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Mental Health Concepts and Techniques for the Occupational Therapy Assistant,9780781719759
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Mental Health Concepts and Techniques for the Occupational Therapy Assistant

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780781719759

ISBN10:
0781719755
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
12/3/1999
Publisher(s):
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
List Price: $60.75
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  • Mental Health Concepts and Techniques for the Occupational Therapy Assistant
    Mental Health Concepts and Techniques for the Occupational Therapy Assistant




Summary

The Third Edition of this classic text provides the basic foundation for the practice of occupational therapy for persons with mental health problems. This invaluable reference reflects new developments in basic neuroscience, psychopharmacology, occupational therapy theory and treatment methods. The text is written in an engaging, user-friendly style, offering ample tables, group protocols, case studies, and text boxes. In addition to providing information on newer medications such as SSRIs and atypical antipsychotics, this edition offers three additional treatment models: cognitive-behavioral, psychoeducation, and psychiatric rehabilitation. A new chapter on "Who Is the Consumer?" as well as increased information on the applications of DSM-IV diagnoses are covered.

Table of Contents

Preface v
Acknowledgements vii
List of Figures
xiii
List of Tables
xv
List of Boxes
xvii
SECTION I HISTORY AND THEORY
History and Basic Concepts
3(14)
Mental Health and Mental Illness
3(1)
Relation of Occupation to Mental Health
4(1)
Occupational Therapy in Mental Health: History and Trends
5(4)
The Role of the Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant
9(5)
Summary and Conclusion
14(3)
Medical and Psychological Models of Mental Health and Illness
17(28)
Theory of Object Relations
18(5)
Developmental Theory
23(3)
Behavioral Theories
26(4)
Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy
30(4)
Client-Centered Therapy
34(3)
Neuroscientific Theories
37(2)
Psychiatric Rehabilitation
39(4)
Summary and Conclusion
43(2)
Some Practice Models for Occupational Therapy in Mental Health
45(42)
Development of Adaptive Skills
47(5)
Role Acquisition and Social Skills Training
52(11)
Psychoeducation
63(5)
Sensory Integration
68(6)
Cognitive Disabilities
74(10)
Summary and Conclusion
84(3)
The Model of Human Occupation
87(16)
Basic Concepts
87(1)
An Open and Dynamic Systems Model
87(2)
Occupational Behavior As an Energetic Exchange Among Individual, Task, and Environment
89(1)
The Self-Organizing Nature of Occupational Behavior
89(2)
Volition Subsystem
91(2)
Mind-Brain-Body Performance Subsystem
93(1)
Interaction Among the Subsystems
94(1)
The Environment
95(3)
Human Occupation in Relation to Other Practice Models
98(5)
Human Occupation and Mental health Throughout the Life Span
103(22)
Motivation Toward Occupation
103(1)
Changes in Occupation Over the Life Span
104(3)
Later Adulthood
107(1)
Summary
108(1)
Mental Health Factors Throughout the Life Span
108(12)
Summary and Conclusion
120(5)
SECTION II CONTEXT
Understanding Psychiatric Diagnosis: The DSM-IV
125(24)
Psychiatric Diagnosis: An Evolving Science
125(2)
The Diagnostic Categories of DSM-IV
127(19)
Applications of DSM-IV Diagnoses to Occupational Therapy
146(1)
Summary and Conclusion
147(2)
Treatment Settings
149(32)
The Scope of Patients, Clients, and Consumers
149(1)
The Scope of Settings
150(1)
Inpatient Settings
151(8)
Outpatient Settings
159(5)
Home Health Care
164(1)
Community Residences
165(1)
Environmental Concepts
166(4)
Additional Treatment Theories and Practice Models
170(6)
Summary
176(5)
Psychotropic Medications and Other Biological Treatments
181(14)
Psychotropic Medications
181(8)
Other Biological Treatments
189(3)
Summary
192(3)
Who is the Consumer?
195(24)
Populations by Age Group
195(5)
Family Members
200(2)
Family Caregivers
202(3)
Cultural Difference
205(1)
Populations in Economic Distress
206(3)
Medical Problems and Physical Disabilities
209(4)
Summary
213(6)
SECTION III INTERACTING WITH PATIENTS
Therapeutic Use of Self
219(16)
Roles in the Therapeutic Relationship
220(1)
Therapeutic Qualities
221(3)
Developing Therapeutic Qualities
224(1)
Techniques for Relating to Patients
225(2)
Issues That Arise in Therapeutic Relationships
227(2)
Ethics
229(3)
Ending the Therapeutic Relationship
232(1)
Summary
232(3)
Responding to Symptoms and Behaviors
235(36)
A Framework of Concepts About Symptoms
235(3)
Response Variables
238(1)
Response Strategies
239(28)
Summary and Conclusion
267(4)
Safety Techniques
271(14)
Universal Precautions
271(3)
Controlling the Environment
274(3)
Medical Emergencies and First Aid
277(3)
Psychiatric Emergencies
280(3)
Teaching Consumers About Safety
283(1)
Summary and Conclusion
283(2)
Group Concepts and Techniques
285(36)
Definition and Purpose of Group Treatment
285(1)
Group Dynamics: Review of Basic Concepts
286(7)
Development of Group Skills
293(2)
How Therapy Groups Are Different From Other Groups
295(1)
Role of the Leader in an Activity Group
295(8)
Program Development
303(8)
Starting a New Group
311(3)
Adaptations of Groups for Very Regressed Individuals
314(1)
Other Models for Groups
315(1)
Program Evaluation
315(1)
Summary and Conclusion
316(5)
SECTION IV OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PROCESS
Overview of the Intervention Process
321(14)
Eight Stages in the Intervention Process
321(8)
A Holistic Perpective
329(1)
How Theory Relates to the Occupational Therapy Process
329(1)
Clinical Reasoning
330(3)
Summary and Conclusion
333(2)
Data Collection and Evaluation
335(30)
Definition and Purpose of Evaluation
335(1)
Assets and Deficits
336(1)
Concepts Central to the Evaluation Process
337(2)
Roles of the Registered Occupational Therapist and the Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant
339(2)
The COTA's Methods and Areas of Data Collection
341(1)
Review of Medical Records
341(1)
Interviewing
342(3)
Observation
345(6)
Structured Assessments
351(10)
The Performance Context for Evaluation
361(1)
Documentation and Communication of Evaluation Data
361(1)
Summary and Conclusion
362(3)
Treatment Planning
365(22)
Treatment Planning in Psychiatry
366(1)
Using Practice Models to Apply Clinical Reasoning in Treatment Planning
367(1)
Steps in Treatment Planning
368(2)
Partnership with the Client or Consumer
370(1)
General Goals of Psychiatric Occupational Therapy
371(4)
How to Write a Treatment Goal
375(3)
Identifying Treatment Principles
378(1)
Selecting Treatment Methods
379(2)
Implementing and Monitoring Treatment and Modifying the Plan
381(1)
Continuity of Care Across Settings
381(1)
Quality Assurance
381(3)
Continuous Quality Improvement
384(1)
Summary and Conclusion
384(3)
Medical Records and Documentation
387(28)
Purpose and Uses of Medical Records
387(2)
Types of Records
389(1)
Documentation of Occupational Therapy Services
390(6)
Essential Content for Occupational Therapy Notes
396(2)
Specific Types of Documentation
398(11)
Documentation Review
409(1)
Summary and Conclusion
409(6)
SECTION V OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY METHODS
Activities of Daily Living
415(16)
Daily Living Skills
417(11)
Summary and Conclusion
428(3)
Work, Homemaking, and Child Care
431(18)
Vocational Activities
431(11)
Educational Activities
442(1)
Home Management and Caregiver Skills
443(2)
Summary and Conclusion
445(4)
Leisure Skills
449(8)
Leisure Exploration
449(1)
Leisure Planning
450(1)
Leisure Activities
451(4)
Summary and Conclusion
455(2)
Psychosocial Skills and Psychological Components
457(14)
Needs and Their Relationship to Psychosocial Skills and Psychological Components
457(2)
Occupational Therapy's Domain of Concern
459(1)
Performance Components and the Roles of Occupational Therapy Practitioners
460(1)
Psychological Components
461(1)
Social Skills and Components
461(3)
Self-Management Skills
464(5)
Summary and Conclusion
469(2)
Cognitive and Sensorimotor Activities
471(8)
Cognitive Integration and Cognitive Components
471(4)
Sensorimotor Components
475(2)
Summary and Conclusion
477(2)
Analyzing, Adapting, and Grading Activities
479(18)
Selection of Activities
479(1)
Analysis of Activities
480(1)
Adaptation of Activity
481(4)
Gradation of Activity
485(3)
Activity Analysis Based on Theory: Cognitive Disabilities
488(4)
Analysis: An Ongoing Process
492(1)
Summary and Conclusion
492(5)
SECTION VI PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Supervision
497(16)
Definition and Functions of Supervision
497(1)
Goals of Supervision
498(3)
Responsibilities of the Supervisor
501(3)
Factors Affecting Communication in Supervision
504(1)
The Supervisory Contract
505(1)
Getting the Most From Supervision
506(1)
Resolving Conflicts in Supervision
506(2)
Emerging Models of Supervision
508(1)
Becoming a Supervisor
508(3)
Summary and Conclusion
511(2)
Organizing Yourself
513(32)
Priorities
513(1)
Scheduling
514(2)
Paperwork
516(1)
The Electronic Revolution: Myths and Reality
517(1)
Management of Supplies and Equipment
518(1)
Organizing Space
519(2)
Delegating
521(1)
Summary and Conclusion
521(2)
APPENDICES
Appendix A: Case Examples
523(18)
Case 1: A 21-Year-Old Woman with Depression
523(1)
Case 2: A 72-Year-Old Woman with Alzheimer's Disease
524(2)
Case 3: A 54-Year-Old Woman with Schizophrenia, Paranoid Type
526(1)
Case 4: A 22-Year-Old Man with Chronic Schizophrenia and Mild Mental Retardation
527(2)
Case 5: A 30-Year-Old Man with Bipolar I Disorder
529(3)
Case 6: A 22-Year-Old Woman with Polysubstance Dependence and Dependent Personality Disorder
532(2)
Case 7: A 37-Year-Old Man with Alcohol Dependence Disorder
534(2)
Case 8: A 21-Year-Old Woman with Cocaine Dependence, Polysubstance Abuse, Bulimia, and Borderline Personality Disorder
536(3)
Case 9: A 12-Year-Old Boy with Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder
539(2)
Appendix B: Sample Group Protocols
541(4)
Homemaker's Management Group
541(1)
Family Recreation Skills
542(1)
Adolescent Cooking Group
542(1)
Dementia Cooking Group
543(2)
Index 545


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