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Microprocessor Architecture, Programming, and Applications with the 8085,9780130195708
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Microprocessor Architecture, Programming, and Applications with the 8085

by
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780130195708

ISBN10:
0130195707
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $143.60
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    Microprocessor Architecture, Programming, and Applications with the 8085




Summary

Created for one/two semester undergraduate level courses in Introduction to Microprocessors offered in electrical and computer technology departments and requires a prerequisite course in digital logic, but assumes no knowledge of programming. The first of its kind to offer an integrated treatment of both the hardware and software aspects of the microprocessor, this comprehensive and thoroughly updated text focuses on the 8085 microprocessor family to teach the basic concepts underlying programmable devices. Providing a sound pedagogy - from basic concepts to applications - it fully prepares students to apply concepts learned to other microprocessors in higher level courses or to a variety of situations they may encounter in their future jobs.

Table of Contents

PART I MICROPROCESSOR-BASED SYSTEMS: HARDWARE AND INTERFACING 1(172)
Microprocessors, Microcomputers, and Assembly Language
3(28)
Microprocessors
4(9)
Microprocessor Instruction Set and Computer Languages
13(7)
From Large Computers to Single Chip Microcontrollers
20(4)
Application: Microprocessor-Controlled Temperature System (MCTS)
24(7)
Introduction to 8085 Assembly Language Programming
31(26)
The 8085 Programming Model
32(2)
Instruction Classification
34(3)
Instruction, Data Format, and Storage
37(5)
How to Write, Assemble, and Execute a Simple Program
42(4)
Overview of the 8085 Instruction Set
46(4)
Writing and Hand Assembling a Program
50(7)
Microprocessor Architecture and Microcomputer Systems
57(38)
Microprocessor Architecture and Its Operations
58(5)
Memory
63(17)
Input and Output (I/O) Devices
80(1)
Example of a Microcomputer System
81(2)
Review: Logic Devices for Interfacing
83(7)
Microprocessor-Based System Application: MCTS
90(5)
8085 Microprocessor Architecture and Memory Interfacing
95(44)
The 8085 MPU
96(13)
Example of an 8085-Based Microcomputer
109(7)
Memory Interfacing
116(7)
Interfacing the 8155 Memory Segment
123(3)
Illustrative Example: Designing Memory for the MCTS Project
126(3)
Testing and Troubleshooting Memory Interfacing Circuits
129(3)
How Does an 8085-Based Single-Board Microcomputer Work?
132(7)
Interfacing I/O Devices
139(34)
Basic Interfacing Concepts
140(10)
Interfacing Output Displays
150(5)
Interfacing Input Devices
155(2)
Memory-Mapped I/O
157(6)
Testing and Troubleshooting I/O Interfacing Circuits
163(1)
Some Questions and Answers
164(9)
PART II PROGRAMMING THE 8085 173(198)
Introduction to 8085 Instructions
175(52)
Data Transfer (Copy) Operations
176
Arithmetic Operations
86(10)
Logic Operations
96(108)
Branch Operations
204(6)
Writing Assembly Language Programs
210(5)
Debugging a Program
215(1)
Some Puzzling Questions and Their Answers
215(12)
Programming Techniques with Additional Instructions
227(48)
Programming Techniques: Looping, Counting, and Indexing
228(4)
Additional Data Transfer and 16-Bit Arithmetic Instructions
232(9)
Arithmetic Operations Related to Memory
241(6)
Logic Operations: Rotate
247(7)
Logic Operations: Compare
254(7)
Dynamic Debugging
261(14)
Counters and Time Delays
275(20)
Counters and Time Delays
276(6)
Illustrative Program: Hexadecimal Counter
282(3)
Illustrative Program: Zero-to-Nine (Modulo Ten) Counter
285(3)
Illustrative Program: Generating Pulse Waveforms
288(2)
Debugging Counter and Time-Delay Programs
290(5)
Stack and Subroutines
295(28)
Stack
296(9)
Subroutine
305(10)
Restart, Conditional Call, and Return Instructions
315(1)
Advanced Subroutine Concepts
316(7)
Code Conversion, BCD Arithmetic, and 16-Bit Data Operations
323(28)
BCD-to-Binary Conversion
324(3)
Binary-to-BCD Conversion
327(2)
BCD-to-Seven-Segment-LED Code Conversion
329(3)
Binary-to-ASCII and ASCII-to-Binary Code Conversion
332(2)
BCD Addition
334(3)
BCD Subtraction
337(1)
Introduction to Advanced Instructions and Applications
338(4)
Multiplication
342(2)
Subtraction with Carry
344(7)
Software Development Systems and Assemblers
351(20)
Microprocessor-Based Software Development Systems
352(2)
Operating Systems and Programming Tools
354(5)
Assemblers and Cross-Assembers
359(4)
Writing Programs Using a Cross-Assembler
363(8)
PART III INTERFACING PERIPHERALS (I/Os) AND APPLICATIONS 371(266)
Interrupts
375(28)
The 8085 Interrupt
376(9)
8085 Vectored Interrupts
385(8)
Restart as Software Instructions
393(2)
Additional I/O Concepts and Processes
395(8)
Interfacing Data Converters
403(22)
Digital-to-Analog (D/A) Converters
404(10)
Analog-to-Digital (A/D) Converters
414(11)
Programmable Interface Devices: 8155 I/O and Timer; 8279 Keyboard/Display Interface
425(34)
Basic Concepts in Programmable Devices
426(6)
The 8155: Multipurpose Programmable Device
432(18)
The 8279 Programmable Keyboard/Display Interface
450(9)
General-Purpose Programmable Peripheral Devices
459(64)
The 8255A Programmable Peripheral Interface
460(19)
Illustration: Interfacing Keyboard and Seven-Segment Display
479(9)
Illustration: Bidirectional Data Transfer Between Two Microcomputers
488(6)
The 8254 (8253) Programmable Interval Timer
494(11)
The 8259 A Programmable Interrupt Controller
505(9)
Direct Memory Access (DMA) and the 8237 DMA Controller
514(9)
Serial I/O and Data Communication
523(40)
Basic Concepts in Serial I/O
524(10)
Software-Controlled Asynchronous Serial I/O
534(3)
The 8085---Serial I/O Lines: SOD and SID
537(3)
Hardware-Controlled Serial I/O Using Programmable Chips
540(23)
Microprocessor Applications
563(44)
Interfacing Scanned Multiplexed Displays and Liquid Crystal Displays
464(109)
Interfacing a Matrix Keyboard
573(8)
Memory Design
581(8)
MPU Design
589(3)
Designing a System: Single-Board Microcomputer
592(5)
Software Design
597(6)
Development and Troubleshooting Tools
603(4)
Extending 8-Bit Microprocessor Concepts to Higher-Level Processors and Microcontrollers
607(30)
8-Bit Microprocessors Contemporary to the 8085
608(3)
Review of Microprocessor Concepts
611(1)
16-Bit Microprocessors
612(14)
High-End-High-Performance Processors
626(7)
Single-Chip Microcontrollers
633(4)
Appendix A Number Systems 637(8)
Appendix B Introduction to the EMAC Primer 645(14)
Appendix C Pin Configuration of Selected Logic and Display Devices 659(10)
Appendix D Specifications: Data Converters and Peripheral Devices 669(66)
Appendix E American Standard Code for Information Interchange: ASCII Codes 735(2)
Appendix F 8085 Instruction Set 737(48)
Appendix G Solutions to Selected Questions, Problems, and Programming Assignments 785(16)
Appendix H Introduction to 8085 Assemblers and Simulators 801(14)
Index 815

Excerpts

This book was first published in 1984, and it has been in the field for the last eighteen years. The microprocessor concepts that were at the cutting edge of the technology in the 1970s and '80s have become fundamentals of the computer field. It is gratifying to see such acceptance of the integrated approach to teaching microprocessor concepts. The text is intended for introductory microprocessor courses at the undergraduate level in technology and engineering. It is a comprehensive treatment of the microprocessor, covering both hardware and software based on the 8085 microprocessor family. The text assumes a course in digital logic as a prerequisite; however, it does not assume any background in programming. At the outset, though; we need to answer the following three critical questions. 1. In the early years of the twenty-first century, is an 8-bit microprocessor an appropriate device through which to teach microprocessor concepts when 32- and 64-bit microprocessors are readily available?If we consider the worldwide sales volume of microprocessor chips, the answer is a resounding yes: 8-bit microprocessors (including single-chip microcontrollers) account for more than 90 percent of the total. The 8-bit microprocessor has already established its market in the areas of industrial control, such as machine control, process control, instrumentation, and consumer appliances; these systems that include a microprocessor are known as embedded systems or microprocessor-based products. The recent 32- and 64-bit microprocessors are used primarily in microcomputers and workstations; they are so powerful that their applications are better suited to such tasks as high-speed data processing, CAD/CAM, multitasking, and multiuser systems. The 32- or 64-bit microprocessors are less likely to replace 8-bit microprocessors in industrial control applications. From the teaching point of view, we are interested in teaching the basic concepts underlying a programmable device, such as buses, machine cycles, various processes of data flow (parallel, serial, interrupts, and DMA), internal register architecture, programming, and interfacing. A general-purpose 8-bit microprocessor is an ideal device to teach these concepts, especially in a rapidly changing technological environment. When students master the basic concepts, they will be able to apply those concepts in such an environment, whether it is based on a microcontroller, an 8-bit processor with a different set of instructions, or a 64-bit processor. 2. Why shouldn't we focus on the Intel high-end 32- or 64-bit processors when PCs (personal computers) are commonly available in college laboratories?This is similar to asking why shouldn't we use LSI devices to teach basic logic concepts of AND, NAND, and OR. To teach basic concepts, we need a simple processor with an adequate instruction set. The Intel high-end processors are too difficult to comprehend at the introductory level because of their complex architecture and large instruction set. They are suitable for high-level languages and handling large databases and graphics. These processors are used primarily in PCs and network servers. 3. Why teach the 8085 microprocessor?This question has several answers. One is that any 8-bit microprocessor that is commonly available will meet the teaching criteria, and another is that the 8085 is one of the most widely used microprocessors in college laboratories. It has simple architecture and an adequate instruction set that enable instructors to teach necessary programming concepts. It is inconsequential which microprocessor is selected as the focus; the concepts are easily transferable from one device to another. Having learned basic concepts with the 8085 microprocessor, students can adapt to the microcontroller environment (such as the Intel 8051 or Motorola 68HC 11) or to the PC environment. Furthermore, peripheral devices (such as th


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