9780199261970

Metaphysics A Guide and Anthology

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780199261970

  • ISBN10:

    0199261970

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2004-03-04
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press

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Summary

A complete and self-contained introduction to metaphysics, this anthology provides an extensive and varied collection of fifty-four of the best classical and contemporary readings on the subject. The readings are organized into ten sections: God, idealism and realism, being, universals and particulars, necessity and contingency, causation, space and time, identity, mind and body, and freewill and determinism. It features a substantial general introduction and detailed section introductions that set the selections in context and guide readers through them. Discussion questions and detailed guides to further reading are also included.

Author Biography


Tim Crane has taught philosophy at University College London since 1990. He took his PhD at the University of Cambridge in 1989. Katalin Farkas graduated in mathematics and philosophy from the Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, and she took her PhD in philosophy from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in 1998.

Table of Contents

God
Intorduction
Why Anything? Why This?
The five ways
Extract from Natural Theology
Extract from Proslogion
Extract from Monadology
Evil and omnipotence
Realism and Idealism Introduction
Selection from Essay Concerning Human Understanding
Selection from Three Dialogues
Selection from Critique of Pure Reason
Selection from Matter and Sense
Realism
Being Introduction
Selection from Categories
Selection from Essay Concerning Human Understanding
Primitive Thisness and Primitive Identity
On what there is
Selection from Material Beings
Can there be vague objects?
Vague Identity: Evans misunderstood
Universals and Particulars
Introduction
Selections from Republic and Parmenides
Selection from Universals: An Opinionated Introduction
Selection from New work for a theory of universals
On the Elements of Being: I
Causality and Properties
Necessity
Introduction
Selection from Naming and Necessity
Selection from On the Plurality of Worlds
Actualism and Possible Worlds
Selection from A Combinational Theory of Possibility
Causation
Introduction
Selection from Metaphysics
Selection from Enquiy Concerning Human Understanding
Causation
Causal Relations
Selections from The Faces of Causation
Time and Space Introduction
Selection from Physics
Selection from The Nature of Existence
Changes in Events and Changes in Things
Selection from Asymmetries in Time
Selection from The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence
The space-time world
The Paradoxes of Time Travel
Identity
Introduction
Identity through Time
Selection from On the Plurality of Worlds
Personal Identity
Persons, Animals, and Ourselves
Mind and Body
Introduction
Selection from Meditations on First Philosophy
Selection from New System of the Nature of Substances
Selections from Thought
Psychophysical and theoretical identifications
Selection from Thinking Causes
What is it like to be a bat?
Freedom and Determinism Introduction
Selection from Treatise of Human Nature
Freedom of the will and the concept of a person
The incompatibility of freewill and determinism
Freedom from Physics: Quantum Mechanics and Free Will
Human Freedom and the self
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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