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Moving History/Dancing Cultures : A Dance History Reader

by
ISBN13:

9780819564139

ISBN10:
0819564133
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
10/19/2001
Publisher(s):
Univ Pr of New England
List Price: $32.69

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Summary

This new collection of essays surveys the history of dance in an innovative and wide-ranging fashion. Editors Dils and Albright address the current dearth of comprehensive teaching material in the dance history field through the creation of a multifaceted, non-linear, yet well-structured and comprehensive survey of select moments in the development of both American and World dance. This book is illustrated with over 50 photographs, and would make an ideal text for undergraduate classes in dance ethnography, criticism or appreciation, as well as dance history--particularly those with a cross-cultural, contemporary, or an American focus. The reader is organized into four thematic sections which allow for varied and individualized course use: Thinking about Dance History: Theories and Practices, World Dance Traditions, America Dancing, and Contemporary Dance: Global Contexts. The editors have structured the readings with the understanding that contemporary theory has thoroughly questioned the discursive construction of history and the resultant canonization of certain dances, texts and points of view. The historical readings are presented in a way that encourages thoughtful analysis and allows the opportunity for critical engagement with the text.

Author Biography

Ann Cooper Albright is Associate Professor of Dance at Oberlin College and the author of Choreographing Difference: The Body and Identity in Contemporary Dance (Wesleyan, 1997). Ann Dils is Assistant Professor of Dance at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Her articles on dance reconstruction have been published in Dance Research Journal and other scholarly publications.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
x
First Steps: Moving into the Study of Dance History xiii
Ann Dils
Ann Cooper Albright
PART I---Thinking about Dance History: Theories and Practices
The Pleasures of Studying Dance History
2(5)
Ann Dils
Ann Cooper Albright
Beyond Description: Writing beneath the Surface
7(5)
Deborah Jowitt
Imagining Dance
12(5)
Joan Acocella
Searching for Nijinsky's Sacre
17(13)
Millicent Hodson
Five Premises for a Culturally Sensitive Approach to Dance
30(3)
Deidre Sklar
An Anthropologist Looks at Ballet as a Form of Ethnic Dance
33(11)
Joann Kealiinohomoku
The Trouble with the Male Dancer. . .
44(12)
Ramsay Burt
Strategic Abilities: Negotiating the Disabled Body in Dance
56(11)
Ann Cooper Albright
Dancing in the Field: Notes from Memory
67(25)
Sally Ann Ness
Further Readings
87(5)
PART II---World Dance Traditions
Looking at World Dance
92(5)
Ann Dils
Ann Cooper Albright
Trance and Ecstatic Dance
97(6)
Erika Bourgignon
Bharatha Natyam---What Are You?
103(11)
Avanthi Meduri
Medicine of the Brave: A Look at the Changing Role of Dance in Native Culture from the Buffalo Days to the Modern Powwow
114(14)
Lisa Doolittle
Heather Elton
The Belly Dance: Ancient Ritual to Cabaret Performance
128(8)
Shawna Helland
Changing Images and Shifting Identities: Female Performers in Egypt
136(8)
Karin van Nieuwkerk
Commonalties in African Dance: An Aesthetic Foundation
144(8)
Kariamu Welsh Asante
Invention and Reinvention in the Traditional Arts
152(13)
Z. S. Strother
Headspin: Capoeira's Ironic Inversions
165(9)
Barbara Browning
Epitome of Korean Folk Dance
174(4)
Lee Kyong-hee
The Many Faces of Korean Dance
178(13)
Judy Van Zile
Writing Dancing, 1573
191(11)
Mark Franko
Beyond La Danse Noble: Conventions in Choreography and Dance Performance at the Time of Rameau's Hippolyte et Aricie
202(8)
Catherine Turocy
The Travesty Dancer in Nineteenth-Century Ballet
210(8)
Lynn Garafola
Interrupted Continuities: Modern Dance in Germany
218(14)
Susan Allene Manning
Melissa Benson
Further Readings
228(4)
PART III---America Dancing
Historical Moments: Rethinking the Past
232(6)
Ann Dils
Ann Cooper Albright
The Irresistible Other: Hopi Ritual Drama and Euro-American Audiences
238(12)
Sharyn R. Udall
Juba and American Minstrelsy
250(6)
Marian Hannah Winter
Dancing Out the Difference: Cultural Imperialism and Ruth St. Denis's Radha of 1906
256(15)
Jane Desmond
Two-Stepping to Glory: Social Dance and the Rhetoric of Social Mobility
271(17)
Julie Malnig
The Natural Body
288(12)
Ann Daly
Form as the Image of Human Perfectibility and Natural Order
300(7)
Deborah Jowitt
The Harsh and Splendid Heroines of Martha Graham
307(8)
Marcia B. Siegel
The Dance Is a Weapon
315(8)
Ellen Graff
In His Image: Diaghilev and Lincoln Kirstein
323(9)
Nancy Reynolds
Stripping the Emperor: The Africanist Presence in American Concert Dance
332(10)
Brenda Dixon Gottschild
Simmering Passivity: The Black Male Body in Concert Dance
342(8)
Thomas DeFrantz
Choreographic Methods of the Judson Dance Theater
350(12)
Sally Banes
Chance Heroes
362(8)
Deborah Jowitt
Further Readings
365(5)
PART IV---Contemporary Dance: Global Contexts
Moving Contexts
370(6)
Ann Dils
Ann Cooper Albright
Butoh: ``Twenty Years Ago We Were Crazy, Dirty, and Mad''
376(8)
Bonnie Sue Stein
Dancing on the Endangered List: Aesthetics and Politics of Indigenous Dance in the Philippines
384(5)
Kathleen Foreman
Chandralekha: Negotiating the Female Body and Movement in Cultural/Political Signification
389(9)
Ananya Chatterjea
Ananya and Chandralekha---A Response to ``Chandralekha: Negotiating the Female Body and Movement in Cultural/Political Signification''
398(6)
Uttara Coorlawala
Looking at Movement as Culture: Contact Improvisation to Disco
404(10)
Cynthia Jean
Cohen Bull
10,000 Jams Later: Contact Improvisation in Canada 1974-95
414(7)
Peter Ryan
Improvisation Is a Word for Something That Can't Keep a Name
421(6)
Steve Paxton
Simply(?) the Doing of It, Like Two Arms Going Round and Round
427(12)
Susan Leigh Foster
Embodying History: Epic Narrative and Cultural Identity in African American Dance
439(16)
Ann Cooper Albright
A Little Technology Is a Dangerous Thing
455(4)
Richard Povall
Technique/Technology/Technique
459(3)
Lisa Marie Naugle
Absent/Presence
462(13)
Ann Dils
Further Readings
472(3)
About the Contributors 475(6)
Permissions 481(4)
Index 485


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