value of Money Approaches
331(1)
Basic Time Value of Money Calculations
332(1)
The Net Present Value Method
333(3)
Steps in the NPV Method
334(1)
An Example of the NVP Approach
334(2)
The Internal Rate of Return Method
336(1)
The Internal Rate of Return Method With Unequal Cash Flows
337(2)
Summary of Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return Methods
339(1)
Considering ``Soft'' Benefits in Investment Decisions
339(1)
Calculating the Value of Soft Benefits Required to Make an Investment Acceptable
340(1)
Estimating the Required Rate of Return
341(1)
Additional Cash Flow Considerations
342(1)
Cash Flows, Taxes, and the Depreciation Tax Shield
342(3)
Adjusting Cash Flows for Inflation
345(1)
Other Long-Run Decisions
345(2)
Simplified Approaches to Capital Budgeting
347(1)
Payback Period Method
347(1)
Accounting Rate of Return
348(2)
Conflict Between Performance Evaluation and Capital Budgeting
350(1)
Wilson Air Example Revisited
351(1)
Making Business Decisions
352(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
353(1)
Appendix A: Using Excel® to Calculate NPV and IRR
354(3)
Appendix B: Present Value Tables
357(1)
Review Problem
358(1)
Key Terms
359(1)
Self Assessment
359(1)
Interactive Learning
360(1)
Questions
361(1)
Exercises
361(2)
Problems
363(7)
Cases
370(4)
Budgetary Planning and Control
374(45)
Use of Budgets in Planning and Control
374(1)
Planning
374(1)
Control
374(2)
Developing the Budget
376(1)
Budget Time Period
377(1)
Zero-Base Budgeting
377(1)
The Master Budget
378(1)
Sales Budget
378(1)
Production Budget
379(2)
Direct Material Purchase Budget
381(1)
Direct Labor Budget
381(1)
Manufacturing Overhead Budget
382(1)
Selling and Administrative Expense Budget
382(2)
Budgeted Income Statement
384(1)
Capital Acquisitions Budget
384(1)
Cash Receipts and Disbursement Budget
385(2)
Budgeted Balance Sheet
387(1)
Use of Computers in the Budget Planning Process
388(1)
Budgetary Control
388(1)
Budgets as a Standard for Evaluation
389(1)
Static and Flexible Budgets
389(2)
Investigating Budget Variances
391(1)
Conflict in Planning and Control Uses of Budgets
392(1)
Why Budget-Based Compensation Can Lead to Budget Padding and Income Shifting
392(2)
Evaluation, Measurement, and Management Behavior
394(1)
The Preston Joystick Case Revisited
394(1)
Making Business Decisions
394(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
395(1)
Review Problem
395(2)
Key Terms
397(1)
Self Assessment
398(1)
Interactive Learning
398(1)
Questions
399(1)
Exercises
399(4)
Problems
403(12)
Cases
415(4)
Standard Costs and Variance Analysis
419(38)
Standard Costs
420(1)
Standard Costs and Budgets
420(1)
Development of Standard Costs
421(1)
Ideal Versus Attainable Standards
422(1)
A General Approach to Variance Analysis
422(1)
Material Variances
423(1)
Material Price Variance
424(1)
Material Quantity Variance
424(1)
Direct Labor Vaiances
425(1)
Labor Rate Variance
426(1)
Labor Efficiency Variance
426(1)
Overhead Variances
426(1)
Controllable Overhead Variance
427(1)
Overhead Volume Variance
427(2)
Computing the Overhead Volume Variance
428(1)
Interpreting the Overhead Volume Variance
428(1)
Calculating the Financial Impact of Operating at More or Less Than Planned Capacity
429(1)
Comprehensive Example: Darrington Ice Cream
430(2)
Material Variances
432(1)
Labor Variances
432(1)
Overhead Variances
432(1)
Investigation of Standard Cost Variances
433(1)
Management by Exception
434(1)
``Favorable'' Variances May be Unfavorable
434(1)
Can Process Improvements Lead to ``Unfavorable'' Variances?
434(1)
Beware---Evaluation in Terms of Variances Can Lead to Excess Production
435(1)
Responsibility Accounting and Variances
436(1)
Making Business Decisions
436(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
436(1)
Appendix: Recording Standard Costs in Accounts
437(1)
Recording Material Costs
437(1)
Recording Labor Cost
438(1)
Recording Manufacturing Overhead
438(1)
Recording Finished Goods
439(1)
Recording Cost of Goods Sold
439(1)
Closing Variance Accounts
440(1)
Review Problem
440(2)
Key Terms
442(1)
Self Assessment
442(1)
Interactive Learning
443(1)
Questions
443(1)
Exercises
444(4)
Problems
448(6)
Cases
454(3)
Decentralization and Performance Evaluation
457(50)
Why Firms Decentralize
458(1)
Advantages of Decentralization
458(1)
Disadvantages of Decentralization
459(1)
Why Companies Evaluate the Performance of Subunits and Subunit Managers
460(1)
Responsibility Accounting and Performance Evaluation
461(1)
Cost Centers, Profit Centers, and Investment Centers
462(1)
Cost Centers
462(1)
Profit Centers
463(1)
Investment Centers
463(1)
Evaluating Investment Centers with ROI
464(2)
Measuring Income and Invested Capital When Calculating ROI
466(1)
Problems With Using ROI
467(1)
Problems of Overinvestment and Underinvestment: You Get What You Measure!
468(2)
Evaluation in Terms of Profit Can Lead to Overinvestment
469(1)
Evaluation in Terms of ROI Can Lead to Underinvestment
469(1)
Evaluation Using Economic Value Added (EVA)
470(1)
Residual Income (RI)
470(1)
Revisiting the Situation at Action Industries
471(1)
Solving the Overinvestment and Underinvestment Problems
471(1)
Economic Value Added (EVA)
471(5)
EVA Example
472(4)
Using a Balanced Scorecard to Evaluate Performance
476(1)
Tying the Balanced Scorecard Measures to the Strategy for Success
476(2)
Scenario 1. Learning and Growth Dimension
477(1)
Scenario 2. Internal Process Dimension
477(1)
Scenario 3. Customer Dimension
477(1)
Scenario 4. Financial Dimension
478(1)
How Balance is Achieved in a Balanced Scorecard
478(1)
Developing a Strategy Map for a Balanced Scorecard
479(1)
Keys to a Successful Balanced Scorecard: Targets, Initiatives, Responsibility, Funding, Top Management Support
480(1)
Making Business Decisions
481(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
482(1)
Appendix Transfer Pricing
483(1)
Market Price as the Transfer Price
483(1)
Market Price and Opportunity Cost
484(2)
Variable Cost as the Transfer Price
486(1)
Full Cost Plus Profit as the Transfer Price
486(1)
Negotiated Transfer Prices
487(1)
Transfer Pricing and Income Taxes in an International Context
488(1)
Review Problem
488(3)
Key Terms
491(1)
Self Assessment
492(1)
Interactive Learning
492(1)
Questions
493(1)
Exercises
493(3)
Problems
496(7)
Cases
503(4)
Analyzing Financial Statements: A Managerial Perspective
507(44)
Why Managers Analyze Financial Statements
508(1)
Control of Operations
508(1)
Assessment of Vendors, Customers, and Other Business Partners
509(1)
Assessment of Appearance to Investors and Creditors
509(1)
Review of the Three Basic Financial Statements
509(1)
The Balance Sheet
510(1)
Current and Noncurrent Assets and Liabilities
511(1)
The Income Statement
511(1)
The Statement of Cash Flows
512(1)
Operating Activities
512(1)
Investing Activities
512(1)
Financing Activities
512(1)
Horizontal and Vertical Analysis
513(1)
Analysis of the Balance Sheet
513(2)
Analyzing the Income Statement
515(1)
Earnings Management and the Need to Compare Earnings and Cash Flow Information
516(1)
Other Sources of Information on Financial Performance
517(1)
Management Discussion and Analysis
517(1)
Credit Reports
517(1)
News Articles
517(1)
Ratio Analysis
518(1)
Profitability Ratios
518(2)
Financial Leverage
519(1)
Summary of Profitability Ratios
520(1)
Turnover Ratios
520(2)
Summary of Turnover Ratios
521(1)
Debt Related Ratios
522(1)
Summary of Debt Related Ratios
523(1)
A Managerial Perspective on the Analysis of HGW'S Financial Statements
523(1)
Control of Operations
523(1)
Stability of Vendors, Customers, and Other Business Partners
523(1)
Returning to the Situation Facing Valley Home Loan
524(1)
Appearance to Investors and Creditors
524(1)
Summary of Analyses
524(1)
Making Business Decisions
525(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
526(1)
Review Problem
526(2)
Key Terms
528(1)
Self Assessment
528(1)
Interactive Learning
529(1)
Questions
530(1)
Exercises
530(5)
Problems
535(11)
Cases
546(5)
Statement of Cash Flows
551(32)
Need for a Statement of Cash Flows
551(1)
Types of Business Activities and the Classification of Cash Flows
552(1)
Operating Activities
552(2)
Investing Activities
554(1)
Financing Activities
555(1)
The Statement of Cash Flows Prepared Using the Direct Method
555(4)
Preparing the Statement of Cash Flows Using the Indirect Method
559(1)
Statement of Cash Flows for Ravira Restaurant Supply---Indirect Method
560(3)
Interpreting Information in the Statement of Cash Flows---The Situation at Ravira Restaurant Supply
563(1)
Making Business Decisions
563(1)
Summary of Learning Objectives
564(1)
Review Problem
564(2)
Key Terms
566(1)
Self Assessment
566(1)
Questions
567(1)
Exercises
568(5)
Problems
573(9)
Cases
582(1)
Glossary 583(6)
Photo Credits 589(2)
Index 591


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