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New New Media

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780205865574

ISBN10:
0205865577
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
8/6/2012
Publisher(s):
Pearson
List Price: $46.80

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Summary

Discusses how "new new media" are transforming our culture Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Wikipedia, Foursquare, blogging … these and other "new new media" are used by hundreds of millions worldwide and are transforming just about every aspect of our culture from the way we elect presidents to how we watch television. New New Mediadetails the benefits, opportunities, and dangers of these transformations. New new media, as opposed to the traditional "new media" of email and websites, allow and encourage all consumers to become producers, readers to become writers and publishers, viewers to become performers - and have engendered such worldwide movements as The Arab Spring, The Tea Party, and Occupy Wall Street. This catalytic feature of contemporary media prompts an entirely new look at how mass media, culture, and industry are undergoing the most profound changes since the advent of the alphabet and the printing press. Learning Goals Upon completing this book, readers will be able to: Discuss the impact new new media have on our society Understand the mechanics of Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia and other types of new new media Discover the newest new media - Foursquare, Pinterest, WikiLeaks, Anonymous, Goggle+ Note:MySearchLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MySearchLab, please visit:www.mysearchlab.comor you can purchase a valuepack of the text + MySearchLab (at no additional cost): ValuePack ISBN-10: 0205912141 / ValuePack ISBN-13: 9780205912148

Author Biography

Paul Levinson, PhD, is Professor of Communication & Media Studies at Fordham University in New York City.  His eight nonfiction books, including The Soft Edge (1997), Digital McLuhan (1999), Realspace (2003), Cellphone (2004), and New New Media (2009; 2nd edition, 2012) have been the subject of major articles in the New York Times, Wired, and the Christian Science Monitor, and have been translated into ten languages.  His science fiction novels include The Silk Code (1999, winner of the Locus Award for Best First Novel), Borrowed Tides (2001), The Consciousness Plague (2002), The Pixel Eye (2003), and The Plot To Save Socrates (2006).  His short stories have been nominated for Nebula, Hugo, Edgar, and Sturgeon Awards.  Paul Levinson appears on "The O'Reilly Factor" (Fox News), "The CBS Evening News,"  "NewsHour with Jim Lehrer" (PBS),  "Nightline" (ABC), Dylan Ratigan (MSNBC) and numerous national and international TV and radio programs.  His 1972 LP, Twice Upon a Rhyme, was re-issued on mini-CD by Big Pink Records in 2009, and was re-issued in a vinyl remastered re-pressing by Sound of Salvation/Whiplash Records in December 2010.  He reviews the best of television in his InfiniteRegress.tv blog, writes political and media commentary for Mediaite, and was listed in The Chronicle of Higher Education's "Top 10 Academic Twitterers" in 2009.

Table of Contents

In this Section:

1) Brief Table of Contents

2) Full Table of Contents

 

1) Brief Table of Contents

 

Chapter 1: Why “New New” Media? 

Chapter 2: Facebook

Chapter 3: Twitter

Chapter 4: YouTube 

Chapter 5: Wikipedia 

Chapter 6: Blogging

Chapter 7: Foursquare and Hardware

Chapter 8: Smaller Potatoes

Chapter 9: The Dark Side Of New New Media

Chapter 10: Politics and New New Media

 


 2) Full Table of Contents

 

Chapter 1: Why “New New” Media?  

Why “New New” Rather Than Social Media?

Guiding Principles of New New Media

New New Media Encompass Prior New Media Principles

The Order and Content of the Chapters

Speed in the Evolution of New New Media and Hardware

The Prime Methodology: Learning by Doing

 

Chapter 2: Facebook

The Irresistible Appeal of “Friends”

What Does Online “Friendship” Mean

Fine-Tuning Online Friendship

The Facebook “Group” and its Evolution

Facebook Friends and Groups as Knowledge-Base Resources

Facebook Friends as Real-Time Knowledge Resources

Meeting Online Friends in the Real World

Reconnecting with Old Friends Online

Protection for the “Hidden Dimension”: Cleaning Up Your Online Pages

Subjective and Objective Differences Among New New Media

The Facebook Timeline

 

Chapter 3: Twitter

The Epitome of Immediacy

Interpersonal + Mass Communication = Twitter

Twitter as Smart T-Shirt or Jewelry

Google+, Twitter, Facebook, and Pownce

Twitter Dangers: The Congressman Who Tweeted Too Much

The Other Congressman Who Tweeted Too Much

Twitter vs. the Mullahs in Iran

McLuhan as Microblogger

 

Chapter 4: YouTube

“Obama Girl”

YouTube 2008 Presidential Primary Debates

Telegenic + YouTube = Cybergenic

YouTube Undeniability and Democracy

YouTube Usurps Television as a Herald of Public Events

YouTube Is Not Only Omni-Accessible and Free to Viewers - It’s Free to Producers

Obama as the New FDR in New New Media as Well as the New New Deal?

Amateur YouTube Stars and Producers

Viral Videos

Viral Videos Gone Bad

The YouTube Revolution in Popular Culture

Roy Orbison’s Guitar

“My Guitar Gently Weeps” Through the Ages

YouTube Retrieves MTV

Will YouTube Put iTunes Out of Business?

YouTube Refutes Lewis Mumford and Turns the Videoclip into a Transcript

Tim Russert, 1950–2008

YouTube’s Achilles’ Heel: Copyright

Comments as Verifiers on YouTube: The Fleetwoods

The Pope’s Channel

YouTube as International Information Liberator

 

Chapter 5: Wikipedia 

Pickles and Pericles

Inclusionists vs. Exclusionists: Battle Between Wikipedian Heroes

Neutrality of Editors and Conflicts of Interest

Identity Problems

All Wikipedians Are Equal, but Some Are More Equal Than Others

Transparency on Wikipedia Pages

Wikipedia vs. Britannica

Old vs. New New Media in Reporting the Death of Tim Russert

Wikipedia Wrongly Reports the “Deaths” of Ted Kennedy and Robert Byrd

Encyclopedia or Newspaper?

Does Wikipedia Make Libraries Unnecessary? 

The United Kingdom vs. Wikipedia

 

Chapter 6: Blogging

A Thumbnail History of Electronic Writing

Blogging About Anything, Forever

Comment Moderation

Commenting on the Blogs of Others

Comments as Correctors

MySpace Message from Stringer Bell of The Wire

Changing the Words in Your Blog After Publication

Long-Range Blogging and Linking

Group Blogging

Monetizing Your Blog

Is Monetization Incompatible with the Ideals of Blogging?

Dressing Up Your Blog with Images, Videos and Widgets

Gauging the Readership of Your Blog

Different Blogging Platforms

Are Bloggers Entitled to the Same First Amendment Protection as Old-Media Journalists?

Citizen Journalists, the First Amendment, and Occupy Wall Street

Bloggers and Lobbyists

Anonymity in Blogging

Blogging for Others

Changing the World with Your Blog

A Town Supervisor and His Blog

“Bloggers in Pajamas”

Further Tensions Between New New Media and Older Forms

The Need for Old-Media Reporting in an Age of New New Media Journalism

Old Media and New New Media Symbiosis: Easter Eggs for Lost and Fringe

 

Chapter 7: Foursquare and Hardware

Foursquare and iPhone

Check-Ins and Truths

Privacy and Location

The Inevitability of Mobile Media

The Necessity of Hardware

The Price of Mobility

The New New Media Exile of Useless Places

Smart Phones in the Car, in the Park, and in Bed

Batteries as the Weak Spot

iPhones, iPads, Bluetooth and Brains

 

Chapter 8: Smaller Potatoes

MySpace

Digg and Reddit

Second Life

Podcasting

 

Chapter 9: The Dark Side Of New New Media

Pre-New New Media Abuses: Bullying, Flaming, and Trolling

Online Gossiping and Cyberbullying

Cyberstalking

Tweeting and Terrorism

The Craigslist Bank Heist

Spam

Old Media Overreaction to New New Abuses: The Library vs. the Blogger

 

Chapter 10: Politics and New New Media

Barack Obama, New New Media, and the 2008 Election

The Tea Party and Twitter in 2010

The Arab Spring and Media Determinism

Occupy Wall Street and the Resurgence of Direct Democracy

The US Election of 2012



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