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Medical Sociology,9780131113916
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Medical Sociology

by
ISBN13:

9780131113916

ISBN10:
0131113917
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

This guide provides a brief introduction to navigating the Internet and teaches you how to be a critical consumer of online resources. It includes references related specifically to the discipline of sociology as well as access to the Research Navigator Website. Book jacket.

Author Biography

William C. Cockerham: University of Alabama at Birmingham

Table of Contents

PREFACE xi
1 MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY 1(18)
Defining Health
2(1)
Contrasting Ideas about Health and Social Behavior
3(4)
The Reemergence of Infectious Diseases
7(5)
The Development of Medical Sociology
12(5)
Summary
17(1)
Medical Sociology Internet Sites
18(1)
2 EPIDEMIOLOGY 19(21)
Epidemiological Measures
20(2)
The Development of Epidemiology
22(3)
The Complexity of Modern Ills: Heart Disease
25(4)
Disease and Modernization
29(1)
AIDS
30(8)
Summary
38(1)
Epidemiology Internet Sites
38(2)
3 THE SOCIAL DEMOGRAPHY OF HEALTH 40(32)
Age
40(4)
Gender
44(7)
Race
51(11)
Socioeconomic Status
62(8)
Summary
70(1)
Social Demography of Health Internet Sites
70(2)
4 SOCIAL STRESS 72(22)
Cooley, Thomas, and Goffman: Symbolic Interaction
73(2)
Durkheim: Functionalism
75(4)
Stress
79(2)
Social Factors and Stress
81(11)
Summary
92(1)
Social Stress Internet Sites
93(1)
5 HEALTH BEHAVIOR AND LIFESTYLES 94(24)
Health Lifestyles
95(17)
Preventive Care
112(4)
Summary
116(1)
Health Behavior and Lifestyles Internet Sites
117(1)
6 ILLNESS BEHAVIOR 118(23)
Self Care
119(1)
Sociodemographic Variables
120(15)
Recognizing and Coping with Illness Symptoms
135(4)
Summary and Conclusion
139(1)
Illness Behavior Internet Sites
140(1)
7 THE SICK ROLE 141(26)
Illness as Deviance
141(3)
The Functionalist Approach to Deviance
144(1)
The Sick Role
145(7)
Criticism of the Sick Role
152(6)
Labeling Theory
158(3)
Sickness as Social Deviance?
161(1)
Being Sick and Disabled
162(2)
Stigma
164(1)
Summary
165(1)
The Sick Role Internet Sites
165(2)
8 HEALING OPTIONS 167(18)
Osteopaths
167(1)
Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)
168(2)
Chiropractors
170(1)
Faith Healers
171(4)
Folk Healers
175(8)
Summary
183(1)
Healing Options Internet Sites
183(2)
9 DOCTOR-PATIENT INTERACTION 185(22)
Models of Interaction
186(4)
Misunderstandings in Communication
190(3)
Male Physicians and Women Patients
193(1)
Women Physicians
194(2)
Cultural Differences in Communication
196(2)
Patient Compliance
198(1)
The Future of Doctor-Patient Relations
199(1)
Doctor-Patient Relations and New Technology
200(2)
The New Genetics
202(3)
Summary
205(1)
Doctor-Patient Interaction Internet Sites
205(2)
10 PHYSICIANS 207(22)
The Professionalization of the Physician
207(8)
The Socialization of the Physician
215(7)
The Power Structure of American Medicine
222(5)
Summary
227(1)
Physicians Internet Sites
228(1)
11 THE PHYSICIAN IN A CHANGING SOCIETY 229(17)
Social Control of Medical Practice
231(4)
Countervailing Power
235(1)
Government Regulation
236(1)
Managed Care
237(1)
The Coming of the Corporation
238(2)
The Changing Physician-Patient Relationship
240(1)
The Deprofessionalization of Physicians
241(2)
The Evolution of the Organization of Medical Practice
243(1)
Summary
244(1)
The Physician in a Changing Society Internet Sites
244(2)
12 NURSES, PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS, PHARMACISTS, AND MIDWIVES 246(21)
Nursing: Past and Present
247(11)
Nursing: Future Trends
258(3)
Physician Assistants
261(1)
Pharmacists
262(1)
Midwives
263(1)
Summary
264(1)
Nurses, Physician Assistants, Pharmacists, and Midwives Internet Sites
265(2)
13 HOSPITALS 267(22)
The Development of the Hospital as a Social Institution
268(4)
Hospitals in the United States
272(2)
The Organization of the Nonprofit Community Hospital
274(7)
The Hospital-Patient Role
281(4)
The Rising Cost of Hospitalization
285(2)
Summary
287(1)
Hospitals Internet Sites
288(1)
14 HEALTH CARE DELIVERY AND SOCIAL POLICY IN THE UNITED STATES 289(24)
Rising Costs
290(5)
Equity in Health Services
295(1)
Distribution of Services
296(2)
Overview of Health Care Delivery
298(3)
Social Legislation in Health Care
301(4)
Health Reform
305(3)
Health Care: A Right or a Privilege?
308(3)
Summary and Conclusion
311(1)
Health Care Delivery and Social Policy in the United States Internet Sites
312(1)
15 HEALTH CARE IN DEVELOPED COUNTRIES 313(30)
Socialized Medicine: Canada, Great Britain, and Sweden
319(10)
Decentralized National Health Programs: Japan, Germany, the Netherlands, and France
329(11)
Conclusion
340(1)
Health Care in Developed Countries Internet Sites
341(2)
16 HEALTH CARE IN FORMER SOCIALIST, SOCIALIST, AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES 343(26)
Socialist Medicine: Alterations in Russia, Poland, Hungary, and China
344(12)
Socialized Medicine: Saudi Arabia and Kenya
356(4)
Decentralized National Health: Mexico
360(3)
Fee-for-Service: South Africa
363(3)
Conclusion
366(1)
Health Care in Former Socialist, Socialist, and Developing Countries Internet Sites
367(2)
REFERENCES 369(38)
PHOTO CREDITS 407(1)
NAME INDEX 408(7)
SUBJECT INDEX 415

Excerpts

The field of medical sociology has undergone considerable change since the first edition of this textbook appeared in 1978. At that time, much of the research in medical sociology was dependent upon the sponsorship of physicians, and a clear division of labor existed between sociologists working in academic departments in universities and those working in health institutions. Today, that situation has changed drastically. Medical sociology is no longer highly dependent on the medical profession for funding or focus--although a strong alliance continues to exist in many cases. Medical sociologists exercise their craft in an increasingly independent manner, either working with a greater degree of partnership with health care professionals or functioning as medicine's critics should the situation warrant it. Furthermore, research and teaching in medical sociology in both universities and health institutions are increasingly similar in the application of theory and usefulness in addressing problems relevant to clinical practice. In sum, medical sociology has evolved into a mature, objective, and independent field of study and work. Medical sociology has also experienced significant growth worldwide in numbers of practitioners. In many countries, including the United States, Canada, Australia, Great Britain, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, and Singapore, medical sociologists are either the largest or one of the largest specialty groups in sociology. The European Society for Health and Medical Sociology is a large and active professional society, as are the medical sociology sections of the American, British, and German sociological associations. In 1999, the American and British medical sociology sections held their first joint meeting at London University's Royal Holloway College. Elsewhere, the Japanese Society of Health and Medical Sociology is working to further develop the field in its nation, while medical sociologists in Latin America hold regional conferences on a regular basis and have their own Spanish-language journals. Numerous books, journals, college and university courses, medical programs, and lecture series in medical sociology now exist in different parts of the world. This textbook, for example, has been translated into Chinese by Yang Hui and Zhang Tuohong of Beijing Medical University and published by Huaxia Publishing House in Beijing. It has also been published in Chinese in Taiwan by Wu-Nan Book Company. Additionally, it has been translated into Spanish by Lourdes Lostao of the Public University of Navarra in Spain and published by Prentice Hall in Madrid. In the United States, several universities offer specialties in medical sociology, while two universities, the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of California at San Francisco--both with large medical campuses--offer doctorates in medical sociology. Columbia University in New York City offers a combined Ph.D. program in sociology and public health, while medical sociology is a major focus in sociology departments at the University of Kentucky, Rutgers University, Indiana University, the Kent State and University of Akron Program, Florida State University, and the University of Miami (Florida). Additionally, there are departments of social medicine, which include medical sociologists, at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as McGill University in Montreal. The principal goal of this textbook since its inception has been to introduce students to medical sociology by presenting the ideas, concepts, themes, theories, and research findings in the field. This edition--the ninth--continues this approach. The intent is to identify and discuss the most current issues, debates, and findings in medical sociology.


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