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Mobilizing for Human Rights : International Law in Domestic Politics

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780521712323

ISBN10:
0521712327
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/31/2009
Publisher(s):
Cambridge University Press
List Price: $31.99

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Summary

This volume argues that international human rights law has made a positive contribution to the realization of human rights in much of the world. Although governments sometimes ratify human rights treaties, gambling that they will experience little pressure to comply with them, this is not typically the case. Focusing on rights stakeholders rather than the United Nations or state pressure, Beth Simmons demonstrates through a combination of statistical analyses and case studies that the ratification of treaties leads to better rights practices on average. Simmons argues that international human rights law should get more practical and rhetorical support from the international community as a supplement to broader efforts to address conflict, development, and democratization.

Table of Contents

Introduction
Why international law? The development of the international human rights regime in the twentieth century
Theories of commitment
Theories of compliance
Civil rights
Equality for women: education, work, and reproductive rights
Humane treatment: the prevalence and prevention of torture
The protection of innocents: rights of the child
Conclusions
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.


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