CART

(0) items

The Memory of the Temple and the Making of the Rabbis,9780812244571
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!
FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

The Memory of the Temple and the Making of the Rabbis

by
ISBN13:

9780812244571

ISBN10:
0812244575
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
10/9/2012
Publisher(s):
Univ of Pennsylvania Pr
List Price: $69.95

eTextbook


 
Duration
Price
$83.94

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $61.81

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the edition with a publication date of 10/9/2012.
What is included with this book?
  • The eBook copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically only the book itself is included.

Summary

When the rabbis composed the Mishnah in the late second or early third century C.E., the Jerusalem Temple had been destroyed for more then a century. Why, then, do the Temple and its ritual feature so prominently in the Mishnah? Against the view that the rabbis were reacting directly to the destruction and asserting that nothing had changed, Naftali S. Cohn argues that the memory of the Temple served a political function for the rabbis in their own time. They described the Temple and its ritual in a unique way that helped to establish their authority within the context of Roman dominance. At the time the Mishnah was created, the rabbis were not the only ones talking extensively about the Temple: other Judaeans (including followers of Jesus), Christians, and even Roman emperors produced texts and other cultural artifacts centered on the Jerusalem Temple. Looking back at the procedures of Temple ritual in the Mishnah, the rabbis created a past and a Temple in their own image, which lent legitimacy to their claim to be the only authentic purveyors of Jewish tradition and the traditional Jewish way of life. Seizing on the Temple, they sought to establish and consolidate their own position of importance within the complex social and religious landscape of Jewish society in Roman Palestine.


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...