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My Freshman Year : What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student,9780801443978

My Freshman Year : What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student

by
ISBN13:

9780801443978

ISBN10:
0801443970
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
7/29/2005
Publisher(s):
Cornell Univ Pr
List Price: $23.89

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Summary

After more than fifteen years of teaching, Rebekah Nathan, a professor of anthropology at a large state university, realized that she no longer understood the behavior and attitudes of her students. Fewer and fewer participated in class discussion, tackled the assigned reading, or came to discuss problems during office hours. And she realized from conversations with her colleagues that they, too, were perplexed: Why were students today so different and so hard to teach? Were they, in fact, more likely to cheat, ruder, and less motivated? Did they care at all about their education, besides their grades?
Nathan decided to put her wealth of experience in overseas ethnographic fieldwork to use closer to home and applied to her own university. Accepted on the strength of her high school transcript, she took a sabbatical and enrolled as a freshman for the academic year. She immersed herself in student life, moving into the dorms and taking on a full course load. She ate in the student cafeteria, joined student clubs, and played regular pick-up games of volleyball and tag football (sports at which the athletic fifty-something-year-old could hold her own). Nathan had resolved that, if asked, she would not lie about her identity: she found that her classmates, if they were curious about why she was attending college at her age, never questioned her about her personal life.
Based on her interviews and conversations with fellow classmates, her interactions with professors and with other university employees and offices, and her careful day-to-day observations, My Freshman Year provides an account of college life that should be read by students, parents, professors, university administrators, and anyone else concerned about the state of higher education in America today. Placing her own experiences and those of her classmates into a broader context drawn from national surveys of college life, Nathan finds that today's students face new challenges to which academic institutions have not adapted. At the end of her freshman year, she has an affection and respect for students as a whole that she had previously reserved only for certain individuals. Being a student, she discovers, is hard work. But she also identifies fundamental misperceptions, misunderstandings, and mistakes on both sides of the educational divide that negatively affect the college experience.

Author Biography

Rebekah Nathan is a pseudonym

Table of Contents

Prefacep. vii
Welcome to "AnyU"p. 1
Life in the Dormsp. 19
Community and Diversityp. 41
As Others See Usp. 67
Academically Speaking...p. 90
The Art of College Managementp. 107
Lessons from My Year as a Freshmanp. 132
Afterword: Ethics and Ethnographyp. 158
Notesp. 169
Referencesp. 177
Indexp. 181
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.


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