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Movies and Meaning : An Introduction to Film,9780205480777
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Movies and Meaning : An Introduction to Film

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780205480777

ISBN10:
0205480772
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon
List Price: $100.40

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This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2007.
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Summary

This comprehensive introduction to film focuses on three topics: how movies express meanings, how viewers understand those meanings, and how cinema functions globally as both an art and a business. Using clear, accessible, and jargon-free writing, this is the only introductory film text to examine the elements of film style and the viewer's contribution to the cinema experience. How do viewers interpret the effects filmmakers create? How do filmmakers anticipate, and build on, the likely ways viewers will react to certain kinds of stories and audio-visual designs? The text examines both how filmmakers create images and sounds, and the mechanisms and processes by which viewers make sense of images and stories on screen. This approach helps students understand not only the basic concepts but also how their own reactions and opinions impact the overall film experience. New to the Fourth Edition Includes a new chapter on Cinema in Multiple Contexts to provide in-depth coverage of the various modes of filmmaking, including animation, documentary, and independent and international film as well as a discussion of diverse filmmakers (i.e. women in film and African American film). Updated film examples and case studies throughout the text, explaining terms and concepts by using examples film students know, including Sin City, Fahrenheit 911, The Passion of the Christ, and Capturing the Friedmans. Offers expanded coverage of film genres, including science fiction, the war film, and film noir. Discusses hand-held camerawork, Steadicam, digital intermediates, the role of sound in contemporary film, and cinema in the DVD era to provide students with up-to-date coverage of new technologies and their impact on filmmaking. Provides an updated discussion of blockbusters, the film industry, and current box office trends to provide a more timely view of the business of film. Praise for Movies and Meaning "I think Movies and Meaning is still the best all-around introductory film text on the market today. I will continue to use it with pleasure." ~Thomas Sobchack, University of Utah"This text is user friendly in its size and weight, relatively compact, and manageable to transport and read. It has nice integration of photos with the text; overall the layout is inviting, engaging, dynamic. The writing is generally clear, accessible yet challenging. And the book covers most of what I consider to be important for students to successfully complete the course. David Laderman, College of San Mateold; This book has very good coverage of the topics, and it is well written. It is also organized well, with the earlier chapters supporting the material in later chapters about criticism and theory. The chapters on the studio system and how Hollywood influences and is influenced by international cinema are also very good. Jay Cofield, University of Montevallo.

Table of Contents

Preface to the Fourth Edition x
Preface to the Third Edition xi
Film Structure
1(47)
Elements of Film Structure
3(7)
The Production Process
3(1)
The Role of the Director
4(4)
Time and Space in Cinema
8(2)
Structure and the Camera
10(27)
Camera Position
10(8)
Camera Angle
18(5)
Camera Lens
23(7)
Camera Movement
30(7)
Structural Design and Creative Choice
37(4)
The Camera and Human Perception: Cinema's Dual Capability
41(5)
Transforming-Visual Reality
41(1)
Corresponding with Visual Reality
41(5)
Summary
46(2)
Cinematography
48(37)
Collaboration and Previsualization
50(1)
The Essentials of Cinematography
51(25)
Film Stocks, Lenses, and Aspect Ratios
55(7)
Lighting Design
62(14)
Cinematography and the Digital Domain
76(4)
The Digital Intermediate
77
Visual Effects
76(4)
Visual Style and Design Quotations
80(2)
Summary
82(3)
Production Design
85(25)
What the Production Designer Does
86(4)
Stages of Work
87(2)
Creating a Unified Design
89(1)
Basic Tools of Production Design
90(12)
Costumes
91(3)
Sets, Mattes, and Miniatures
94(8)
The Design Concept
102(4)
Production Design and Special Effects
106(2)
Summary
108(2)
Acting
110(28)
Acting in Film and Theater
113(6)
Lack of Rehearsal
113(1)
Shooting Out of Continuity
114(1)
Amplification of Gesture and Expression
115(1)
Lighting, Lenses, and Effects Work
116(2)
Lack of a Live Audience
118(1)
Categories of Film Performers
119(4)
The Star Persona
120(3)
Method and Technical Approaches to Performing
123(3)
The Performer as an Element of Visual Design
126(8)
Unique Body Language
126(1)
Choreographing Expression
127(3)
Typage
130(2)
Visual Design of Performance
132(2)
Performance, Emotion, and the Viewer's Response
134(2)
Interpretive and Emotional Responses by Viewers
134(2)
Summary
136(2)
Editing: Making the Cut
138(45)
What Is Editing?
140(1)
Linear and Nonlinear Systems
140(6)
Types of Visual Transitions
142(4)
Functions of Editing
146(13)
Continuity
146(1)
Dramatic Focus
147(1)
Tempo and Mood
148(1)
Narration and Point of View
149(10)
The Principles of Continuity Editing
159(11)
A Continuous Flow of Action
159(8)
Errors of Continuity
167(1)
Facilitating the Viewer's Response
168(1)
Subverting Continuity Editing
168(2)
Alternatives to Continuity Editing
170(11)
Jump Cuts
170(1)
Montage
171(9)
Sequence Shots
180(1)
Summary
181(2)
Principles of Sound Design
183(45)
Sound in Contemporary Film
185(3)
Evolution of Film Sound
188(3)
Types of Sound
191(18)
Dialogue
191(5)
Sound Effects
196(3)
Music
199(10)
Sound Design
209(17)
Differences between Sound and Image
210(2)
The Codes of Sound Design
212(14)
Summary
226(2)
The Nature of Narrative in Film
228(60)
Story and Script
230(1)
The Turn to Narrative in Early Film History
231(4)
Elements of Narrative
235(13)
The Fictive Stance
235(2)
Narrative Structure: Story and Plot
237(7)
Authorship and Point of View
244(4)
The Classical Hollywood Narrative
248(7)
Alternatives to the Classical Narrative
251(4)
The Viewer's Contribution to Narrative
255(3)
Film Genres
258(28)
The Western
259(4)
The Gangster Film
263(4)
The Musical
267(3)
The Horror Film
270(4)
Science Fiction
274(4)
The War Film
278(4)
Film Noir
282(4)
Summary
286(2)
Modes of Screen Reality
288(38)
Realism
290(11)
Ordinary Fictional Realism
290(4)
Historical Realism
294(3)
Documentary Realism
297(4)
Expressionism
301(9)
Classic German Expressionism
301(3)
Contemporary Expressionism
304(6)
Fantasy and the Fantastic
310(7)
Ways of Making Fantasy Credible
312(2)
Fantasy and Cinema Technology
314(3)
Cinematic Self-Reflexivity
317(7)
Comic Self-Reflexivity
317(2)
Didactic Self-Reflexivity
319(4)
Impact on Viewers of Self-Reflexive Techniques
323(1)
Summary
324(2)
Hollywood International
326(33)
The Global Dominance of Hollywood
329(17)
The Majors
329(3)
Splitting the Box-Office Dollar
332(1)
Ancillary Markets
333(4)
Film and Product Merchandising
337(5)
Economic Significance of the Blockbuster Film
342(4)
International Influence of Hollywood Style
346(11)
Influence on Foreign Filmmakers
346(2)
Absorption of Foreign Filmmakers
348(2)
Remakes of Foreign Films
350(7)
Summary
357(2)
Cinema in Multiple Contexts
359(53)
Animation
361(8)
2D Animation
361(4)
3D Animation
365(4)
The Future of Animation
369(1)
Documentary
369(8)
Advocacy
370(2)
Visual Poetry
372(2)
Direct Cinema
374(1)
Documentary Today
375(2)
Independent Film
377(7)
Production Companies
379(2)
Festivals
381(1)
Filmmakers
382(2)
International Film
384(8)
Foreign Film ``Hits''
384(2)
Categories of International Filmmakers
386(3)
The Golden Age of Foreign Film
389(2)
Is Cinephilia Dead?
391(1)
Women in Film
392(8)
Actors
392(4)
Filmmakers
396(4)
Production Executives and Personnel
400(1)
African American Film
400(10)
The 1990s Generation
401(1)
Actors
402(2)
A Segregated Industry
404(2)
The Hollywood Era
406(4)
Summary
410(2)
Film Criticism and Interpretation
412(24)
Why Criticism Exists
413(2)
The Task of the Critic
415(1)
Criticism as Rhetoric
415(1)
Criticism in the Era of Blockbusters
415(1)
Modes of Criticism
416(9)
Newspaper and Television Reviewing
416(2)
General-Interest Journal-Based Criticism
418(3)
Scholarly Criticism
421(4)
Creating Criticism
425(9)
Identification and Description
425(1)
Working Deductively
425(2)
Using Precise Terminology
427(1)
Interpretation
428(1)
Creating a Framework of Interpretation
429(2)
Attributional Errors
431(3)
The Steps in Creating Criticism
434(1)
Summary
434(2)
Models of Film Theory
436(38)
Realist Models
438(6)
Elements of Realist Theory: Bazin
439(3)
Strengths of Bazinian Realism
442(1)
Weaknesses of Bazinian Realism
443(1)
Other Realist Models
444(1)
Auteurist Models
444(5)
Elements of Auteurism
445(2)
Strengths of the Auteur Model
447(1)
Weaknesses of the Auteur Model
447(2)
Psychoanalytic Models
449(4)
Elements of Psychoanalytic Models
449(3)
Strengths of the Psychoanalytic Model
452(1)
Weaknesses of the Psychoanalytic Model
453(1)
Ideological Models
453(9)
Elements of Ideological Models
454(8)
Strengths of the Ideological Model
462(1)
Weaknesses of the Ideological Model
462(1)
Feminist Models
462(4)
Elements of Feminist Models
462(3)
Strengths of the Feminist Model
465(1)
Weaknesses of the Feminist Model
466(1)
Cognitive Models
466(5)
Elements of Cognitive Models
466(4)
Strengths of the Cognitive Model
470(1)
Weaknesses of the Cognitive Model
471(1)
Summary
471(3)
Glossary 474(13)
Index 487


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