CART

(0) items

Multicultural Social Work Practice,9780471662525
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Multicultural Social Work Practice

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780471662525

ISBN10:
0471662526
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
10/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Wiley
List Price: $91.70

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$19.90

Buy Used Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
U9780471662525
$64.19

Buy New Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
N9780471662525
$88.03

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $51.05
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 1st edition with a publication date of 10/1/2005.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Related Products


  • Outlines and Highlights for Multicultural Social Work Practice by Derald Wing Sue, Monica Mcgoldrick , Isbn : 9780471662525
    Outlines and Highlights for Multicultural Social Work Practice by Derald Wing Sue, Monica Mcgoldrick , Isbn : 9780471662525




Summary

The groundbreaking new text for culturally competent social work practice In Multicultural Social Work Practice, author Derald Wing Sue, one of the most prominent and respected pioneers in diversity research and practice, explores and synthesizes the important theoretical, political, and philosophical concepts related to cultural competence in the field of social work. This comprehensive yet practical text offers students definitive guidance on culturally sensitive social work practice. This important new work challenges the reader to consider the different worldviews of a highly diversified population, and achieve cultural competence through increased awareness, knowledge, and skills. It provides specific definitions of multiculturalism, cultural competence, and multicultural social work that clearly guide discussion, analysis, and debate. It also highlights the sociopolitical and social justice aspects of effective practice, and closely examines how social work theories, concepts, and practices are often rooted in and reflective of the values of the dominant society. Multicultural Social Work Practice features sections on: Conceptual dimensions of multicultural social work practice The political dimensions of social work practice Racial/cultural identity development-social work implication The practice dimensions of multicultural social work Systemic and ecological perspectives of multicultural social work Profiles in culturally competent care for diverse populations In addition to the aforementioned coverage, this innovative text features unique chapters on barriers to effective practice, cultural styles in intervention strategies, and indigenous healing strategies. It also employs generous clinical and real-life examples to illustrate important concepts. A lively, provocative guidebook that challenges traditional social work practice, and featuring a foreword by Monica McGoldrick, Multicultural Social Work Practice is a benchmark text for students of social work, professional social workers, and others in the helping professions.

Author Biography

DERALD WING SUE, PhD, is Professor of Psychology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University and holds a joint appointment with the Columbia University School of Social Work. He is past president of the Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues (Division 45 of the American Psychological Association) and past president of the APA's Division on Counseling Psychology. He is the coauthor with David Sue of Counseling the Culturally Diverse, Fourth Edition (Wiley), the most widely used multicultural text in counseling and psychology programs.

Foreword by MONICA MCGOLDRICK, PhD, Director, Multicultural Family Institute of New Jersey, Highland Park, New Jersey.

Table of Contents

Foreword xiii
Preface xvii
Part I The Conceptual Dimensions of Multicultural Social Work Practice
1(40)
Principles and Assumptions of Multicultural Social Work Practice
3(20)
The Diversification of the United States and Implications for Social Work
4(3)
The Graying of the Workforce and Society
4(1)
The Feminization of the Workforce and Society
5(1)
The Changing Complexion of the Workforce and Society
6(1)
Cultural Diversity and the Challenge to Social Work
7(8)
Theme One: Cultural Universality versus Cultural Relativism
10(1)
Theme Two: The Emotional Consequences of ``Race and/or Differences''
11(1)
Theme Three: The Inclusive or Exclusive Nature of Multiculturalism
12(1)
Theme Four: The Sociopolitical Nature of Social Work Practice
13(1)
Theme Five: The Nature of Culturally Competent Social Work Practice
14(1)
The Multiple Dimensions of Human Existence
15(3)
Individual and Universal Biases in Social Work
18(2)
What Is Multicultural Social Work Practice?
20(3)
Becoming Culturally Competent in Social Work Practice
23(18)
Defining Cultural Competence in Social Work Practice
23(1)
The Four Components of Cultural Competence
24(5)
Competency One: Becoming Aware of One's Own Assumptions, Values, and Biases about Human Behavior
25(1)
Competency Two: Understanding the Worldview of Culturally Diverse Clients
26(1)
Competency Three: Developing Appropriate Intervention Strategies and Techniques
27(1)
Competency Four: Understanding Organizational and Institutional Forces that Enhance or Negate Cultural Competence
28(1)
A Working Definition of Cultural Competence
29(1)
Multidimensional Model of Cultural Competence in Social Work
30(8)
Dimension I: Group-Specific Worldviews
32(1)
Dimension II: Components of Cultural Competence
32(5)
Dimension III: Foci of Social Work Interventions
37(1)
Implications for Social Work Practice
38(3)
Part II The Political Dimensions of Social Work Practice
41(44)
Understanding the Sociopolitical Implications of Oppression in Social Work Practice
43(20)
Effects of Historical and Current Oppression
47(2)
Ethnocentric Monoculturalism
49(4)
Belief in Superiority
50(1)
Belief in the Inferiority of Others
50(1)
Power to Impose Standards
51(1)
Manifestation in Institutions
51(1)
The Invisible Veil
52(1)
Historical Manifestations of Ethnocentric Monoculturalism
53(2)
Impact of Ethnocentric Monoculturalism in Helping Relationships
55(2)
Credibility and Attractiveness in Multicultural Social Work Practice
57(4)
Credibility of Social Worker
57(4)
Implications for Social Work Practice
61(2)
Sociopolitical Dimensions of Worldviews
63(22)
The Formation of Worldviews
65(1)
Value Orientation Model of Worldviews
66(7)
Locus of Control
68(3)
Locus of Responsibility
71(2)
Formation of Worldviews
73(12)
Internal Locus of Control (IC)--Internal Locus of Responsibility (IR)
74(3)
External Locus of Control (EC)--Internal Locus of Responsibility (IR)
77(1)
External Locus of Control (EC)--External Locus of Responsibility (ER)
78(2)
Internal Locus of Control (IC)--External Locus of Responsibility (ER)
80(5)
Part III Racial/Cultural Identity Development: Social Work Implications
85(44)
Racial/Cultural Minority Identity Development
87(20)
Racial/Cultural Identity Development Models
88(4)
Black Identity Development Models
89(1)
Other Racial/Ethnic Identity Development Models
90(1)
Feminist Identity Theory
91(1)
A Working Racial/Cultural Identity Development Model
92(12)
Conformity Stage
93(5)
Dissonance Stage
98(1)
Resistance and Immersion Stage
99(2)
Introspection Stage
101(2)
Integrative Awareness Stage
103(1)
Social Work Implications of the R/CID Model
104(3)
White Racial Identity Development
107(22)
What Does It Mean to Be White?
107(3)
42-year-old White Business Man
107(1)
26-year-old White Female College Student
108(1)
65-year-old White Male Retired Construction Worker
108(1)
34-year-old White Female Stockbroker
108(1)
29-year-old Latina Administrative Assistant
109(1)
39-year-old Black Male Salesman
109(1)
21-year-old Chinese American Male College Student (majoring in ethnic studies)
110(1)
The Invisible Whiteness of Being
110(4)
Understanding the Dynamics of Whiteness
112(2)
Models of White Racial Identity Development
114(6)
The Hardiman White Racial Identity Development Model
115(2)
The Helms White Racial Identity Model
117(3)
The Process of White Racial Identity Development: A Descriptive Model
120(7)
Conformity Phase
122(1)
Dissonance Phase
123(2)
Resistance and Immersion Phase
125(1)
Introspection Phase
126(1)
Integrative Awareness Phase
127(1)
Implications for Social Work Practice
127(2)
Part IV The Practice Dimensions of Multicultural Social Work
129(96)
Barriers to Effective Multicultural Clinical Practice
131(22)
Generic Characteristics of Counseling/Therapy
135(3)
Sources of Conflict and Misinterpretation in Clinical Practice
138(11)
Culture-Bound Values
138(7)
Class-Bound Values
145(3)
Language Barriers
148(1)
Generalizations and Stereotypes: Some Cautions
149(1)
Implications for Social Work Practice
150(3)
Cultural Styles in Multicultural Intervention Strategies
153(20)
Communication Styles
155(1)
Nonverbal Communication
156(8)
Proxemics
157(1)
Kinesics
158(2)
Paralanguage
160(2)
High-/Low-Context Communication
162(2)
Sociopolitical Facets of Nonverbal Communication
164(6)
Nonverbals as Reflections of Bias
165(2)
Nonverbals as Triggers to Biases and Fears
167(3)
Differential Skills in Multicultural Social Work Practice
170(1)
Implications for Social Work Practice
171(2)
Multicultural Family Counseling and Therapy
173(26)
Family Systems Approaches and Assumptions
179(2)
Issues in Working with Ethnic Minority Families
181(6)
Ethnic Minority Reality
181(1)
Conflicting Value Systems
182(1)
Biculturalism
182(1)
Ethnic Differences in Minority Status
183(2)
Ethnicity and Language
185(1)
Ethnicity and Social Class
186(1)
Multicultural Family Social Work: A Conceptual Model
187(8)
People-Nature Relationship
188(1)
Time Dimension
189(2)
Relational Dimension
191(1)
Activity Dimension
192(2)
Nature of People Dimension
194(1)
Implications for Social Work Practice
195(4)
Non-Western and Indigenous Methods of Healing
199(26)
Spirit Attacks: The Case of Vang Xiong
199(2)
Symptoms and Cause
200(1)
Shamanic Cure
200(1)
The Legitimacy of Culture-Bound Syndromes: Nightmare Deaths and the Hmong Sudden Death Phenomenon
201(2)
Causation and Spirit Possession
203(3)
The Shaman as Therapist: Commonalities
206(5)
A Case of Child Abuse?
207(4)
The Principles of Indigenous Healing
211(9)
Holistic Outlook, Interconnectedness, and Harmony
213(3)
Belief in Metaphysical Levels of Existence
216(1)
Spirituality in Life and the Cosmos
217(3)
Conclusions
220(5)
Implications for Social Work Practice
220(5)
Part V Systemic and Ecological Perspectives of Multicultural Social Work
225(30)
Multicultural Organizational Change and Social Justice
227(28)
Monocultural versus Multicultural Organizational Perspectives in Social Work
229(6)
Lesson One: A failure to develop a balanced perspective between person focus and system focus can result in false attribution of the problem
231(1)
Lesson Two: A failure to develop a balanced perspective between person focus and system focus can result in an ineffective and inaccurate treatment plan that is potentially harmful toward the client
232(1)
Lesson Three: When the client is the ``organization'' or a larger system and not an ``individual,'' it requires a major paradigm shift to attain a true understanding of problem and solution identification
232(1)
Lesson Four: Organizations are microcosms of the wider society from which they originate. As a result, they are likely to be reflections of the monocultural values and practices of the larger culture
233(1)
Lesson Five: Organizations are powerful entities that inevitably resist change and possess within their arsenal many ways to force compliance in individuals
233(1)
Lesson Six: When multicultural organizational development is required, alternative helping roles that emphasize systems intervention must be part of the role repertoire of the social worker
234(1)
Lesson Seven: Although remediation will always be needed, prevention is better
234(1)
Models of Multicultural Organizational Development
235(3)
Culturally Competent Social Service Agencies
238(4)
The Social Justice Agenda of Multicultural Social Work
242(3)
Antiracism as a Social Justice Agenda
245(8)
Principle One: Having Intimate and Close Contact with Others
246(1)
Principle Two: Cooperating Rather Than Competing
247(1)
Principle Three: Sharing Mutual Goals
248(1)
Principle Four: Exchanging Accurate Information
248(1)
Principle Five: Sharing an Equal Relationship
249(2)
Principle Six: Supporting Racial Equity by Leaders and Groups in Authority
251(1)
Principle Seven: Feeling Connected and Experiencing a Strong Sense of Belonging
251(2)
Social Work Must Advocate for Social Change
253(2)
Part VI Profiles in Culturally Competent Care for Diverse Populations
255(76)
Profiles of Culturally Competent Care with African American, Asian American, and Native American Populations
257(20)
African American Profile
258(6)
Important Dimensions
258(6)
Asian American Profile
264(5)
Important Dimensions
264(5)
Native American/American Indian Profile
269(8)
Important Dimensions
270(7)
Profiles of Culturally Competent Care with Biracial/Multiracial, Latino/Hispanic, and Immigrant/Refugee Populations
277(22)
Biracial/Multiracial Profile
277(7)
Important Dimensions
277(7)
Latino/Hispanic American Profile
284(7)
Important Dimensions
285(6)
Immigrants/Refugees Profile
291(8)
Important Dimensions
292(7)
Profiles of Culturally Competent Care with Women, Sexual Minorities, Elderly Persons, and Those with Disabilities
299(32)
Women Profile
299(7)
Important Dimensions
299(7)
Sexual Minority Profile
306(8)
Important Dimensions
306(8)
Elderly Persons Profile
314(9)
Important Dimensions
315(8)
Persons with Disability Profile
323(8)
Important Dimensions
323(8)
References 331(22)
Author Index 353(6)
Subject Index 359


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...