CART

(0) items

New Products Management,9780072961447
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

New Products Management

by ; ; ;
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780072961447

ISBN10:
0072961449
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/11/2005
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill/Irwin
List Price: $170.94

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$59.83

Buy New Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
N9780072961447
$164.10

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.01
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 8th edition with a publication date of 1/11/2005.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Related Products


  • New Products Management
    New Products Management
  • New Products Management
    New Products Management
  • New Products Management
    New Products Management
  • New Products Management
    New Products Management
  • New Products Management
    New Products Management




Summary

New Products Management provides future new product managers and team leaders with a complete toolkit for learning and executing the product development process. Students learn how real-world managers oversee effective strategy development, manage teams, evaluate ideas, and manage the technical and financial aspects of new product management. Book jacket.

Table of Contents

PART ONE OVERVIEW AND OPPORTUNITY IDENTIFICATION/SELECTION
3(76)
The Menu
5(18)
Setting
5(1)
Why Is This an Important Field of Study?
6(3)
What's Special about This Field, from the Student's Viewpoint?
9(2)
OK, So What Is a New Product, and What Leads to Success?
11(3)
What about New Services, Business-to-Business Products, and International Products?
14(1)
On What Basic Ideas or Concepts Is This Field of Activity Built?
15(2)
Don't Most Real Innovations Come from Small Firms and Inventors?
17(1)
Is New Products Management an Art or a Science?
17(1)
Does This Field of Activity Have a Unique Vocabulary?
18(1)
Does the Field of New Products Offer Careers?
18(1)
Given All of This, What Will We Be Doing in This Book?
19(1)
Does All This Actually Work?
20(1)
Summary
21(1)
Applications
21(2)
The New Products Process
23(29)
Setting
23(1)
The Highlighter Saga
23(3)
What Happened in That Saga?
25(1)
The Basic New Products Process
26(7)
Phase 1: Opportunity Identification and Selection
28(1)
Phase 2: Concept Generation
29(1)
Phase 3: Concept/Project Evaluation
30(1)
Phase 4: Development
31(1)
Phase 5: Launch
32(1)
The Concept Life Cycle
33(2)
Speeding the Product to Market
35(5)
Techniques for Speeding Time to Market
35(3)
Risks and Guidelines in Speeding to Market
38(2)
What about New Services?
40(2)
What about New-to-the-World Products?
42(3)
Closing Thoughts about the New Products Process
45(1)
Summary
46(1)
Applications
46(1)
Case: Tastykake Sensables
47(2)
Case: Merck
49(3)
Opportunity Identification and Selection: Strategic Planning for New Products
52(27)
Setting
52(1)
Why Have Strategic Planning?
52(1)
A Strategy for a ``Company within a Company''
53(1)
New Product Strategy Inputs
53(7)
Product Platform Planning
54(4)
Opportunity Identification
58(1)
Noncorporate Strategic Planning
59(1)
Miscellaneous Sources
59(1)
The Product Innovation Charter
60(8)
Background Section of the PIC
62(1)
The Arena (Area of Focus) Section of the PIC
63(2)
Goals and Objectives Section of the PIC
65(1)
Special Guidelines Section of the PIC
66(2)
A Word on How to Prepare a Product Innovation Charter
68(3)
The New Product's Strategic Fit
71(2)
Summary
73(1)
Applications
73(1)
Case: New Product Strategy at Kellogg
74(2)
Case: Microsoft Windows 95
76(3)
PART TWO CONCEPT GENERATION
79(84)
Preparation and Alternatives
81(21)
Setting
81(1)
Preparation
81(7)
The Product Innovation Charter
81(1)
Finding the Right People
82(2)
Management's Role in Making Creative People Productive
84(1)
Activities to Encourage Creativity
84(2)
Special Rewards
86(1)
The Removal of Roadblocks
87(1)
The Concept
88(6)
The Designer Decaf Example
91(1)
The Concept Statement
92(2)
Two Basic Approaches
94(1)
Important Sources of Ready-Made New Product Ideas
95(3)
Summary
98(1)
Applications
99(1)
Case: Concept Generation in the Toy Industry
100(2)
Problem-Based Ideation: Finding and Solving Customers' Problems
102(23)
Setting
102(1)
The Overall System of Internal Concept Generation
102(2)
Gathering the Problems
104(12)
Internal Records
104(1)
Direct Inputs from Technical and Marketing Departments
104(1)
Problem Analysis
105(1)
The General Procedure
106(2)
Methodologies to Use
108(4)
Scenario Analysis
112(4)
Solving the Problems
116(4)
Group Creativity
117(1)
Brainstorming
117(1)
Electronic Brainstorming and Computer-Assisted Creativity Techniques
118(1)
Disciplines Panel
119(1)
Concept Generation Techniques in Action
119(1)
Summary
120(1)
Applications
120(1)
Case: Campbell's IQ Meals
121(2)
Case: Earning Organizational Respect
123(2)
Analytical Attribute Approaches: Introduction and Perceptual Mapping
125(17)
Setting
125(1)
Understanding Why Customers Buy a Product
125(2)
Products Are Groups of Attributes
125(2)
Analyzing Product Attributes for Concept Generation and Evaluation
127(1)
Gap Analysis
127(12)
Determinant Gap Maps
128(1)
Perceptual Gap Maps Based on Attribute Ratings (AR)
129(6)
Perceptual Gap Maps Based on Overall Similarities (OS)
135(3)
Comments on Gap Analysis
138(1)
Summary
139(1)
Applications
139(1)
Case: Dell Computers (A)
140(2)
Analytical Attribute Approaches: Trade-Off Analysis and Qualitative Techniques
142(21)
Setting
142(1)
Trade-off Analysis
142(8)
Using Trade-off Analysis to Generate Concepts
143(2)
A Conjoint Analysis Application
145(3)
Recent Modifications in Conjoint Analysis
148(2)
Virtual Prototypes in Concept Testing
150(1)
Qualitative Techniques
150(1)
Dimensional Analysis
151(1)
Checklists
152(1)
Relationships Analysis
153(4)
About the Dimensions Used in Relationships Analysis
153(1)
Two-Dimensional Matrix
154(1)
Morphological or Multidimensional Matrix
155(2)
Analogy
157(1)
Summary
157(1)
Applications
158(1)
Case: Rubbermaid Inc.
159(4)
PART THREE CONCEPT/PROJECT EVALUATION
163(114)
The Concept Evaluation System
165(20)
Setting
165(1)
What's Going on in the New Products Process?
165(4)
The Evaluation System for the Basic New Products Process
166(2)
Product Line Considerations in Concept Evaluation
168(1)
The Cumulative Expenditures Curve
169(3)
The Risk/Payoff Matrix
170(1)
The Decay Curve
171(1)
Planning the Evaluation System
172(3)
Everything Is Tentative
172(2)
Potholes
174(1)
The People Dimension
174(1)
Surrogates
175(1)
The A-T-A-R Model
175(5)
Where Do We Get the Figures for the A-T-A-R Model?
179(1)
Further Uses of the A-T-A-R Model
180(1)
Summary
181(1)
Applications
181(1)
Case: Concept Development Corporation
182(1)
Case: The G5 Doll
183(2)
Concept Testing
185(26)
Setting
185(1)
The Importance of Up-Front Evaluations
185(1)
The Product Innovation Charter
186(1)
Market Analysis
187(1)
Initial Reaction
187(1)
Concept Testing and Development
188(5)
What Is a New Product Concept?
191(1)
The Purposes of Concept Testing
191(2)
Considerations in Concept Testing Research
193(7)
Prepare the Concept Statement
193(4)
Define the Respondent Group
197(1)
Select the Response Situation
198(1)
Prepare the Interviewing Sequence
199(1)
Variations
199(1)
Analyzing Research Results
200(4)
Identifying Benefit Segments
200(1)
Joint Space Maps
201(3)
Conjoint Analysis in Concept Testing
204(2)
Conclusions
206(1)
Summary
206(1)
Applications
207(1)
Case: Wolverine Car Wash
208(1)
Case: Dell Computers (B)
209(2)
The Full Screen
211(19)
Setting
211(1)
Purposes of the Full Screen
211(2)
The Scoring Model
213(13)
Introductory Concept
213(2)
The Procedure
215(5)
Profile Sheet
220(1)
A Screening Model Based on Project NewProd
220(3)
The Analytic Hierarchy Process
223(2)
Special Aspects
225(1)
Summary
226(1)
Applications
226(1)
Case: Wilson Sporting Goods (A)
227(3)
Sales Forecasting and Financial Analysis
230(26)
Setting
230(1)
Sales Forecasting for New Products
231(6)
Forecasting Sales Using Purchase Intentions
233(1)
Forecasting Sales Using the A-T-A-R Model
233(1)
Techniques for Forecasting Product Diffusion
234(3)
Observations on Forecasting Models
237(1)
Problems with Sales Forecasting
237(2)
Summary of the Problems
239(1)
Actions by Managers to Handle These Problems
239(6)
Improve the New Product Process Currently in Use
239(1)
Use the Life Cycle Concept of Financial Analysis
240(1)
Reduce Dependence on Poor Forecasts
241(4)
Return to the PIC
245(2)
Summary
247(1)
Applications
248(1)
Case: Bay City Electronics
248(1)
Bay City Appendix: Financial Analysis for New Products
249(7)
Compiling the Key Data
253(3)
Product Protocol
256(21)
Setting
256(1)
Review
256(2)
Purposes of the Protocol
258(2)
Protocol's Specific Contents
260(7)
Target Market
260(2)
Positioning
262(1)
Product Attributes
262(2)
Competitive Comparisons and Augmentation Dimensions
264(1)
Marketing Requirements
265(1)
Other Components of the Product Protocol
265(1)
An Example of Requirements
266(1)
Protocol and Quality Function Deployment (QFD)
267(5)
QFD and the House of Quality
267(3)
Outcomes of QFD
270(2)
Some Warnings about the Difficulty of the Protocol Process
272(1)
Summary
273(1)
Applications
273(1)
Case: Wilson Sporting Goods (B)
274(3)
PART FOUR DEVELOPMENT
277(80)
Design
281(22)
Setting
281(1)
What Is Design?
281(1)
The Role of Design in the New Products Process
282(5)
Contributions of Design to New Product Goals
282(5)
Product Architecture
287(2)
A Process for Product Architecture
287(1)
Product Architecture and Product Platforms
288(1)
Industrial Design and the Industrial Designer
289(2)
Prototype Development
291(1)
Managing the Interfaces in the Design Process
291(3)
Improving the Interfaces in the Design Process
294(4)
Computer-Aided Design and Design for Manufacturability
296(2)
Continuous Improvement in Design
298(1)
Summary
298(1)
Applications
299(1)
Case: The MINI
299(2)
Case: Gillette MACH3
301(2)
Development Team Management
303(29)
Setting
303(1)
What Is a Team?
303(1)
Structuring the Team
304(5)
Another Look at Projectization
307(1)
Choosing an Organizational Option
307(2)
Building a Team
309(8)
Establishing a Culture of Collaboration
310(1)
The Team Assignment and Ownership
310(2)
Selecting the Leader
312(1)
Selecting the Team Members
312(2)
Roles and Participants
314(2)
Network Building
316(1)
Training the Teams
317(1)
Managing the Team
317(7)
Cross-Functional Interface Management
319(2)
Overcoming Barriers to Market Orientation
321(1)
Ongoing Management of the Team
322(1)
Team Compensation and Motivation
322(2)
Closing the Team Down
324(1)
Managing Globally Dispersed Teams
324(3)
Summary
327(1)
Applications
327(1)
Case: Marko Products
328(2)
Case: Ford Mondeo
330(2)
Product Use Testing
332(25)
Setting
332(1)
The Role of Marketing during Development
333(2)
Marketing Is Involved from the Beginning of the Process
333(1)
Marketing Ramp-Up, or the ``I Think We've Got It'' Phase
334(1)
Why Do Product Use Testing?
335(1)
Is Product Use Testing Really Necessary?
335(5)
Are These Arguments Correct?
336(4)
Knowledge Gained from Product Use Testing
340(4)
Decisions in Product Use Testing
344(7)
Who Should Be in the User Group?
344(1)
How Should We Reach the User Group?
345(1)
Should We Disclose Our Identity?
345(1)
How Much Explanation Should We Provide?
346(1)
How Much Control over Product Use Should There Be?
346(1)
How Should the Test Be Conducted?
347(1)
Over What Time Period Should the Test Be Conducted?
348(1)
What Should Be the Source of the Product Being Tested?
348(1)
What Should Be the Form of the Product Being Tested?
349(1)
How Should We Record Respondents' Reactions?
349(2)
How Should We Interpret the Figures We Get?
351(1)
Who Should Do the Product Use Test?
351(1)
Special Problems
351(1)
Summary
352(1)
Applications
352(1)
Case: Product Use Testing for New Consumer Nondurables
353(4)
PART FIVE LAUNCH
357(133)
Strategic Launch Planning
360(33)
Setting
360(1)
The Strategic Givens
361(1)
Revisiting the Strategic Goals
362(1)
Strategic Platform Decisions
363(4)
Type of Demand Sought
363(1)
Permanence
364(1)
Aggressiveness
364(1)
Competitive Advantage
365(1)
Product Line Replacement
365(1)
Competitive Relationship
366(1)
Scope of Market Entry
367(1)
Image
367(1)
The Target Market Decision
367(6)
Alternative Ways to Segment a Market
367(1)
Micromarketing and Mass Customization
368(3)
Targeting May Also Use Diffusion of Innovation
371(2)
Product Positioning
373(3)
Creating Unique Value for the Chosen Target
376(1)
Branding and Brand Management
377(9)
Trademarks and Registration
377(2)
What Is a Good Brand Name?
379(2)
Managing Brand Equity
381(2)
Brand Name Dilution
383(1)
Brand Profitability
384(1)
Global Brand Leadership
385(1)
Packaging
386(1)
The Role of Packaging
386(1)
The Packaging Decision
387(1)
Summary
387(1)
Applications
388(1)
Case: Iridium
389(1)
Case: The 7-Eleven Frito Pie
390(2)
Case: Dell Computers (C)
392(1)
Implementation of the Strategic Plan
393(21)
Setting
393(1)
The Launch Cycle
393(4)
Prelaunch and Preannouncement
393(3)
Announcement, Beachhead, and Early Growth
396(1)
Launch Tactics
397(4)
The Communications Plan
398(1)
The Copy Strategy Statement
399(1)
Personal Selling
400(1)
Alliances
401(1)
A-T-A-R Requirements
401(7)
Awareness
401(1)
Stocking and Availability
402(2)
Trial
404(4)
Repeat Purchase
408(1)
Summary
408(1)
Applications
408(1)
Case: Spiralloy Inc.
409(2)
Case: The Advanced Photo System (APS)
411(3)
Market Testing
414(29)
Setting
414(1)
The Market Testing Decision
414(5)
When Is the Decision Made?
415(1)
Is This an Easy Decision to Make?
415(1)
The Factors for Deciding Whether to Market Test
416(3)
Methods of Market Testing
419(1)
Pseudo Sale
419(1)
Controlled Sale
419(1)
Full Sale
420(1)
Pseudo Sale Methods
420(5)
Speculative Sale
421(1)
Simulated Test Market
422(3)
Controlled Sale Methods
425(5)
Informal Selling
425(1)
Direct Marketing
426(1)
Minimarkets
426(2)
Scanner Market Testing
428(2)
Full Sale Methods
430(7)
Test Marketing
430(3)
The Rollout
433(4)
Wrap-up on Market Testing Methodologies
437(1)
Summary
438(1)
Applications
438(1)
Case: PepsiCo---Pepsi-Kona and Pepsi One
439(2)
Case: Square D Remote Lamp Dimmer
441(2)
Launch Management
443(22)
Setting
443(1)
What We Mean by Launch Management
443(12)
The Launch Management System
444(1)
Step One: Spot Potential Problems
445(4)
Step Two: Select the Control Events
449(1)
Step Three: Develop Contingency Plans
450(1)
Step Four: Design the Tracking System
451(4)
A Sample Launch Management Plan
455(1)
Objections to Launch Management
455(2)
No Launch Management on Temporary Products
457(1)
Product Failure
457(3)
Summary
460(1)
Applications
460(1)
Case: Levitra
461(2)
Case: Interfoods Inc.: Valley Butter
463(2)
Public Policy Issues
465(25)
Setting
465(1)
Bigger Picture: A Cycle of Concerns
465(2)
Phase I: Stirring
465(1)
Phase II: Trial Support
465(2)
Phase III: The Political Arena
467(1)
Phase IV: Regulatory Adjustment
467(1)
Business Attitudes toward Product Issues
467(1)
Current Problem Areas
468(1)
Product Liability
469(6)
Typology of Injury Sources
470(1)
The Four Legal Bases for Product Liability
471(2)
Other Legislation
473(1)
Planning for the Product Recall
474(1)
Attempts at Standardization and Clarification
475(1)
Environmental Needs
475(2)
The Managerial Dilemma
475(2)
Product Piracy
477(2)
Worthy Products
479(1)
Morality
479(1)
Monopoly
480(1)
Personal Ethics
480(2)
The Underlying Residual Issues
482(1)
What Are New Products Managers Doing about All This?
483(1)
Strategy and Policy
483(1)
Control Systems
483(1)
Product Testing
483(1)
Marketing and Market Testing
483(1)
Customer Education and External Affairs
484(1)
Summary
484(1)
Applications
484(1)
Case: Hybrid Vehicles at General Motors
485(2)
Case: Napster, The iPod, and Music Downloading
487(3)
Bibliography 490(5)
Appendix A Sources of Ideas Already Generated 495(6)
Appendix B Other Techniques of Concept Generation 501(10)
Appendix C Small's Ideation Stimulator Checklist 511(6)
Appendix D The Marketing Plan 517(6)
Appendix E Guidelines for Evaluating a New Products Program 523(4)
Index 527


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...