The Meaning of Jesus: Two Visions

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  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2/2/2010
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publications

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Was Jesus born of a virgin? Did he know he was the Messiah? Was he bodily resurrected from the dead? Did he intentionally die to redeem humankind? Was Jesus God?

Two leading Jesus scholars with widely divergent views go right to the heart of these questions and others, presenting the opposing visions of Jesus that shape our faith today.

Two well-known theological scholars debate the most important biblical questions of the time and discuss what these differences mean for Christians today.

Author Biography

Marcus J. Borg is Hundere Distinguished Professor of Religion at Oregon State University.

Table of Contents

Introductionp. vii
How Do We Know About Jesus?
Seeing Jesus: Sources, Lenses, and Methodp. 3
Knowing Jesus: Faith and Historyp. 15
What Did Jesus Do and Teach?
The Mission and Message of Jesusp. 31
Jesus Before and After Easter: Jewish Mystic and Christian Messiahp. 53
The Death of Jesus
Why Was Jesus Killed?p. 79
The Crux of Faithp. 93
"God Raised Jesus from the Dead"
The Transforming Reality of the Bodily Resurrectionp. 111
The Truth of Easterp. 129
Was Jesus God?
Jesus and Godp. 145
The Divinity of Jesusp. 157
The Birth of Jesus
Born of a Virgin?p. 171
The Meaning of the Birth Storiesp. 179
"He Will Come Again in Glory"
The Second Coming Then and Nowp. 189
The Future of Jesusp. 197
Jesus and the Christian Life
The Truth of the Gospel and Christian Livingp. 207
A Vision of the Christian Lifep. 229
Notesp. 251
Indexp. 281
Plusp. 289
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.


The Meaning of Jesus
Two Visions

Chapter One

Seeing Jesus: Sources, Lenses, and Method

Marcus Borg

How do we know about Jesus? What are our sources, what are they like, and how do we use them?1 For most of the Christian centuries, the answers to these questions seemed obvious. Our sources? The New Testament as a whole, and the four gospels in particular. What are they like? The gospels were seen as historical narratives, reporting what Jesus said and did, based on eyewitness testimony. How do we use them? By collecting together what they say about Jesus and combining them into a whole. Importantly, it did not require faith to see the gospels in this way; there was as yet no reason to think otherwise.

This way of seeing the gospels led to a common Christian image of who Jesus was and why he mattered. Who was he? The only Son of God, born of the virgin Mary. His purpose? To die for the sins of the world. His message? About many things, but most centrally about the importance of believing in him, for what was at stake was eternal life.

But over the last two hundred years among historical scholars, both within and outside of the church, this common image of Jesus has dissolved. Its central elements are seen no longer as going back to the historical Jesus, but as the product of the early Christian movement in the decades after his death. Jesus as a historical figure was not very much like the most common image of him.

As I write these words, I am sitting on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. I am here with a group of thirty Christians assisting my wife, Marianne, an Episcopal priest who leads educational-spiritual pilgrimages to Israel. My role is to provide historical background and commentary. As I do so, I often feel like the designated debunker. Again and again I find myself saying about holy sites associated with Jesus, "Well, it probably didn't happen here," or, "Well, it probably didn't happen at all." Of course, I have more to say than that, but it is a frequent refrain.

For example, today as we drove past Cana, I told the group that the story of Jesus changing water into wine at the wedding at Cana is most probably not a historical report but a symbolic narrative. At the site marking the Sermon on the Mount, I said that it was unlikely that Jesus ever delivered the Sermon on the Mount as a connected whole, even though many of the individual sayings probably go back to him. In Nazareth, I said Jesus probably was born here, and not in Bethlehem.

I sometimes feel like a debunker in my writing as well. A significant portion of what I have to say is, "This story is probably not historically factual," or, "Jesus probably didn't say that." And yet, for reasons I will explain later, I also find the nonhistorical material to be very important and meaningful. I am not among the relatively few scholars who think that only that which is historically factual matters.

The Nature of the Gospels

But for now I want to explain why the issue comes up so often, whether on pilgrimage to the Holy Land or in my work as a Jesus scholar. The issue arises because of the nature of the Christian gospels, our primary sources for knowing about Jesus. Two statements about the nature of the gospels are crucial for grasping the historical task: (1) They are a developing tradition. (2) They are a mixture of history remembered and history metaphorized. Both statements are foundational to the historical study of Jesus and Christian origins, and both need explaining.

The Gospels as a Developing Tradition

The four gospels of the New Testament are the product of a developing tradition. During the decades between the death of Jesus around the year 30 and the writing of the gospels in the last third of the first century (roughly between 70 and 100), the traditions about Jesus developed. More than one factor was responsible. There was a need to adapt the traditions about Jesus to new settings and issues as early Christian communities moved through time and into the broader Mediterranean world. Moreover, the traditions about Jesus grew because the experience of the risen living Christ within the community shaped perceptions of Jesus' ultimate identity and significance.

As developing traditions, the gospels contain two kinds of material: some goes back to Jesus, and some is the product of early Christian communities. To use an archaeological analogy, the gospels contain earlier and later layers. To use a vocal analogy, the gospels contain more than one voice: the voice of Jesus, and the voices of the community. The quest for the historical Jesus involves the attempt to separate out these layers or voices.

History Remembered and History Metaphorized

The gospels combine history remembered with history metaphorized. By the former, I mean simply that some of the things reported in the gospels really happened. Jesus really did do and really did say some of the deeds and teachings reported about him.

By history metaphorized, I mean the use of metaphorical language and metaphorical narratives to express the meaning of the story of Jesus.2 I define metaphor broadly to include both symbol and story. Thus the category includes individual metaphors, such as Jesus is the light of the world, and metaphorical narratives, where the story as a whole functions metaphorically. Metaphorical language is intrinsically nonliteral; its central meaning is "to see as"—to see something as something else. To say Jesus is the light of the world is not to say that he is literally a light, but means to see him as the light of the world. Thus, even though metaphorical language is not literally true, it can be powerfully true in a nonliteral sense.3

As I use the phrase, history metaphorized includes a wide variety of gospel material. Sometimes a story combines both history remembered . . .

The Meaning of Jesus
Two Visions
. Copyright © by Marcus Borg . Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Excerpted from The Meaning of Jesus: Two Visions by Marcus J. Borg, N. T. Wright
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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Excellent discussion. August 1, 2011
I enjoyed the textbook tremendously. I am a Christian who also wants to be intellectually honest in my beliefs. I can honestly say that my interpretation of the meaning of Jesus has been affected by the arguments presented in this textbook - an apt title for such an impactful textbook. The good thing is that in the end, both authors believe that the purpose of being a Christian is to love others, and bring social justice to this world. And that is one thing we can all agree on!
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The Meaning of Jesus: Two Visions: 5 out of 5 stars based on 1 user reviews.

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