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Movies and Meaning : An Introduction to Film,9780205314157
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Movies and Meaning : An Introduction to Film

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780205314157

ISBN10:
0205314155
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/1/2000
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div
List Price: $64.60
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Summary

This comprehensive introduction to film focuses on three topics: how movies express meanings, how viewers understand those meanings, and how cinema focuses globally as both an art and a business. Using clear, accessible, and jargon-free writing, this is the only introductory film text to examine the elements of film style and the viewer's contribution to the cinema experience. How do viewers interpret the effects filmmakers create? How do filmmakers anticipate, and build on, the likely ways viewers will react to certain kinds of stories and audio-visual designs? The text examines both how filmmakers create images and sounds and the mechanisms and processes by which viewers make sense of images and stories on screen. This approach helps students understand not only the basic concepts but also how their own reactions and opinions impact the overall film experience, making the course even more meaningful.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
The Nature of Narrative in Film
1(48)
Story and Script
3(1)
The Turn to Narrative in Early Film History
4(4)
Elements of Narrative
8(13)
The Fictive Stance
8(2)
Narrative Structure: Story and Plot
10(7)
Authorship and Point of View
17(4)
The Classical Hollywood Narrative
21(7)
Alternatives to the Classical Narrative
24(4)
The Viewer's Contribution to Narrative
28(3)
Film Genres
31(16)
The Western
32(3)
The Gangster Film
35(5)
The Musical
40(2)
The Horror Film
42(5)
Summary
47(2)
Film Structure
49(44)
Elements of Film Structure
51(7)
The Production Process
51(1)
The Role of the Director
52(4)
Time and Space in Cinema
56(2)
Structure and the Camera
58(25)
Camera Position
58(6)
Camera Angle
64(6)
Camera Lens
70(5)
Camera Movement
75(8)
Structural Design and Creative Choice
83(2)
The Camera and Human Perception: Cinema's Dual Capability
85(5)
Transforming Visual Reality
86(1)
Corresponding with Visual Reality
87(3)
Summary
90(3)
Cinematography
93(32)
Collaboration and Previsualization
95(3)
The Essentials of Cinematography
98(20)
Film Stocks, Lenses, and Aspect Ratios
100(5)
Lighting Design
105(13)
Cinematography and Digital Effects
118(2)
Visual Style and Design Quotations
120(3)
Summary
123(2)
Production Design and Performance Style
125(39)
What the Production Designer Does
126(3)
Basic Tools of Production Design
129(7)
Costumes
130(1)
Sets, Mattes, and Miniatures
131(5)
The Design Concept
136(4)
Production Design and Special Effects
140(2)
Acting
142(20)
Acting in Film and Theater
142(4)
Categories of Film Performers
146(4)
Method and Technical Approaches to Performing
150(2)
The Performer as an Element of Visual Design
152(8)
Performance, Emotion, and the Viewer's Response
160(2)
Summary
162(2)
Editing: Making the Cut
164(45)
What Is Editing?
166(6)
Linear and Nonlinear Systems
166(1)
Types of Visual Transitions
167(5)
Functions of Editing
172(13)
Continuity
173(1)
Dramatic Focus
173(1)
Tempo and Mood
174(1)
Narration and Point of View
175(10)
The Principles of Continuity Editing
185(11)
A Continuous Flow of Action
185(8)
Errors of Continuity
193(1)
Facilitating the Viewer's Response
194(1)
Subverting Continuity Editing
194(2)
Alternatives to Continuity Editing
196(11)
Jump Cuts
196(1)
Montage
197(9)
Sequence Shots
206(1)
Summary
207(2)
Sound Design
209(42)
Evolution of Film Sound
211(3)
Types of Sound
214(17)
Dialogue
214(6)
Sound Effects
220(1)
Music
221(10)
Sound Design
231(18)
Differences between Sound and Image
232(2)
The Codes of Sound Design
234(15)
Summary
249(2)
Modes of Screen Reality
251(36)
Realism
253(10)
Ordinary Fictional Realism
253(4)
Historical Realism
257(2)
Documentary Realism
259(4)
Expressionism
263(9)
Classic German Expressionsim
264(2)
Contemporary Expressionism
266(6)
Fantasy and the Fantastic
272(7)
Ways of Making Fantasy Credible
273(3)
Fantasy and Cinema Technology
276(3)
Cinematic Self-Reflexivity
279(6)
Comic Self-Reflexivity
279(2)
Didactic Self-Reflexivity
281(4)
Impact on Viewers of Self-Reflexive Techniques
285(1)
Summary
285(2)
Hollywood International
287(30)
The Global Dominance of Hollywood
289(15)
The Majors
289(3)
Splitting the Box-Office Dollar
292(1)
Ancillary Markets
293(2)
Film and Product Merchandising
295(6)
Economic Significance of the Blockbuster Film
301(3)
International Influence of Hollywood Style
304(12)
Influence on Foreign Filmmakers
304(2)
Absorption of Foreign Filmmakers
306(2)
Remakes of Foreign Films
308(8)
Summary
316(1)
The Cinema in an International Frame
317(45)
The International Auteur Cinema
319(20)
Michelangelo Antonioni
319(5)
Ingmar Bergman
324(5)
Luis Bunuel
329(4)
Federico Fellini
333(2)
Akira Kurosawa
335(4)
Cinema and Society: The New Wave Phenomenon
339(20)
Italian Neorealism
339(5)
The French New Wave
344(6)
New German Cinema
350(6)
Hong Kong Cinema
356(3)
Importance of the International Cinema
359(1)
Summary
360(2)
Film Criticism and Interpretation
362(23)
Why Criticism Exists
363(2)
Polyvalence of the Sign
364(1)
The Task of the Critic
365(1)
Criticism as Rhetoric
365(1)
Modes of Criticism
366(8)
Newspaper and Television Reviewing
366(1)
General-Interest Journal-Based Criticism
367(3)
Scholarly Criticism
370(4)
Creating Criticism
374(9)
Interpretation
376(7)
The Steps in Creating Criticism
383(1)
Summary
383(2)
Models of Film Theory
385(36)
Realist Models
387(5)
Elements of Realist Theory: Bazin
387(3)
Strengths of Bazinian Realism
390(1)
Weaknesses of Bazinian Realism
391(1)
Other Realist Models
392(1)
Auteurist Modles
392(4)
Elements of Auteurism
393(2)
Strengths of the Auteur Model
395(1)
Weaknesses of the Auteur Model
395(1)
Psychoanalytic Models
396(5)
Elements of Psychoanalytic Models
397(3)
Strength of the Psychoanalytic Model
400(1)
Weaknesses of the Psychoanalytic Model
400(1)
Ideological Models
401(8)
Elements of Ideological Models
402(6)
Strength of the Ideological Model
408(1)
Weaknesses of the Ideological Model
409(1)
Feminist Models
409(4)
Elements of Feminist Models
409(3)
Strength of the Feminist Model
412(1)
Weaknesses of the Feminist Model
412(1)
Cognitive Models
413(5)
Elements of Cognitive Models
413(4)
Strength of the Cognitive Model
417(1)
Weaknesses of the Cognitive Model
417(1)
Summary
418(3)
Glossary 421(12)
Index 433


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