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Managing Quality: Integrating the Supply Chain,9780131302662
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Managing Quality: Integrating the Supply Chain

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780131302662

ISBN10:
0131302663
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $173.33
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Summary

This volume is a comprehensive introduction to the field of quality management, integrating the emerging body of knowledge in the areas of quality theory, quality assurance, and quality control. The author's practical approach provides examples, allowing readers to participate in and manage quality improvement in manufacturing, government, and service organizations.The volume examines differing perspectives on quality, quality theory, global quality and quality standards, strategic quality planning, the voice of the customer and the market, quality in product and process design, designing quality services, managing supplier quality in the supply chain, the tools of quality and implementing quality, statistically based quality improvement for variables, six sigma management and tools, implementing and validating the quality system.For quality control managers and other interested in greater quality management.

Table of Contents

Preface xvii
PART 1: UNDERSTANDING QUALITY CONCEPTS
1(98)
Differing Perspectives on Quality
3(28)
Recognizing Different Perspectives on Quality
3(2)
A Closer Look at Quality 1-1: Which are Better, CDs or LPs?
4(1)
What Is Quality?
5(3)
Differing Functional Perspectives on Quality
8(15)
Quality Highlight 1-1: Quality Strategy at GE
16(7)
The Three Spheres of Quality
23(2)
Quality Highlight 1-2: Federal Express Corporation
24(1)
Other Perspectives on Quality
25(1)
Arriving at a Common Understanding of Quality Using a Contingency Perspective of Quality
25(1)
Summary
26(1)
Key Terms
26(1)
Discussion Questions
27(1)
Case 1-1: FedEx: Managing Quality Day and Night
28(1)
Case 1-2: Granite Rock Company: Achieving Quality through Employees
29(2)
Quality Theory
31(30)
Introduction
31(1)
What Is Theory?
32(3)
A Closer Look at Quality 2-1: The Product That Is Quality
34(1)
Leading Contributors to Quality Theory: W. Edwards Deming
35(7)
Leading Contributors to Quality Theory: Joseph M. Juran
42(3)
A Closer Look at Quality 2-2: Juran on the Past Century of Quality
44(1)
Leading Contributors to Quality Theory: Kaoru Ishikawa
45(1)
Leading Contributors to Quality Theory: Armand Feigenbaum
46(1)
Leading Contributors to Quality Theory: Philip Crosby
47(2)
Leading Contributors to Quality Theory: Genichi Taguchi
49(1)
Leading Contributors to Quality Theory: The Rest of the Pack
50(2)
A Closer Look at Quality 2-3 Hammer Recants (Sort of), or In Search of the Lost Product to Sell
51(1)
Viewing Quality Theory from a Contingency Perspective
52(1)
Resolving the Differences in Quality Approaches: An Integrative View
53(2)
Theoretical Framework for Quality Management
55(1)
Summary
56(1)
Key Terms
56(1)
Discussion Questions
57(1)
Case 2-1: Rheaco, Inc.: Making a Quality Turnabout by Asking for Advice
58(1)
Case 2-2: Has Disney Developed a Theory of Quality Guest Services Management?
59(2)
Global Quality and International Quality Standards
61(38)
Introduction
61(1)
Managing Quality for the Multinational Firm (MNF)
62(5)
Quality Highlight 3-1: Quality in the Global Context
65(2)
Quality Improvement: The American Way
67(1)
The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award
67(13)
A Closer Look at Quality 3-1: Who Was Malcolm Baldrige?
75(4)
Quality Highlight 3-2: Clarke American Checks, Inc.
79(1)
Quality Improvement: The Japanese Way
80(5)
Quality Improvement: The European Way
85(1)
ISO 9000:2000
86(7)
Are Quality Approaches Influenced by Culture?
93(1)
Summary
93(1)
Key Terms
94(1)
Discussion Questions
94(1)
Case 3-1: University of Wolverhampton: Becoming an ISO 9000 University
95(1)
Case 3-2: Wainwright Industries: An Entirely New Philosophy of Business Based on Customer Satisfaction and Quality
96(3)
PART 2: DESIGNING AND ASSURING QUALITY
99(174)
Strategic Quality Planning
101(27)
Strategy Content
101(1)
The Importance of Time in Quality Improvement
102(1)
Leadership for Quality
103(4)
Quality Highlight 4-1: Solectron Corporation
106(1)
Quality and Ethics
107(1)
Quality as a Strategy
108(6)
Quality Strategy Process
114(3)
A Closer Look at Quality 4-1: A Mature Strategic Planning Process
115(2)
Deploying Quality
117(1)
Hoshin Kanri
Does Quality Lead to Better Business Results?
118(4)
Summary
122(1)
Key Terms
122(1)
Discussion Questions
122(1)
Problems
123(1)
Case 4-1: Ames Rubber Corporation: Realizing Multiple Benefits through Improved Quality
124(2)
Case 4-2: Make No Mistake---At Eastman Chemical, Quality is a Strategic Issue
126(2)
The Voice of the Customer
128(30)
Customer-Driven Quality
129(3)
A Closer Look at Quality 5-1: Customer Service on the Internet
130(2)
What Is the Voice of the Customer?
132(1)
Customer-Relationship Management
133(4)
A Closer Look at Quality 5-2: The Customer Is Always . . . Thwarted?
135(2)
The ``Gaps'' Approach to Service Design
137(1)
Segmenting Customers and Markets
137(2)
Strategic Alliances between Customers and Suppliers
139(3)
Communicating with Customers
142(1)
Actively Solicited Customer-Feedback Approaches
143(5)
Quality Highlight 5-1: ADAC Industries
147(1)
Passively Solicited Customer-Feedback Approaches
148(3)
Managing Customer Retention and Loyalty
151(1)
Customer-Relationship Management (CRM) Systems
151(1)
A Word on Excellent Design
152(1)
Summary
153(1)
Key Terms
153(1)
Discussion Questions
154(1)
Case 5-1: Customer Quality Feedback at Apple Computer
155(1)
Case 5-2: Chaparral Steel: Achieving High Quality through a Commitment to Both External and Internal Customers
156(2)
The Voice of the Market
158(25)
What Do We Mean by the Voice of the Market?
159(1)
Gaining Insight through Benchmarking
159(4)
Quality Highlight 6-1: Pal's Sudden Service
162(1)
Purposes of Benchmarking
163(1)
Difficulties in Monitoring and Measuring Performance
164(2)
Commonly Benchmarked Performance Measures
166(1)
Best-in-Class Benchmarking
167(1)
Best-of-the-Best Benchmarking
168(1)
Business Process Benchmarking
168(5)
Leading and Managing the Benchmarking Effort
173(1)
Baselining and Reengineering
174(1)
Problems with Benchmarking
174(2)
A Closer Look at Quality 6.1: The Legal Environment of Benchmarking
175(1)
Summary
176(1)
Key Terms
177(1)
Discussion Questions
177(1)
Problems
178(1)
Case 6-1: Amgen Corporation: Using Benchmarking as a Means of Coping with Rapid Growth
179(2)
Case 6-2: Ameritech: Making Benchmarking a Part of the Process Improvement Toolkit
181(2)
Quality in Product and Process Design
183(32)
Designing Products for Quality
184(1)
The Design Process
184(3)
Quality Function Deployment (QFD)
187(5)
Technology in Design
192(2)
Prototyping Methodologies
194(8)
A Closer Look at Quality 7-1: Ski Design
196(3)
A Closer Look at Quality 7-2: Why It Takes a Rocket Scientist to Design a Golf Ball
199(2)
Quality Highlight 7-1: Focus on DFM at General Motors
201(1)
Designing for Reliability
202(6)
Environmental Considerations in Design
208(1)
Summary
209(1)
Key Terms
209(1)
Discussion Questions
209(1)
Problems
210(2)
Case 7-1: Designing the Ford Taurus: Why Quality Had to Be Job 1
212(1)
Case 7-2: Nucor Corporation: Producing Quality Steel by Stressing Sound Management Practices
213(2)
Designing Quality Services
215(29)
Differences between Services and Manufacturing
216(3)
What Do Services Customers Want?
219(2)
Quality Highlight 8-1: Ritz-Carlton Hotels
220(1)
Servqual
221(7)
Designing and Improving the Services Transaction
228(4)
A Closer Look at Quality 8-1: Moments of Truth in Action
231(1)
The Customer Benefits Package
232(1)
The Globalization of Services
233(1)
Improving Customer Service in Government
234(3)
A Closer Look at Quality 8-2: Government Service Quality: A Stop-and-Go Process
236(1)
Quality in Health Care
237(1)
A Theory for Service Quality Management
237(1)
Summary
238(1)
Key Terms
238(1)
Discussion Questions
239(1)
Problems
239(2)
Case 8-1: Yahoo! Designs Quality Services with Customers in Mind
241(1)
Case 8-2: UPS: Delivering the Total Package in Customer Service
242(2)
Managing Supplier Quality in the Supply Chain
244(29)
The Value Chain
245(2)
A Closer Look at Quality 9-1: Supply-Chain Concerns after 9/11
246(1)
Supplier Partnering
247(4)
Quality Highlight 9-1: Supplier Partnerships at Mercedes-Benz
250(1)
Applying the Contingency Perspective to Supplier Partnering
251(1)
A Supplier Development Program: QS 9000
252(5)
Acceptance Sampling and Statistical Sampling Techniques
257(11)
Quality Highlight 9-2: Integrating Forward along the Supply Chain: 3M Dental Products Division
257(11)
Summary
268(1)
Key Terms
268(1)
Discussion Questions
268(1)
Problems
269(1)
Case 9-1: SBC: Setting High Standards for Suppliers and Rewarding Supplier Performance
270(1)
Case 9-2: Managing the Supply Chain at Honeywell
271(2)
PART 3: IMPLEMENTING QUALITY
273(162)
The Tools of Quality
275(38)
Improving the System
275(1)
Ishikawa's Basic Seven Tools of Quality
276(16)
The Seven New Tools for Improvement
292(14)
Summary
306(1)
Key Terms
306(1)
Discussion Questions
306(1)
Problems
307(2)
Case 10-1: Corporate Universities: Teaching the Tools of Quality
309(2)
Case 10-2: Lanier: Achieving Maximum Performance by Supporting Quality Products with Quality Services
311(2)
Managing Quality Improvement Teams and Projects
313(32)
Leading Teams for Quality Improvement
315(5)
A Closer Look at Quality 11-1: Empowerment in Action
317(3)
Types of Teams
320(3)
Implementing Teams
323(7)
A Closer Look at Quality 11-2: Lessons from Effective Teams Outside the Business World
324(6)
Managing and Controlling Projects
330(7)
Summary
337(2)
Key Terms
339(1)
Discussion Questions
339(1)
Problems
340(2)
Case 11-1: Whole Foods: Using Teamwork as a Recipe for Success
342(1)
Case 11-2: The Boeing 777: Designing and Building an Airplane Using Virtual Teams
343(2)
Statistically-Based Quality Improvement for Variables
345(36)
Statistical Fundamentals
346(5)
Quality Highlight 12-1: Statistical Tools in Action
347(4)
Process Control Charts
351(17)
Some Control Chart Concepts for Variables
368(2)
Process Capability for Variables
370(5)
Other Statistical Techniques in Quality Management
375(1)
Summary
376(1)
Key Terms
376(1)
Discussion Questions
376(1)
Problems
376(3)
Case 12-1: Ore-Ida Fries
379(2)
Statistically-Based Quality Improvement for Attributes
381(20)
Generic Process for Developing Attributes Charts
382(1)
Understanding Attributes Charts
382(7)
Attributes Charts Summary
389(1)
Choosing the Right Attributes Chart
390(2)
Reliability Models
392(4)
Summary
396(1)
Key Terms
396(1)
Discussion Questions
396(1)
Problems
397(1)
Case 13-1: Decision Sciences Institute National Conference
398(3)
Six-Sigma Management and Tools
401(34)
What Is Six Sigma?
402(2)
Organizing Six Sigma
404(1)
DMAIC Overview
405(2)
A Closer Look at Quality 14-1: DMAIC In Action
407(1)
Define Phase
407(4)
Measure Phase
411(5)
Analyze Phase
416(3)
Improve Phase
419(1)
Control Phase
420(1)
Taguchi Design of Experiments
420(2)
Background of the Taguchi Method
422(2)
The Taguchi Process
424(3)
Design for Six Sigma
427(2)
Lensing Six Sigma from a Contingency Perspective
429(1)
Summary
429(1)
Key Terms
429(1)
Discussion Questions
430(1)
Problems
430(3)
Case 14-1: The Neiman-Marcus Cookie
433(2)
PART 4: FOREVER IMPROVING THE QUALITY SYSTEM
435(66)
Managing Learning for Quality Improvement
437(34)
Effective Story Telling
438(2)
Individual Learning and Organizational Learning
440(3)
Quality Highlight 15-1: Motorola's Quality University
442(1)
A Model to Guide Training Development in an Organization
443(14)
Adult Learning
457(4)
Training Tools
461(2)
Evaluating Training
463(3)
Summary
466(1)
Key Terms
466(1)
Discussion Questions
466(1)
Case 15-1: British Petroleum: Achieving Organizational Learning through the Creative Use of Video Technology
467(2)
Case 15-2: At Globe Metallurgical, Training Is a Way of Life
469(2)
Implementing and Validating the Quality System
471(30)
Building Blocks for the System of Quality Improvement
472(4)
Internal Validation: Documenting and Assessing the Quality System
476(2)
Quality Audits
478(8)
A Closer Look at Quality 16-1: A Simple Self-Assessment Tool
478(7)
A Closer Look at Quality 16-2: Quality Audits in Action
485(1)
Externally Validating the Quality System
486(4)
Summary
490(1)
Key Terms
491(1)
Discussion Questions
491(1)
Problems
491(1)
Case 16-1: Setting Priorities Using the Baldrige Criteria
491(10)
Appendix 501(4)
Glossary 505(10)
Index 515

Excerpts

Much has happened since publication of the first edition ofManaging Quality: An Integrative Approachin 2000. The book has been adopted by faculty at many top universities and has also been utilized within many firms. It has been translated into Chinese and rose to number four on the list of quality-related bestsellers at Amazon.com-Japan. It appears that there is a market for a text with an unbiased contingency perspective on quality. An explanation of some of the themes and core values that permeate this text follows. MAJOR THEMESIntegrative Approach.Workers and managers in organizations are somewhat limited by their particular functional preparation and specialization (going back to their educational training). This narrow preparation filters how they analyze and cognitively interpret information. However, quality management has emerged as a discipline that is not owned by any of the functional areas such as operations management, human resources, marketing, and so on.An example can be seen when attempting to define quality. If a CEO states in a company meeting that "we need to improve quality," she might be thinking that, from a strategic point of view, the firm needs to become more competitive. The marketer in the audience hears this as an admonition to improve customer responsiveness. The engineer envisions tighter specifications, and the production worker worries that the company is going to be downsized.Just using the unreliable term "quality" results in this problem. Therefore, students of quality must recognize this imperfection in communication about quality in order to improve organizational understanding. This is the basis for theintegrative approachused in this text. Students will view quality from a variety of functional perspectives and, in the process, gain a better understanding of the problems associated with improving quality.Contingency Approach.There is no "one way" or "magic pill" that companies can implement to improve quality. Therefore, thecontingency approachis used to instruct students how to assess the current condition of a firm and identify gaps in quality deployment as a basis for future improvement. Thus, improvement is based on the contingent variables that are operative in a firm as it exists. This contingency approach is introduced in Chapter 1 and permeates the rest of the text. It is a premise upon which everything else is based.The contingency approach has been successfully taught by the author in undergraduate and graduate courses, as well as at a number of firms and organizations. Of course, a sound understanding of quality fundamentals is important if students are to be able to make effective strategic choices for the future. FEATURES OFTHIS TEXTOrganization.The text is organized as follows: First, an understanding of basic and advanced quality concepts is provided. Next, the focus moves to assuring quality through product, service, and process design. Third, the implementation of quality management and control is presented. The final section of chapters focuses on approaches for continuously improving the quality system. The book's organization reflects the logical life cycle that firms follow in the quality journey.Coverage of Quality Tools.Quality tools and approaches--such as statistical quality control, the basic seven tools, Six Sigma, the seven tools for management, and the Taguchi method--are presented. Implementation problems with these tools are also discussed. The philosophy adopted in this text is that organizations should not necessarily focus onquality tool choiceas the strategic emphasis in quality planning. Instead, skilled managers will assess operational variables in the organization, such as leadership, respect for employees, learning and knowledge creation, customer focus, and others. If there are gaps between the current state a


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