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Modern Radio Production : Product, Programming, Performance,9780495050315
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Modern Radio Production : Product, Programming, Performance

by ; ; ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780495050315

ISBN10:
0495050318
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/3/2006
Publisher(s):
Thomson-Wadsworth
List Price: $209.66

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This is the 7th edition with a publication date of 8/3/2006.
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Summary

Preface. Foreword. Part One: THE TOOLS. 1. Production in Modern Radio. 2. The Console. 3. CD Players, Recordable CDs and Turntables. 4. Recording and Playback Devices. 5. Microphones and Sound. Part Two: THE TECHNIQUES. 6. Electronic and Physical Editing. 7. Recorded Program Production. 8. Live, On-Air Production. 9. More About the Computer in Radio Production. Part Three: THE APPLICATIONS. 10. Achieving an Effect. 11. Drama and Dramatic Elements in Radio Production. 12. Commercial Production. 13. Radio Production for News and Public Affairs. 14. Remote and Sports Production. 15. Advanced Radio Production. 16. Production, Programming, and the Modern Format. Appendix A: Another Time: A Play by Richard Wilson. Appendix B: A Capsule History of Radio: Past Meets Future for the Modern.

Table of Contents

Preface xix
Foreword xxii
PART ONE THE TOOLS
1(125)
Production in Modern Radio
1(19)
Radio Retro: Radio Captures Listeners---and Imaginations
2(2)
Sound of the Station
4(1)
Formats
4(1)
Reaching a Specific Audience
4(1)
How Target Audiences Affect Format
5(1)
How Formats Are Constructed
6(1)
Networks
7(1)
Other Programming Developments in Radio
7(1)
Satellite Radio Comes of Age
8(2)
Tuning into Technology: Web Radio
10(2)
Noncommercial Radio
12(1)
Economics of Radio
12(2)
The Role of the Producer in Modern Radio
14(2)
Summary
16(1)
You're On! The Role of the Announcer in Modern Radio
17(3)
The Console
20(28)
Function of the Console
20(1)
Amplification
21(1)
Routing
21(1)
Mixing
21(1)
Understanding Console Function: Some Hypothetical Examples
21(11)
Hypothetical Console A
22(3)
Hypothetical Console B
25(3)
Hypothetical Console C
28(4)
Radio Retro: Potting Down on the Old Pot
32(1)
Hypothetical Console D
32(1)
Summary of the Hypothetical Consoles
33(1)
Understanding Console Functions: Actual Consoles
33(4)
Analog Consoles
34(2)
Digital Consoles
36(1)
Operation of the Console
37(6)
Mix-Minus
37(1)
The Virtual Console
38(2)
Submixing
40(1)
Patching
41(2)
A Final Look at Two Broadcast Consoles
43(1)
Summary
43(5)
Applications
45(1)
Exercises
46(2)
CD Players, Recordable CDs, and Turntables
48(16)
Compact Discs
49(3)
Recordable CDs
52(3)
Audio CDs, WAV Files, and MP3s
53(2)
CD Players
55(2)
Super Audio CDs and Audio DVDs: The Wave of the Future?
56(1)
Structure of the Turntable
57(2)
Parts of the Turntable
57(1)
The Drive Mechanism
57(1)
The Tonearm
57(2)
Radio Retro: Turntables
59(2)
The Disc
61(1)
Summary
62(2)
Applications
62(1)
Exercises
63(1)
Recording and Playback Devices
64(30)
Sampling
65(3)
Magnetic Tape
68(8)
Digital Audiotape
69(2)
Workings of the Digital Tape Machine
71(1)
R-DAT Tape Heads and Controls
71(2)
Tape Machine Controls and Indicators
73(2)
Cueing a Tape
75(1)
DAT Playback
75(1)
Disk Drive Recording
76(2)
Digital Audio Workstations
77(1)
Enter MiniDiscs
78(2)
The Digital Cart Machine
80(1)
Analog Tape Machines
80(3)
The Heads
82(1)
Tuning into Technology: Digital Sound and Audio Compression
83(4)
The Tape Transport Mechanism
84(2)
Tape Machine Controls and Indicators
86(1)
Cueing a Tape
87(1)
Heads and Tracks
87(1)
How Tracks Work
88(1)
Cassette Machines
88(1)
Cartridge Machines
89(2)
Bulk Eraser
91(1)
Summary
91(3)
Applications
93(1)
Exercises
93(1)
Microphones and Sound
94(32)
The Basics of Sound
94(6)
The Elements of Sound
95(3)
The Nature of Sound: Frequency
98(1)
The Nature of Sound: Amplitude
98(2)
Tuning into Technology: The Shape of Sound
100(3)
Other Characteristics of Sound
102(1)
Summary of the Basics of Sound
103(1)
The Microphone: How it Works
103(3)
Electronics of the Microphone
103(1)
Pickup (Polar) Patterns of the Microphone
104(2)
Radio Retro: The King of Microphones
106(7)
Frequency Response of Microphones
108(5)
Review of Microphone Workings
113(1)
Physical Types of Microphones
113(3)
Hand Held
113(1)
Studio, Mounted
114(1)
Headset
114(1)
Lavalier
114(1)
Shotgun
114(2)
Review of the Physical Types
116(1)
Microphone Selection and Use
116(6)
Selection by Mic Type
116(1)
Selection by Pickup Pattern
117(1)
Selection by Element
117(1)
Selection by Frequency Response
117(1)
Selection by Personality
118(1)
Adding Up Selection Factors
119(1)
Notes on Microphone Use
119(3)
Summary
122(3)
Applications
123(1)
Exercises
123(2)
You're On! Microphone Technique for Announcers
125(1)
PART TWO THE TECHNIQUES
126(84)
Electronic Editing
126(18)
The Basics of Editing Audio
127(8)
Looking at the Waveform
128(1)
Splicing and Editing a Sound File
128(2)
Marking the Edit Points
130(1)
Nondestructive Editing
131(4)
Copying, Pasting, and Looping
135(2)
Editing with a MiniDisc
137(3)
Dubbing
140(1)
Advantages of Dubbing
141(1)
Review of Dubbing
141(1)
Summary
141(3)
Applications
141(1)
Exercises
142(2)
Recorded Program Production
144(22)
Recorded versus Live, On-Air Production
144(1)
Complexity
144(1)
Scheduled Airtime
145(1)
Convenience
145(1)
Layout of a Production Studio
145(3)
Equipment in the Production Studio
146(2)
Sound Treatment in the Production Studio
148(1)
Working in a Production Studio
148(2)
Radio Retro: The Development of Audio Tape, or How to Spend More Time on the Golf Course
150(1)
Music
151(4)
Sources of Music
151(1)
Choosing Music for Production Work
152(1)
Styles of Music
153(2)
Recorded Voice
155(6)
Miking Multiple Speakers
156(3)
Communicating with Speakers
159(2)
Sound Effects
161(1)
Combining Elements in Production
161(1)
Industry Update: The Ultimate Radio Recording Studio
162(1)
Summary
163(3)
Applications
164(1)
Exercises
164(2)
Live, On-Air Production
166(20)
Typical Airshift
167(3)
Duties of the On-Air Producer
167(3)
Typical Schedule
170(1)
Sound of the Station
170(3)
Pace
170(2)
Content
172(1)
Announcing Style
172(1)
Radio Retro: Hello Everybody in Radioland, This is Your Announcer Speaking
173(1)
Blending the Sound Sources
174(1)
Suggestions for Live, On-Air Production
174(1)
Console Operation
174(1)
Establishing a Routine
174(1)
Industry Update: What to Do . . . But More Importantly, What Not To
175(3)
Planning in Advance
176(1)
Being Aware of False Endings
176(1)
Listening to the Air Monitor
177(1)
Clearing Equipment
177(1)
Planning for the Worst
177(1)
Working with Satellite Services
178(3)
The Satellite Feed
178(1)
Programming from Satellite
179(1)
How to Use Service Material
179(2)
Summary
181(1)
You're On! Ad-libbing
182(4)
Applications
184(1)
Exercises
185(1)
More About the Computer in Radio Production
186(24)
Computer Basics
186(2)
Computer-Generated Effects
188(2)
Computer-Assisted Editing
190(1)
Industry Update: SmartSound and GarageBand
191(7)
Computers in Automation and Satellite Services
198(2)
Radio Retro: Early Automation---Radio in a Can
200(5)
Computers in the Programming Function
205(1)
Digital Audio Broadcasting
206(1)
Summary
207(3)
Applications
208(1)
Exercises
208(2)
PART THREE THE APPLICATIONS
210(167)
Achieving an Effect
210(18)
What Is an Effect?
210(1)
Kinds of Effects
211(1)
How Production Elements Support a Theme
211(2)
Creating Excitement
212(1)
Creating Immediate Identification
212(1)
Evoking an Emotion
213(1)
Summary of Effects
213(1)
How a Producer Uses Production Elements
213(6)
Music
214(1)
Sound Effects
215(1)
Coloration of Sound
216(1)
Timing and Pace
217(1)
Voice Quality
218(1)
Industry Update: Achieving an Effect and the Bottom Line: Production Promotion
219(3)
The Sound of Words
221(1)
Copywriting
221(1)
Using Elements of Sound to Achieve an Effect
222(1)
Recording a Voice
222(3)
Recording Music
222(3)
Summary
225(3)
Applications
225(1)
Exercises
226(2)
Drama and Dramatic Elements in Radio Production
228(11)
The Structure of Drama
228(2)
Action
229(1)
Dialogue
229(1)
Plot
229(1)
Beginning, Middle, and End
229(1)
Conflict
229(1)
Suspense
229(1)
Exposition
230(1)
Dramatic Elements in Commercial Production
230(2)
Capturing Attention
230(1)
Compressing Time
231(1)
Dramatic Elements in News Production
232(1)
Technical Considerations of Radio Drama
232(4)
Giving the Illusion of Place
233(1)
Giving the Illusion of Movement
234(1)
Making the Background a Fabric of Believability
234(1)
Mic Techniques to Achieve Illusions of Place and Movement
234(1)
Sound Design
235(1)
Summary
236(3)
Applications
237(1)
Exercise
238(1)
Commercial Production
239(23)
What Makes a Commercial Effective?
240(1)
Elements of Effective Radio Advertising
241(4)
A Shoe Store Advertisement
242(1)
A Car Dealership Advertisement
242(2)
A Humorous Pizza Commercial
244(1)
Practical Approaches to Radio Commercials
245(3)
Radio Retro: You Can't Sell That on the Air
248(4)
Execution of Radio Commercials
249(3)
Industry Update: Technology Makes Big-Time Sound Available to Small Production Agencies
252(1)
Suggestions for Producing Effective Commercials
253(1)
Know Your Audience
254(2)
Avoid Gimmicks
254(1)
Summarize the Thrust
254(1)
Don't Blast the Listener
254(1)
Read the Spot to the Client, or Better Yet, Play a Good Demo
254(1)
Don't Force Humor
255(1)
Achieve High Technical Quality
255(1)
Don't Overuse a Particular Piece of Music
255(1)
Keep the Message Simple
255(1)
Avoid These Five Common Mistakes in Commercials
256(1)
Production Applications in Station Promotion
256(2)
Summary
258(2)
Applications
258(1)
Exercises
259(1)
You're On! How Announcers Can Read to Time
260(2)
News Production
262(46)
News Gathering
263(1)
News Writing
264(1)
News Assembly
265(1)
Choosing Stories and Story Order
265(1)
Choosing Sound Elements
265(1)
A Quick Primer on Radio News Writing
266(15)
Script Convensions for Radio
267(1)
Paper and Print
267(2)
The Header
269(1)
The Story
270(1)
Tape Cues
270(2)
Story Tags
272(2)
Lead-in to Voice Reports
274(2)
Punctuation
276(2)
Words
278(1)
Jargon and Technical Words
278(1)
Active versus Passive
278(1)
``Says'' and the Use of Present Tense
279(1)
Numbers and Abbreviations
280(1)
Numbers
280(1)
Symbols and Abbreviations
280(1)
Names
281(1)
News Reading and Reporting
281(1)
News and Public-Affairs Programming
282(1)
Newscasts
282(6)
Exclusively Local News
283(1)
Local News with Wire Copy
283(4)
News with Wire Copy and Network Audio
287(1)
Talk Shows
288(1)
Special Events
288(1)
Production Techniques for News and Public Affairs
289(5)
Interviewing
289(1)
Story and Actuality Editing
290(1)
Using Sound Sources in Radio News Production
290(1)
Using the Telephone to Maximum Benefit
290(1)
Using Modern News-Gathering Technology
291(1)
Making the Newscast a Cohesive, Unified Whole
292(2)
Summary
294(1)
Applications
294(1)
You're On! Techniques for Effective On-Air Performance
295(13)
Exercises
307(1)
Remote and Sports Production
308(19)
Remote Radio Equipment
309(3)
Telephone Lines
309(2)
Other Equipment for a Remote
311(1)
Tuning Into Technology: Getting the Signal from Here to There
312(5)
Planning the Remote
317(2)
Signing Contracts
318(1)
Preparing the Site
318(1)
Preparing the Equipment
318(1)
Preparing a Communication System
319(1)
The Sports Remote
319(3)
Baseball
320(1)
Hockey
321(1)
Football
321(1)
Basketball
321(1)
Radio Retro: Calling the Game You Don't Really See
322(2)
Field Sports
323(1)
A Final Note
324(1)
Summary
324(3)
Applications
325(1)
Exercises
325(2)
Advanced Radio Production
327(24)
Multichannel Recording
327(7)
Input Modules
330(2)
Output Buses
332(1)
Monitor Controls
332(1)
A Further Note about Multichannel Consoles
332(1)
Role of Multichannel Recording
333(1)
Stereo
334(1)
Radio Retro: The Birth of Multitrack Recording
335(1)
Recording Music
336(4)
Total-Sound Recording Microphone Techniques
336(1)
Isolated-Component Recording
337(3)
Electronic Equipment and Its Use in Radio Production
340(8)
Equipment
340(5)
Techniques
345(3)
Summary
348(3)
Applications
350(1)
Exercises
350(1)
Production, Programming, and the Modern Format
351(26)
The Audience and the Format
352(6)
The Audience
352(1)
Methods of Measuring Audience
353(3)
Calculating How Efficiently a Station Reaches Its Audience
356(1)
Paying for Efficiency
356(2)
The Specifics of the Radio Format
358(1)
Defining Current Formats
358(1)
Radio Retro: Where Did Formats Come From?
359(5)
The Major Formats
360(3)
Filling the Niche: Today's Trends
363(1)
On-Air and Off-Air Production in the Modern Format
364(6)
Production and Tune-out
364(2)
Production for Adult Contemporary
366(1)
Production for Album-Oriented Rock
367(1)
Production for Country
367(1)
Production for News/Talk
368(1)
Production for Top 40/CHR
369(1)
Production for Urban/Churban/Rhythmic Top 40
370(1)
Putting the Format On Air
370(2)
The Format and Sound Hour
371(1)
Constructing the Playlist
371(1)
Tuning into Technology: New Music and College Radio
372(3)
Conclusion
375(1)
Summary
375(2)
Exercises
376(1)
APPENDIXES
377(25)
Another Time: A Play by Richard Wilson
377(9)
A Capsule History of Radio: Past Meets Future for the Modern Producer and Programmer
386(14)
The Beginnings of the Magic Medium
386(1)
Radio Finds a Voice
387(1)
Radio After World War I
388(1)
Radio Carries a Tune
389(1)
Radio After KDKA: The Coming Chaos
390(1)
AT&T Develops Toll Broadcasting
391(1)
Exit AT&T
392(1)
Development of the Networks
392(1)
NBC and CBS
393(1)
New Competitors Set Their Sights on NBC
393(1)
Paley Takes Over CBS
394(1)
Advertising Comes of Age
394(1)
Sidebar: David Sarnoff and William S. Paley
395(1)
The Golden Age and Mass Entertainment
396(1)
Radio Comes of Age
397(2)
Television Lowers the Boom
399(1)
Rock Saves Radio
400(1)
Radio Tunes into Its Audience
401(1)
Glossary 402(12)
Suggested Readings 414(4)
Web Links 418(4)
Index 422


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