CART

(0) items

Negotiation,9780072973075
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Negotiation

by ; ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780072973075

ISBN10:
0072973072
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
4/26/2005
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill/Irwin
List Price: $193.05
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $3.94
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Negotiation
    Negotiation
  • Negotiation
    Negotiation
  • Negotiation
    Negotiation




Summary

Negotiation is a critical skill needed for effective management. Negotiation 5/e explores the major concepts and theories of the psychology of bargaining and negotiation, and the dynamics of interpersonal and intergroup conflict and its resolution. It is relevant to a broad spectrum of management students, not only human resource management or industrial relations candidates.

Table of Contents

Part 1: Negotiation Fundamentals
The Nature of Negotiation
1(31)
A Few Words about Our Style and Approach
3(1)
Joe and Sue Carter
4(2)
Characteristics of a Negotiation Situation
6(2)
Interdependence
8(4)
Types of Interdependence Affect Outcomes
11(1)
Alternatives Shape Interdependence
11(1)
Mutual Adjustment
12(3)
Mutual Adjustment and Concession Making
13(1)
Two Dilemmas in Mutual Adjustment
14(1)
Value Claiming and Value Creation
15(3)
Conflict
18(4)
Definitions
18(1)
Levels of Conflict
18(1)
Functions and Dysfunctions of Conflict
19(1)
Factors That Make Conflict Easy or Difficult to Manage
20(2)
Effective Conflict Management
22(2)
Overview of the Chapters in This Book
24(6)
Chapter Summary
30(2)
Strategy and Tactics of Distributive Bargaining
32(39)
The Distributive Bargaining Situation
33(8)
The Role of Alternatives to a Negotiated Agreement
36(1)
Settlement Point
37(1)
Bargaining Mix
37(1)
Fundamental Strategies
38(1)
Discovering the Other Party's Resistance Point
38(1)
Influencing the Other Party's Resistance Point
39(2)
Tactical Tasks
41(7)
Assessing the Other Party's Target, Resistance Point, and Costs of Terminating Negotiations
41(2)
Manage the Other Party's Impressions
43(2)
Modify the Other Party's Perceptions
45(1)
Manipulate the Actual Costs of Delay or Termination
46(2)
Positions Taken during Negotiation
48(6)
Opening Offers
48(1)
Opening Stance
49(1)
Initial Concessions
49(1)
Role of Concessions
50(2)
Pattern of Concession Making
52(1)
Final Offers
53(1)
Commitment
54(5)
Tactical Considerations in Using Commitments
54(2)
Establishing a Commitment
56(1)
Preventing the Other Party from Committing Prematurely
57(1)
Finding Ways to Abandon a Committed Position
58(1)
Closing the Deal
59(1)
Hardball Tactics
60(9)
Dealing with Typical Hardball Tactics
61(1)
Typical Hardball Tactics
62(7)
Distributive Bargaining Skills Applicable to Integrative Negotiations
69(1)
Chapter Summary
69(2)
Strategy and Tactics of Integrative Negotiation
71(31)
Introduction
71(1)
What Makes Integrative Negotiation Different?
72(1)
An Overview of the Integrative Negotiation Process
72(3)
Creating a Free Flow of Information
73(1)
Attempting to Understand the Other Negotiator's Real Needs and Objectives
73(1)
Emphasizing the Commonalities between the Parties and Minimizing the Differences
74(1)
Searching for Solutions That Meet the Needs and Objectives of Both Sides
74(1)
Key Steps in the Integrative Negotiation Process
75(18)
Identify and Define the Problem
76(2)
Understand the Problem Fully---Identify Interests and Needs
78(4)
Generate Alternative Solutions
82(7)
Evaluate and Select Alternatives
89(4)
Factors That Facilitate Successful Integrative Negotiation
93(5)
Some Common Objective or Goal
93(1)
Faith in One's Problem-Solving Ability
93(1)
A Belief in the Validity of One's Own Position and the Other's Perspective
94(1)
The Motivation and Commitment to Work Together
94(1)
Trust
95(1)
Clear and Accurate Communication
96(1)
An Understanding of the Dynamics of Integrative Negotiation
97(1)
Summary
98(1)
Why Integrative Negotiation Is Difficult to Achieve
98(2)
The History of the Relation between the Parties
98(1)
A Belief That an Issue Can Only Be Resolved Distributively
98(2)
The Mixed-Motive Nature of Most Negotiating Situations
100(1)
Chapter Summary
100(2)
Negotiation: Strategy and Planning
102(30)
Goals---The Focus That Drives a Negotiation Strategy
103(2)
Direct Effects of Goals on Choice of Strategy
103(1)
Indirect Effects of Goals on Choice of Strategy
104(1)
Strategy---The Overall Plan to Achieve One's Goals
105(5)
Strategy versus Tactics
105(1)
Unilateral versus Bilateral Applications to Strategy
105(1)
The Dual Concerns Model as a Vehicle for Describing Negotiation Strategies
106(4)
Understanding the Flow of Negotiation: Stages and Phases
110(3)
Getting Ready to Implement the Strategy: The Planning Process
113(18)
Defining the Issues
115(2)
Assembling the Issues and Defining the Bargaining Mix
117(1)
Defining Interests
118(1)
Knowing Limits and Alternatives
119(1)
Setting Targets and Openings
120(1)
Assessing Constituents and the Social Context of the Negotiation
121(3)
Analyzing the Other Party
124(4)
Presenting Issues to the Other Party
128(1)
What Protocol Needs to Be Followed in This Negotiation?
129(2)
Chapter Summary
131(1)
Part 2: Negotiation Subprocesses
Perception, Cognition, and Emotion
132(30)
Perception
132(3)
Perception Defined
132(1)
Perceptual Distortion
133(2)
Framing
135(9)
Types of Frames
137(1)
How Frames Work in Negotiation
137(2)
Another Approach to Frames: Interests, Rights, and Power
139(2)
The Frame of an Issue Changes as the Negotiation Evolves
141(2)
Summary
143(1)
Cognitive Biases in Negotiation
144(8)
Irrational Escalation of Commitment
144(1)
Mythical Fixed-Pie Beliefs
144(1)
Anchoring and Adjustment
145(1)
Issue Framing and Risk
146(1)
Availability of Information
147(1)
The Winner's Curse
148(1)
Overconfidence
148(1)
The Law of Small Numbers
149(1)
Self-Serving Biases
150(1)
Endowment Effect
151(1)
Ignoring Others' Cognitions
152(1)
Reactive Devaluation
152(1)
Managing Misperceptions and Cognitive Biases in Negotiation
152(3)
Reframing
155(1)
Mood, Emotion, and Negotiation
155(5)
Chapter Summary
160(2)
Communication
162(21)
Basic Models of Communication
162(3)
Distortion in Communication
163(2)
What Is Communicated during Negotiation?
165(4)
Offers, Counteroffers, and Motives
166(1)
Information about Alternatives
166(1)
Information about Outcomes
167(1)
Social Accounts
167(1)
Communication about Process
167(1)
Is More Information Always Better?
168(1)
How People Communicate in Negotiation
169(6)
Use of Language
169(2)
Use of Nonverbal Communication
171(1)
Selection of a Communication Channel
172(3)
How to Improve Communication in Negotiation
175(5)
The Use of Questions
176(1)
Listening
176(4)
Role Reversal
180(1)
Special Communication Considerations at the Close of Negotiations
180(2)
Avoiding Fatal Mistakes
181(1)
Achieving Closure
181(1)
Chapter Summary
182(1)
Finding and Using Negotiation Power
183(21)
Why Is Power Important to Negotiators?
183(1)
A Definition of Power
184(3)
Sources of Power---How People Acquire Power
187(14)
Informational Sources of Power
188(3)
Power Based on Personality and Individual Differences
191(1)
Power Based on Position in an Organization
192(4)
Power Based on Relationships
196(4)
Contextual Sources of Power
200(1)
Dealing with Others Who Have More Power
201(1)
Chapter Summary
202(2)
Influence
204(30)
Two Routes to Influence: An Organizing Model
204(1)
The Central Route to Influence: The Message and Its Delivery
205(8)
Message Content
205(3)
Message Structure
208(1)
Persuasive Style: How to Pitch the Message
209(3)
Section Summary
212(1)
Peripheral Routes to Influence
213(16)
Aspects of Messages That Foster Peripheral Influence
213(2)
Source Characteristics That Foster Peripheral Influence
215(7)
Aspects of Context That Foster Peripheral Influence
222(6)
Section Summary
228(1)
The Role of Receivers---Targets of Influence
229(4)
Exploring or Ignoring the Other's Position
229(1)
Resisting the Other's Influence
230(3)
Chapter Summary
233(1)
Ethics in Negotiation
234(41)
A Sampling of Ethical Quandaries
234(2)
What Do We Mean by ``Ethics'' and Why Do They Matter in Negotiation?
236(2)
Ethics Defined
236(1)
Applying Ethical Reasoning to Negotiation
237(1)
Ethics versus Prudence versus Practicality versus Legality
237(1)
Four Approaches to Ethical Reasoning
238(8)
End-Result Ethics
241(1)
Duty Ethics
241(3)
Social Contract Ethics
244(1)
Personalistic Ethics
244(2)
What Questions of Ethical Conduct Arise in Negotiation?
246(7)
Ethically Ambiguous Tactics: It's (Mostly) All about the Truth
246(2)
Identifying Ethically Ambiguous Tactics and Attitudes toward Their Use
248(3)
Deception by Omission versus Commission
251(1)
The Decision to Use Ethically Ambiguous Tactics: A Model
251(2)
Why Use Deceptive Tactics? Motives and Consequences
253(6)
The Power Motive
253(1)
Other Motives to Behave Unethically
253(2)
The Consequences of Unethical Conduct
255(1)
Explanations and Justifications
256(3)
What Factors Shape a Negotiator's Predisposition to Use Unethical Tactics?
259(11)
Demographic Factors
261(2)
Personality Differences
263(1)
Moral Development and Personal Values
264(1)
Contextual Influences on Unethical Conduct
265(5)
How Can Negotiators Deal with the Other Party's Use of Deception?
270(3)
Chapter Summary
273(2)
Part 3: Negotiation Contexts
Relationships in Negotiation
275(25)
The Adequacy of Established Theory and Research for Understanding Negotiation within Relationships
275(5)
Forms of Relationships
280(5)
Four Fundamental Relationship Forms
281(2)
Dimensions of Relationships
283(1)
Negotiations in Communal Relationships
284(1)
Section Summary
285(1)
Key Elements in Managing Negotiations within Relationships
285(13)
Reputation
286(1)
Trust
287(6)
Justice
293(3)
Relationships among Reputation, Trust, and Justice
296(1)
Repairing a Relationship
297(1)
Chapter Summary
298(2)
Agents, Constituencies, Audiences
300(29)
The Number of Parties in a Negotiation
300(1)
How Agents, Constituents, and Audiences Change Negotiations
301(12)
Audiences: Team Members, Constituents, Bystanders, and Others
302(10)
Tactical Implications of Social Structure Dynamics: The Negotiator's Dilemma
312(1)
Constituencies and Audiences
313(12)
When to Use an Agent
325(2)
Managing Agents
327(1)
Chapter Summary
327(2)
Coalitions
329(20)
A Situation with More Than Two Parties
329(2)
What Is a Coalition?
331(1)
Types of Coalitions
332(1)
How and Why Coalitions Form and Develop
332(9)
When Do Coalitions Form?
332(5)
How Do Coalitions Develop?
337(4)
Standards for Coalition Decision Making
341(6)
Power and Leverage in Coalitions
342(2)
How to Build Coalitions: Some Practical Advice
344(3)
Chapter Summary
347(2)
Multiple Parties and Teams
349(26)
The Nature of Multiparty Negotiations
349(9)
Differences between Two-Party Negotiations and Multiparty Negotiations
350(5)
What Is an Effective Group?
355(3)
Managing Multiparty Negotiations
358(14)
The Prenegotiation Stage
358(2)
The Formal Negotiation Stage---Managing the Group Process and Outcome
360(9)
The Agreement Phase
369(3)
Interteam Negotiations
372(2)
Chapter Summary
374(1)
Part 4: Individual Differences
Individual Differences I: Gender and Negotiation
375(12)
Defining Sex and Gender
375(1)
Research on Gender Differences in Negotiation
376(2)
Male and Female Negotiators: Theoretical Perspectives
376(2)
Empirical Findings on Gender Differences in Negotiation
378(7)
Overcoming the Disadvantage of Gender Differences
384(1)
Chapter Summary
385(2)
Individual Differences II: Personality and Abilities
387(18)
Early Research on Individual Differences and Negotiation
387(2)
Personality and Negotiation
389(9)
Conflict Management Style
389(2)
Social Value Orientation
391(1)
Interpersonal Trust
392(1)
Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control
393(1)
Self-Monitoring
394(1)
Machiavellianism
395(1)
Face Threat Sensitivity
396(1)
The ``Big Five'' Personality Factors
396(1)
Section Summary
396(2)
Abilities in Negotiation
398(4)
Cognitive Ability
398(1)
Emotional Intelligence
399(1)
Perspective-Taking Ability
400(2)
The Behavioral Approach to Differences among Negotiators
402(1)
Chapter Summary
403(2)
Part 5: Negotiation across Cultures
International and Cross-Cultural Negotiation
405(32)
What Makes International Negotiation Different?
407(6)
Environmental Context
407(3)
Immediate Context
410(2)
How Do We Explain International Negotiation Outcomes?
412(1)
Conceptualizing Culture and Negotiation
413(6)
Culture as Learned Behavior
413(1)
Culture as Shared Values
414(4)
Culture as Dialectic
418(1)
Culture in Context
419(1)
The Influence of Culture on Negotiation: Managerial Perspectives
419(5)
Definition of Negotiation
420(1)
Negotiation Opportunity
420(1)
Selection of Negotiators
420(1)
Protocol
420(1)
Communication
421(1)
Time Sensitivity
422(1)
Risk Propensity
422(1)
Groups versus Individuals
423(1)
Nature of Agreements
423(1)
Emotionalism
423(1)
The Influence of Culture on Negotiation: Research Perspectives
424(6)
Negotiation Outcomes
424(2)
Negotiation Process
426(2)
Effects of Culture on Negotiator Cognition
428(1)
Effect of Culture on Negotiator Ethics and Tactics
429(1)
Effect of Culture on Conflict Resolution
429(1)
Culturally Responsive Negotiation Strategies
430(5)
Low Familiarity
433(1)
Moderate Familiarity
434(1)
High Familiarity
434(1)
Chapter Summary
435(2)
Part 6: Resolving Differences
Managing Negotiation Impasses
437(29)
Introduction
437(1)
The Nature of ``Difficult-to-Resolve'' Negotiations and Why They Occur
437(10)
The Nature of Impasse
438(1)
What Causes Impasses and Intractable Negotiations?
438(1)
Characteristics of the Parties
439(4)
Characteristics of the Issues
443(1)
Characteristics of the Environment
443(1)
Characteristics of the Negotiation Setting
444(1)
Characteristics of the Conflict Resolution Processes
445(1)
Section Summary
446(1)
Fundamental Mistakes That Cause Impasses
447(1)
How to Resolve Impasses
448(16)
Agreement on the Rules and Procedures
449(1)
Reducing Tension and Synchronizing De-escalation
450(2)
Improving the Accuracy of Communication
452(3)
Controlling Issues
455(3)
Establishing Common Ground
458(4)
Enhancing the Desirability of Options to the Other Party
462(2)
Section Summary
464(1)
Chapter Summary
464(2)
Managing Negotiation Mismatches
466(16)
Introduction
466(1)
Managing the Shadow Negotiation and Social Contract
467(3)
Power Moves
468(1)
Process Moves
468(1)
Appreciative Moves
468(1)
Section Summary
468(2)
Responding to the Other Side's Hard Distributive Tactics
470(1)
Call Them on It
470(1)
Ignore Them
470(1)
Respond in Kind
470(1)
Offer to Change to More Productive Methods
470(1)
Section Summary
471(1)
Responding When the Other Side Has More Power
471(2)
The Special Problem of Handling Ultimatums
473(1)
Responding When the Other Side Is Being Difficult
474(6)
Ury's Breakthrough Approach
475(2)
Section Summary
477(1)
Responding to Difficult People
478(1)
Having Conversations with Difficult People
478(2)
Chapter Summary
480(2)
Managing Difficult Negotiations: Third-Party Approaches
482(35)
Adding Third Parties to the Two-Party Negotiation Process
482(5)
Benefits and Liabilities of Third-Party Intervention
483(1)
When Is Third-Party Involvement Appropriate?
484(1)
Which Type of Intervention Is Appropriate?
484(3)
Types of Third-Party Intervention
487(1)
Formal Intervention Methods
488(16)
Arbitration
488(3)
Mediation
491(9)
Process Consultation
500(3)
Combining Formal Intervention Methods
503(1)
Informal Intervention Methods
504(7)
Which Approach Is More Effective?
506(5)
Alternative Dispute Resolution Systems: When the Organization Is the Third Party
511(4)
Chapter Summary
515(2)
Part 7: Summary
Best Practices in Negotiations
517(10)
Be Prepared
517(1)
Diagnose the Fundamental Structure of the Negotiation
518(1)
Identify and Work the BATNA
519(1)
Be Willing to Walk Away
519(1)
Master the Key Paradoxes of Negotiation
520(2)
Claiming Value versus Creating Value
520(1)
Sticking by Your Principles versus Being Resilient to the Flow
520(1)
Sticking with the Strategy versus Opportunistic Pursuit of New Options
521(1)
Honest and Open versus Closed and Opaque
521(1)
Trust versus Distrust
522(1)
Remember the Intangibles
522(2)
Actively Manage Coalitions
524(1)
Savor and Protect Your Reputation
524(1)
Remember That Rationality and Fairness Are Relative
525(1)
Continue to Learn from Your Experience
525(2)
Bibliography 527(47)
Name Index 574(10)
Subject Index 584


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...