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Modern Database Management

by ; ;
Edition:
9th
ISBN13:

9780132212113

ISBN10:
0132212110
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2009
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 9th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2009.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.

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Summary

Modern Database Managementis the leading text in the business database market. It's noted for its focus on the latest principles, concepts and technologies and what leading practitioners say is most important for database developers.

Table of Contents

Preface xxiii
Part I The Context of Database Management
Part I Overview
2(1)
The Database Environment
3(82)
Learning Objectives
3(1)
Data Matters!
3(1)
Introduction
4(2)
Basic Concepts and Definitions
6(4)
Data
6(1)
Data Versus Information
6(1)
Metadata
7(1)
Database Management Systems
8(1)
Data Models
8(1)
Entities
9(1)
Relationships
10(1)
Relational Databases
10(1)
Traditional File Processing Systems
10(1)
File Processing Systems At Pine Valley Furniture Company
11(2)
Disadvantages of File Processing Systems
11(1)
Program-Data Dependence
12(1)
Duplication of Data
12(1)
Limited Data Sharing
12(1)
Lengthy Development Times
12(1)
Excessive Program Maintenance
12(1)
The Database Approach
13(1)
Advantages of The Database Approach
14(2)
Program-Data Independence
14(1)
Planned Data Redundancy
14(1)
Improved Data Consistency
14(1)
Improved Data Sharing
14(1)
Increased Productivity of Application Development
14(1)
Enforcement of Standards
15(1)
Improved Data Quality
15(1)
Improved Data Accessibility and Responsiveness
15(1)
Reduced Program Maintenance
15(1)
Improved Decision Support
16(1)
Cautions About Database Benefits
16(34)
Managing the People Involved in Database Development
50(2)
Three-Schema Architecture for Database Development
52(4)
Three-Schema Components
52(1)
Summary of Schemas
52(1)
Enterprise Data Model
52(2)
User Views
54(1)
Conceptual Schema
54(1)
Logical Schema
54(1)
Physical Schema
54(1)
Strategies for Development
54(2)
Three-Tiered Database Location Architecture
56(1)
Developing A Database Application For Pine Valley Furnitury Company
57(13)
Simplified Project Data Model Example
59(3)
A Current Pine Valley Furniture Company Project Request
62(1)
Matching User Needs to the Information Systems Architecture
62(3)
Analyzing Database Requirements
65(1)
Designing the Database
66(2)
Using the Database
68(2)
Administering the Database
70(1)
Summary
70(1)
Chapter Review
71(5)
Key Terms
71(1)
Review Questions
71(1)
Problems and Exercises
72(2)
Field Exercises
74(1)
References
74(1)
Further Reading
75(1)
Web Resources
75(1)
Case: Mountain View Community Hospital
76(8)
Part II Data Analysis
Part II Overview
84(1)
Modeling Data in the Organization
85(54)
Learning Objectives
85(1)
Introduction
85(2)
Modeling the Rules of the Organization
87(6)
Overview of Business Rules
87(1)
The Business Rules Paradigm
88(1)
Scope of Business Rules
88(1)
Good Business Rules
89(1)
Gathering Business Rules
89(1)
Data Names and Definitions
90(1)
Data Names
90(1)
Data Definitions
91(1)
Good Data Definitions
91(2)
The E-R Model: An Overview
93(3)
Sample E-R Diagram
93(2)
E-R Model Notation
95(1)
Modeling Entities and Attributes
96(10)
Entities
96(1)
Entity Type Versus Entity Instance
96(1)
Entily Type Versus System Input, Output, or User
96(1)
Strong Versus Weak Entity Types
97(1)
Naming and Defining Entity Types
98(2)
Attributes
100(1)
Required Versus Optional Attributes
100(1)
Simple Versus Composite Attributes
101(1)
Single-Valued Versus Multivalued Attributes
102(1)
Stored Versus Derived Attributes
102(1)
Identifier Attribute
103(1)
Naming and Defining Attributes
104(2)
Modeling Relationships
106(17)
Basic Concepts and Definitions in Relationships
107(1)
Attributes on Relationships
107(1)
Associative Entities
107(2)
Degree of a Relationship
109(1)
Unary Relationship
109(3)
Binary Relationship
112(1)
Ternary Relationship
112(1)
Attributes or Entity?
113(2)
Cardinality Constraints
115(1)
Minimum Cardinality
115(1)
Maximum Cardinality
115(1)
Some Examples
116(1)
A Ternary Relationship
117(1)
Modeling Time-Dependent Data
117(3)
Multiple Relationships
120(1)
Naming and Defining Relationships
121(2)
E-R Modeling Example: Pine Valley Furniture Company
123(2)
Database Processing At Pink Valley Furniture
125(3)
Showing Product Information
125(1)
Showing Customer Information
126(1)
Showing Customer Order Status
126(1)
Showing Product Sales
127(1)
Summary
128(1)
Chapter Review
129(8)
Key Terms
129(1)
Review Questions
129(2)
Problems and Exercises
131(4)
Field Exercises
135(1)
References
136(1)
Further Reading
136(1)
Web Resources
136(1)
Case: Mountain View Community Hospital
137(2)
The Enhanced E-R Model and Business Rules
139(48)
Learning Objectives
139(1)
Introduction
139(1)
Representing Supertypes and Subtypes
140(7)
Basic Concepts and Notation
141(2)
An Example
143(1)
Attribute Inheritance
144(1)
When to Use Supcrtype/Subtype Relationships
144(1)
Representing Specialization and Generalization
145(1)
Generalization
145(1)
Specialization
146(1)
Combining Specialization and Generalization
146(1)
Specifying Constraints in Supertype/Subtype Relationships
147(6)
Specifying Completeness Constraints
147(1)
Total Specialization Rule
148(1)
Partial Specialization Rule
149(1)
Specifying Disjointness Constraints
149(1)
Disjoint Rule
150(1)
Overlap Rule
150(1)
Defining Subtype Discriminators
150(1)
Disjoint Subtypes
150(1)
Overlapping Subtypes
151(1)
Defining Supertype/Subtype Hierarchies
152(1)
An Example
152(1)
Summary of Supertype/Subtype Hierarchies
153(1)
EER Modling Example: Pine Valley Furniture
153(4)
Entity Clustering
157(3)
Packaged Data Models
160(6)
Business Rules Revisited
166(8)
Classification of Business Rules
166(2)
Stating a Structural Assertion
168(1)
Derived Facts
169(1)
Stating an Action Assertion
169(1)
Types of Action Assertions
170(1)
Representing and Enforcing Business Rules
170(1)
Sample Business Rules
171(1)
Identifying and Testing Business Rules
172(2)
Summary
174(1)
Chapter Review
175(6)
Key Terms
175(1)
Review Questions
175(1)
Problems and Exercises
176(3)
Field Exercises
179(1)
References
179(1)
Further Reading
180(1)
Web Resources
180(1)
Case: Mountain View Community Hospital
181(5)
Part III Database Design
Part III Overview
186(1)
Logical Database Design and the Relational Model
187(53)
Learning Objectives
187(1)
Introduction
187(1)
The Relational Data Model
188(5)
Basic Definitions
188(1)
Relational Data Structure
189(1)
Relational Keys
189(1)
Properties of Relations
190(1)
Removing Multivalued Attributes from Tables
190(1)
Example Database
191(2)
Integrity Constraints
193(4)
Domain Constraints
193(1)
Entity Integrity
193(1)
Referential Integrity
194(1)
Action Assertions
195(1)
Creating Relational Tables
195(1)
Well-Structured Relations
196(1)
Transforming EER Diagrams into Relations
197(14)
Step 1: Map Regular Entities
198(1)
Composite Attributes
198(1)
Multivalued Attributes
199(1)
Step 2: Map Weak Entities
200(1)
Step 3: Map Binary Relationships
201(1)
Map Binary One-to-Many Relationships
201(1)
Map Binary Many-to-Many Relationships
202(1)
Map Binary One-to-One Relationships
202(1)
Step 4: Map Associative Entities
203(1)
Identifier Not Assigned
204(1)
Identifier Assigned
204(1)
Step 5: Map Unary Relationships
205(1)
Unary One-to-Many Relationships
205(1)
Unary Many-to-Many Relationships
206(1)
Step 6: Map Ternary (and n-ary) Relationships
207(1)
Step 7: Map Supertype/Subtype Relationships
208(2)
Summary of EER to Relational Transformations
210(1)
Introduction to Normalization
211(3)
Steps in Normalization
211(1)
Functional Dependencies and Keys
212(1)
Determinants
213(1)
Candidate Keys
213(1)
Normalization Example: Pine Valley Furniture Company
214(6)
Step 0: Represent the View in Tabular Form
214(1)
Step 1: Convert to First Normal Form
214(1)
Remove Repeating Groups
215(1)
Select the Primary Key
215(2)
Anomalies in INF
217(1)
Step 2: Convert to Second Normal Form
217(1)
Step 3: Convert to Third Normal Form
218(1)
Removing Transitive Dependencies
218(2)
Determinants and Normalization
220(1)
Step 4: Further Normalization
220(1)
Merging Relations
220(3)
An Example
221(1)
View Integration Problems
221(1)
Synonyms
221(1)
Homonyms
222(1)
Transitive Dependencies
222(1)
Supertype/Subtype Relationships
222(1)
A Final Step for Defining Relational Keys
223(2)
Summary
225(1)
Chapter Review
226(9)
Key Terms
226(1)
Review Questions
226(1)
Problems and Exercises
227(6)
Field Exercises
233(1)
References
234(1)
Further Reading
234(1)
Web Resources
234(1)
Case: Mountain View Community Hospital
235(5)
Physical Database Design and Performance
240(49)
Learning Objectives
240(1)
Introduction
240(1)
Physical Database Design Process
241(3)
Data Volume and Usage Analysis
242(2)
Designing Fields
244(4)
Choosing Data Types
244(1)
Coding and Compression Techniques
245(1)
Controlling Data Integrity-A Foundation for Sarbanes-Oxley Compliance
246(1)
Handling Missing Data
247(1)
Designing Physical Records and Denormalization
248(6)
Denormalization
248(1)
Denormalize with Caution
249(1)
Opportunities and Types of Denormalization
249(5)
Designing Physical Files
254(11)
Pointer
256(1)
File Organizations
256(1)
Sequential File Organizations
256(1)
Indexed File Organizations
256(6)
Hashed File Organizations
262(1)
Summary of File Organizations
263(1)
Clustering Files
263(2)
Designing Controls for Files
265(1)
Using and Selecting Indexes
265(2)
Creating a Unique Key Index
265(1)
Creating a Secondary (Nonunique) Key Index
266(1)
When to Use Indexes
266(1)
RAID: Improving File Access Performance by Parallel Processing
267(3)
Designing Databases
270(3)
Optimizing for Query Performance
273(5)
Parallel Query Processing
273(1)
Overriding Automatic Query Optimization
274(1)
Picking Data Block Size
275(1)
Balancing I/O Across Disk Controllers
275(1)
Guidelines for Batter Query Design
276(2)
Summary
278(1)
Chapter Review
279(5)
Key Terms
279(1)
Review Questions
279(1)
Problems and Exercises
280(2)
Field Exercises
282(1)
References
283(1)
Further Reading
283(1)
Web Resources
283(1)
Case: Mountain View Community Hospital
284(4)
Part IV Implementation
Part IV Overview
288(1)
Introduction to SQL
289(44)
Learning Objectives
289(1)
Introduction
289(2)
History of the SQL Standard
291(1)
The Role of SQL in a Database Architecture
292(1)
The SQL Environment
293(5)
Defining a Database in SQL
298(6)
Generating SQL Database Definitions
298(1)
Creating Tables
299(3)
Creating Data Integrity Controls
302(1)
Changing Table Definitions
302(2)
Removing Tables
304(1)
Inserting, Updating, and Deleting Data
304(3)
Batch Input
305(1)
Deleting Database Contents
306(1)
Updating Database Contents
306(1)
Internal Schema Definition in RDBMSs
307(1)
Creating Indexes
307(1)
Processing Single Tables
308(18)
Clauses of the SELECT Statement
309(1)
Using Expressions
310(1)
Using Functions
311(1)
Using Wildcards
312(1)
Using Comparison Operators
313(1)
Using Boolean Operators
313(3)
Using Ranges for Qualification
316(1)
Using Distinct Values
317(1)
Using IN and NOT IN with Lists
318(1)
Sorting Results: The ORDER BY Clause
319(1)
Categorizing Results: The GROUP BY Clause
320(1)
Qualifying Results by Categories: The HAVING Clause
321(1)
Using and Defining Views
322(4)
Materialized Views
326(1)
Summary
326(1)
Chapter Review
327(5)
Key Terms
327(1)
Review Questions
327(1)
Problems and Exercises
328(2)
Field Exercises
330(1)
References
330(1)
Further Reading
331(1)
Web Resources
331(1)
Case: Mountain View Community Hospital
332(1)
Advanced SQL
333(35)
Learning Objectives
333(1)
Introduction
333(1)
Processing Multiple Tables
334(15)
Equi-Join
335(1)
Natural Join
336(1)
Outer Join
337(2)
Union Join
339(1)
Sample Multiple Join Involving Four Tables
339(1)
Subqueries
340(3)
Correlated Subqueries
343(2)
Using Derived Tables
345(1)
Combining Queries
346(1)
Conditional Expressions
347(1)
More Complicated SQL Queries
348(1)
Ensuring Transaction Integrity
349(1)
Data Dictionary Facilities
350(2)
SQL:2003 Enhancements and Extensions to SQL
352(4)
Analytical Functions
352(2)
New Data Types
354(1)
Other Enhancements
354(1)
Programming Extensions
355(1)
Triggers and Routines
356(4)
Triggers
357(1)
Routines
358(2)
Embedded SQL and Dynamic SQL
360(2)
Summary
362(1)
Chapter Review
363(4)
Key Terms
363(1)
Review Questions
363(1)
Problems and Exercises
364(1)
Field Exercises
364(1)
References
365(1)
Further Reading
366(1)
Web Resources
366(1)
Case: Mountain View Community Hospital
367(1)
The Client/Server Database Environment
368(24)
Learning Objectives
368(1)
Location, Location, Location!
368(1)
Introduction
369(1)
Client/Server Architectures
370(4)
File Server Architectures
371(1)
Limitations of File Servers
372(1)
Database Server Architectures
372(2)
Three-Tier Architectures
374(2)
Partitioning an Application
376(2)
Role of the Mainframe
378(1)
Using Middleware
379(3)
Client/Server Issues
382(1)
Using ODBC to Link External Tables Stored on a Database Server
383(2)
Using JDBC to Link External Tables Stored on a Database Server
385(1)
Looking Forward with Client/Server in Mind
386(1)
Summary
386(1)
Chapter Review
387(3)
Key Terms
387(1)
Review Questions
387(1)
Problems and Exercises
388(1)
Field Exercises
388(1)
References
389(1)
Further Reading
389(1)
Web Resources
389(1)
Case: Mountain View Community Hospital
390(2)
The Internet Database Environment
392(28)
Learning Objectives
392(1)
Introduction
392(1)
The Internet and Database Connection
393(1)
The Internet Environment
394(2)
Common Internet Architecture Components
396(7)
Internet-Related Languages
396(1)
XML Overview
397(2)
Server-Side Extensions
399(1)
Web Server Interfaces
400(1)
Web Servers
401(1)
Client-Side Extensions
402(1)
Web-to-Database Tools
403(11)
Web Services
405(6)
Lack of Mature Standards
411(1)
Lack of Security
412(1)
Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA)
412(1)
Semantic Web
413(1)
Internet Technology Rate-of-Change Issues
413(1)
Summary
414(1)
Chapter Review
415(3)
Key Terms
415(1)
Review Questions
415(1)
Problems and Exercises
416(1)
Field Exercises
416(1)
References
416(1)
Further Reading
417(1)
Web Resources
417(1)
Case: Mountain View Community Hospital
418(2)
Data Warehousing
420(63)
Learning Objectives
420(1)
Introduction
420(2)
Basic Concepts of Data Warehousing
422(6)
A Brief History
423(1)
The Need for Data Warehousing
423(1)
Need for a Companywide View
423(3)
Need to Separate Operational and Informational Systems
426(1)
Data Warehousing Success
426(2)
Data Warehouse Architectures
428(9)
Generic Two-Level Architecture
428(1)
Independent Data Mart Data Warehousing Environment
429(1)
Dependent Data Mart and Operational Data Store Architecture: A Three-Level Approach
430(2)
Logical Data Mart and Real-Time Data Warehouse Archilecture
432(3)
Three-Layer Data Architecture
435(1)
Role of the Enterprise Data Model
435(1)
Role of Metadata
436(1)
Some Characteristics of Data Warehouse Data
437(4)
Status Versus Event Data
437(1)
Transient Versus Periodic Data
438(1)
An Example of Transient and Periodic Data
438(1)
Transient Data
438(1)
Periodic Data
439(1)
Other Data Warehouse Changes
440(1)
The Reconciled Data Layer
441(6)
Characteristics of Data after ETL
441(1)
The ETL Process
442(1)
Extract
442(2)
Cleanse
444(2)
Load and Index
446(1)
Data Transformation
447(5)
Data Transformation Functions
448(1)
Record-Level Functions
448(1)
Field-Level Functions
449(2)
More Complex Transformations
451(1)
Tools to Support Data Reconciliation
451(1)
Data Quality Tools
451(1)
Data Conversion Tools
452(1)
Data Cleansing Tools
452(1)
Selecting Tools
452(1)
The Derived Data Layer
452(13)
Characteristics of Derived Data
452(1)
The Star Schema
453(1)
Fact Tables and Dimension Tables
453(1)
Example Star Schema
454(1)
Surrogate Key
455(1)
Grain of Fact Table
456(1)
Duration of the Database
456(1)
Size of the Fact Table
457(1)
Modeling Date and Time
458(1)
Variations of the Star Schema
458(1)
Multiple Fact Tables
458(1)
Factless Fact Tables
459(1)
Normalizing Dimension Tables
460(1)
Multivalued Dimensions
461(1)
Hierarchies
461(3)
Slowly Changing Dimensions
464(1)
The User Interface
465(5)
Role of Metadata
466(1)
Querying Tools
466(1)
Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) Tools
467(1)
Slicing a Cube
468(1)
Drill-Down
468(1)
Data Mining Tools
469(1)
Data Mining Techniques
469(1)
Data Mining Applications
469(1)
Data Visualization
470(1)
Summary
470(1)
Chapter Review
471(7)
Key Terms
471(1)
Review Questions
472(1)
Problems and Exercises
473(3)
Field Exercises
476(1)
References
476(1)
Further Reading
477(1)
Web Resources
477(1)
Case: Mountain View Community Hospital
478(4)
Part V Advanced Database Topics
Part V Overview
482(1)
Data and Database Administration
483(61)
Learning Objectives
483(1)
Introduction
483(2)
The Roles of Data and Database Administrators
485(7)
Traditional Data Administration
485(2)
Traditional Database Administration
487(1)
Evolving Approaches to Data Administration
488(1)
Blending Data and Database Administration
488(2)
Fast-Track Development
490(1)
New DBA Roles
490(2)
Summary
492(1)
The Open-Source Movement
492(2)
Modeling Enterprise Data
494(1)
Organizational Roles
494(1)
Role of an Information Systems Architecture
494(1)
Managing Data Security
495(15)
Threats to Data Security
495(2)
Establishing Client/Server Security
497(1)
Server Security
497(1)
Network Security
497(1)
Client/Server Security Issues for Web-Enabled Databases
498(1)
Web Security
498(1)
Web Privacy
499(1)
Database Software Data Security Features
500(1)
Views
501(1)
Integrity Controls
502(1)
Authorization Rules
503(2)
User-Defined Procedures
505(1)
Encryption
505(1)
Authentication Schemes
506(1)
Passwords
506(1)
Strong Authentication
507(1)
Mediated Authentication
508(1)
Security Policies and Procedures
508(1)
Personnel Controls
508(1)
Physical Access Controls
509(1)
Maintenance Controls
509(1)
Data Privacy Controls
509(1)
Database Backup and Recovery
510(7)
Basic Recovery Facilities
510(1)
Back-up Facilities
510(1)
Journalizing Facilities
511(1)
Checkpoint Facility
511(1)
Recovery Manager
512(1)
Recovery and Restart Procedures
512(1)
Disk Mirroring
512(1)
Restore/Rerun
512(1)
Maintaining Transaction Integrity
512(2)
Backward Recovery
514(1)
Forward Recovery
514(1)
Types of Database Failure
515(1)
Aborted Transactions
515(1)
Incorrect Data
516(1)
System Failure
516(1)
Database Destruction
517(1)
Disaster Recovery
517(1)
Controlling Concurrent Access
517(6)
The Problem of Lost Updates
518(1)
Serializability
519(1)
Locking Mechanisms
519(1)
Locking Level
520(1)
Types of Locks
520(1)
Deadlock
521(1)
Managing Deadlock
522(1)
Versioning
522(1)
Managing Data Quality
523(4)
The State of Data Quality
524(1)
External Data Sources
524(1)
Redundant Data Storage
525(1)
Lack of Organizational Commitment
525(1)
Data Quality Improvement
525(1)
Conduct a Data Quality Audit
525(1)
Establish a Data Stewardship Program
525(1)
Apply TQM Principles and Practices
526(1)
Overcome Organizational Barriers
526(1)
Apply Modern Data Management Technology
526(1)
Estimate Return on Investment
526(1)
Data Dictionaries and Repositories
527(2)
Data Dictionary
527(1)
Repositories
528(1)
Overview of Tuning the Database for Performance
529(4)
Installation of the DBMS
530(1)
Memory and Storage Space Usage
530(1)
Input/Output (I/O) Contention
531(1)
CPU Usage
531(1)
Application Tuning
532(1)
Data Availability
533(2)
Costs of Downtime
533(1)
Measures to Ensure Availability
534(1)
Hardware Failures
534(1)
Loss or Corruption of Data
534(1)
Maintenance Downtime
534(1)
Network-Related Problems
534(1)
Summary
535(1)
Chapter Review
535(7)
Key Terms
535(1)
Review Questions
536(1)
Problems and Exercises
537(2)
Field Exercises
539(1)
References
540(1)
Further Reading
540(1)
Web Resources
541(1)
Case: Mountain View Community Hospital
542(2)
Overview: Distributed Databases
544(4)
Learning Objectives
544(1)
Overview
544(3)
Objectives and Trade-Offs
545(1)
Options for Distributing a Database
545(1)
Distributed DBMS
546(1)
Query Optimization
547(1)
Chapter Review
547(1)
References
547(1)
Further Reading
547(1)
Web Resources
547(1)
Overview: Object-Oriented Data Modeling
548(8)
Learning Objectives
548(1)
Overview
548(7)
The Unified Modeling Language
549(1)
Object-Oriented Data Modeling
549(5)
Representing Aggregation
554(1)
Chapter Review
555(1)
References
555(1)
Further Reading
555(1)
Web Resources
555(1)
Overview: Object-Oriented Database Development
556(6)
Learning Objectives
556(1)
Overview
556(5)
Object Definition Language
557(2)
Creating Object Instances
559(1)
Object Query Language
560(1)
Chapter Review
561(1)
References
561(1)
Further Reading
561(1)
Web Resources
561(1)
Appendix A Data Modeling Tools and Notation
562(10)
Comparing E-R Modeling Conventions
562(9)
Visio Professional 2003 Notation
562(3)
Entities
565(1)
Relationships
565(1)
AllFusion ERwin Data Modeler 4.1 SP1 Notation
565(1)
Entities
565(1)
Relationships
565(3)
Sybase Power Designer 11.1 Notation
568(1)
Entities
569(1)
Relationships
569(1)
Oracle Designer Notation
569(1)
Entities
569(1)
Relationships
569(2)
Comparison of Tool Interfaces and E-R Diagrams
571(1)
Appendix B Advanced Normal Forms
572(6)
Boyce-Codd Normal Form
572(2)
Anomalies in STUDENT_ADVISOR
573(1)
Definition of Boyce-Codd Normal Form (BCNF)
573(1)
Converting a Relation to BCNF
573(1)
Fourth Normal Form
574(2)
Multivalued Dependencies
576(1)
Higher Normal Forms
576(1)
Appendix Review
577(1)
Key Terms
577(1)
References
577(1)
Web Resources
577(1)
Appendix C Data Structures
578(13)
Pointers
578(1)
Data Structure Building Blocks
579(2)
Linear Data Structures
581(5)
Stacks
582(1)
Queues
583(1)
Sorted Lists
583(2)
Multilists
585(1)
Hazards of Chain Structures
586(1)
Trees
587(3)
Balanced Trees
587(3)
References
590(1)
Appendix D Object-Relational Databases
591(6)
Basic Concepts and Definitions
591(2)
Features of an ORDBMS
592(1)
Complex Data Types
592(1)
Enhanced SQL
593(2)
A Simple Example
594(1)
Content Addressing
594(1)
Advantages of the Object-Relational Approach
595(1)
ORDBMS Vendors and Products
595(1)
Appendix Review
596(1)
Key Terms
596(1)
References
596(1)
Web Resources
596(1)
Glossary of Acronyms 597(3)
Glossary of Terms 600(9)
Index 609


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