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New Worlds: An Introduction to College Reading,9780073513508
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New Worlds: An Introduction to College Reading

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Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780073513508

ISBN10:
0073513504
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
2/1/2013
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McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages
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Summary

CONNECT READING provides a personalized learning plan for each student, continually developed and refined as students achieve mastery.  Each student plan is created through an individualized diagnostic that evaluates skills from 7th-grade level through college-readiness, for second-language learners, international students, adult students, and traditional high-schoolers.  Offered completely online, CONNECT READING can be used in conjunction with NEW WORLDS or OPENING DOORS, which provide a printed experience that teaches critical reading skills through close reading of anthologized chapters from best-selling undergraduate texts in Psychology, Sociology, Business, and more.

Table of Contents

* - New reading selections

To the Instructor

To the Student

PART ONE: A NEW WORLD OF LEARNING: READING AND STUDYING IN COLLEGE

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO READING AND STUDYING: BEING SUCCESSFUL IN COLLEGE

NEW INFORMATION AND SKILLS

What do you need to know about the reading and studying process?

What are the keys to studying college textbooks?

What is comprehension monitoring and why is it important?

How can you be selective as you read and study?

How can you organize as you read and study?

How can you rehearse information to remember it?

What is the SQ3R study system?

How can you adjust your reading rates when you study?

How can you improve your reading speed?

What do you need to do to be successful in college?

Why is it important to set goals?

What are learning preferences?

Chapter Review Cards

How can you find information online?

READINGS

Selection 1-1: "A Mother's Answer" from The Big Picture: Getting Perspective on What's Really Important" by Ben Carson and Gregg Lewis (Nonfiction)

*Selection 1-2: "Fire Up Your Memory with Proven Strategies!" from Peak Performance: Success in College and Beyond" by Sharon Ferrett(Student Success)

*Selection 1-3: "The When and How of Preparing for Tests" from P.O.W.E.R. Learning: Strategies for Success in College and Life by Robert S. Feldman(Study Skills)

CHAPTER 2: DEVELOPING A COLLEGE-LEVEL VOCABULARY: A NEW WORLD OF WORDS

NEW INFORMATION AND SKILLS

Why is it important to develop a college-level vocabulary?

What are context clues and how do you use them?

What are word-structure clues and how do you use them?

How do you use a dictionary pronunciation key?

What is figurative language and how do you interpret figures of speech?

Other things to keep in mind when developing your college-level vocabulary.

The most common and helpful roots, prefixes, and suffixes in English come from Latin and ancient Greek.

A word’s etymology (origin and history) indicates the word parts it was created from, including Latin or

Certain punctuation marks in a sentence can signal a definition.

Chapter Review Cards

Test Your Understanding: Using Context Clues, Part 1

Test Your Understanding: Using Context Clues, Part 2

Test Your Understanding: Using Word-Structure Clues, Part 1

Test Your Understanding: Using Word-Structure Clues, Part 2

Test Your Understanding: Interpreting Figurative Language, Part 1

Test Your Understanding: Interpreting Figurative Language, Part 2

READINGS

*Selection 2-1: "Overwhelming Obstacles" from Peak Performance: Success in College and Beyond by Sharon Ferrett (Student Suscess>

*Selection 2-2: "Autism: A Public Health Emergency" from selected Internet Sources (Public Health)

*Selection 2-3: "Thinking in Pictures: Autism and Visual Thought" from Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism by Temple Grandin

PART TWO: A NEW WORLD OF UNDERSTANDING: USING CORE COMPREHENSION SKILLS WHEN YOU READ COLLEGE TEXTBOOKS

CHAPTER 3: DETERMINING THE TOPIC

What is the topic of a paragraph, and why is it important?

What are the clues for determining the topic of a paragraph?

Clue 1: Look for a Heading or Title That Indicates the Topic

Clue 2: Look for a Word, Name, or Phrase in the Paragraph That Appears in Special Print

Clue 3: Look for a Word, Name, or Phrase That Is Repeated throughout the Paragraph

Clue 4: Look for a Word, Name, or Phrase Referred to throughout the Paragraph by Pronouns or Other Words

Other things to keep in mind when determining the topic

You should use a name, word, or phrase, but never a sentence, to express the topic. This means you must know the difference between a phrase and a sentence.

You must know the difference between “general” and specific.”

A longer passage has an overall topic.

Checkpoint: Determining the Topic

Chapter Review Cards

Test Your Understanding, Determining the Topic, Part One

Test Your Understanding: Determining the Topic, Part Two READINGS

*Selection 3-1: "Parenting Style: Does it Matter?" from Human Development by Diane Papalia, Sally Olds, and Ruth Feldman (Human Development)

Selection 3-2: "Giving a Speech? If You’re Nervous, You’re Normal!" from Public Speaking for College and Career by Hamilton Gregory (Speech Communication)

*Selection 3-3: "State-of-the-Art and High-Tech Ways of Dealth" from Understanding Your Health by Wayne Payne, Dale Hahn, and Ellen Lucas(Health)

CHAPTER 4: LOCATING THE STATED MAIN IDEA

NEW INFORMATION AND SKILLS

What is a stated main idea sentence, and why is it important?

What is the method for identifying the stated main idea sentence?

Which sentence in a paragraph can be the stated main idea sentence?

First Sentence of the Paragraph

Last Sentence of the Paragraph

A Sentence within the Paragraph

Other things to keep in mind when locating the stated main idea sentence

All stated main idea sentences have certain characteristics in common.

Avoid these three common mistakes when locating the stated main idea

Signal words or phrases can help you locate a stated main idea and locate a stated main idea that ispresented as a conclusion.

A longer passage often has an overall main idea that is stated, too.

Checkpoint: Locating the Stated Main Idea

Chapter Review Cards

Test Your Understanding: Locating the Stated Main Idea, Part One

Test Your Understanding: Locating the Stated Main Idea, Part Two

Readings

*Selection 4-1: "Who's the Boss? Leaders, Managers, and Leadership Style" from Understanding Business" by William Nickels, James McHugh, and Susan McHugh (Business)

*Selection 4-2: "Arranged Marriage: Adventures and Changes" from Marriages and Families: Intimacy, Diversity, and Strengths by David Olson, John DeFrain, and Linda Skogrand (Marriage and Family)

*Selection 4-3: "Concussions: Don't Shrug them Off" from Selected internet sources (Health)

CHAPTER 5: FORMULATING AN IMPLIED MAIN IDEA

NEW INFORMATION AND SKILLS

What is an implied main idea, and why is it important?

Three formulas for using information in a paragraph to formulate an implied main idea

Formula 1: Add an Essential Word or Phrase to a Sentence in the Paragraph That Almost States the Main Idea

Formula 2: Combine Two Sentences from the Paragraph into a Single Sentence

Formula 3: Summarize Important Ideas into One Sentence or Write One Sentence That Gives a General Inference Based on the Details

Other Things to Keep in Mind When Formulating an Implied Main Idea Sentence

You must always use a sentence—not just a phrase—to express a formulated main idea. This means you must know the difference between a sentence and a phrase.

All formulated (implied) main idea sentences have certain characteristics.

A longer passage often has an implied overall main idea that you must formulate, too.

Checkpoint: Formulating an Implied Main Idea

Chapter Review Cards

Test Your Understanding: Formulating an Implied Main Idea, Part One

Test Your Undersanding: Formulating an Implied Main Idea, Part Two

READINGS

Selection 5-1: Two Artistic Tributes: The Vietnam Memorial and the AIDS Quilt from Living with Art by Rita Gilbert(Art Appreciation)

*Selection 5-2: "Companies Struggle with 'Inside Jobs' and Outside Threats" from Management Information Systems for the Information Age by Stephen Haag and Maeve Cummings (Management Information Systems)

Selection 5-3: "Avian Flu: A Coming Pandemic?" from Biology by Sylvia Mader (Biology)

CHAPTER 6: IDENTIFYING SUPPORTING DETAILS

NEW INFORMATION AND SKILLS

What are supporting details, and why are they important?

What is the method for identifying supporting details?

Major and minor details

Other Things to Keep in Mind When Identifying Supporting Details

Watch for clues that indicate a list of details.

Avoid overmarking your textbook by numbering the supporting details in a paragraph rather than highlighting or underlining them.

Listing the details on separate lines in your study notes or on review cards can help you learn the information more efficiently.

Checkpoint: Identifying Supporting Details

Chapter Review Cards

Test Your Understanding: Identifying Supporting Details, Part One

Test Your Understanding: Identifying Supporting Details, Part Two

READINGS

Selection 6-1: "Hold It! You Can Recycle That! Recycling: A Twenty-First Century Necessity" from Environmental Science: A Study of Interdependence by Eldon Enger and Bradley Smith (Environmental Science)

Selection 6-2: "The Life of Buddha" from The 100: A Ranking of the 100 Most Important People in History by Michael Hart (History)

Selection 6-3: "The New Immigrants: Asian Americans and Latinos from Nations to Nations: A Narrative History of the American Republic by James Davidson et al.(History)

CHAPTER 7: RECOGNIZING AUTHORS' WRITING PATTERNS

NEW INFORMATION AND SKILLS

What are authors' writing patterns and why are they important?

Transition words that signal the relationship of ideas within sentences and between sentences

Five Common Writing Patterns

Definition pattern

List pattern

Sequence pattern

Comparison-contrast pattern

Cause-effect pattern

Additional Paragraph Patterns

Definition and Example Pattern

Generalization and Example Pattern

Location or Spatial Order Pattern

Summary Pattern

Classification Pattern

Addition Pattern

Statement and Clarification Pattern

Other things to keep in mind when recognizing authors' writing patterns

Lists and sequences differ in an important way.

Avoid identifying every paragraph as having a list pattern.

Authors often mix patterns in the same paragraph.

A longer selection may contain several patterns and have an overall pattern as well.

Checkpoint: Recognizing Authors' Writing Patterns

Chapter Review Cards

Test Your Understanding: Recognizing Authors’ Writing Patterns, Part One

Test Your Understanding: Recognizing Authors’ Writing Patterns, Part Two

Reading Selections:

*Selection 7-1: "Viruses: Easily Spread and Ever Evolving" from Connect Core Concepts in Health by Paul Insel and Walton Roth (Health)

Selection 7-2: The Right to Vote: Valued but Under Utilized from We the People: A Concise Introduction to American Politics by Thomas E. Patterson(Government)

*Selection 7-3: "Are you Shopping Smart?" from Personal Finance by Jack Kapoor, Les Dlabay, and Robert Hughes

PART THREE: A NEW WORLD OF READING AND THINKING CRITICALLY

CHAPTER 8: READING CRITICALLY

NEW INFORMATION AND SKILLS

What is critical reading, and why is it important?

What is author’s point of view, and how can you determine it?

What is author’s purpose, and how can you determine it?

What is author’s intended audience, and how can you determine it?

What is author's tone and how can you determine it?

Other things to keep in mind when reading critically

You should avoid seeing the purpose of everything you read as to inform.

If the author’s purpose is to persuade you to adopt his or her point of view, you should determine whichside of an issue he or she favors.

Understanding the author’s tone will enable you to grasp the true or intended meaning, even when theauthor’s words may appear to be saying something different.

There are two forms of irony: irony in tone and irony in situations.

Sarcasm and irony are not the same thing.

Checkpoint: Reading Critically

Chapter Review Cards

Testing Your Understanding: Reading Critically, Part One

Testing Your Understanding: Reading Critically, Part Two

READINGS

Selection 8-1: From For One More Day by Mitch Albom(Literature)

Selection 8-2: "I Never Made It to the NFL" from The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch with Jeffrey Zaslow(Memoir)

Selection 8-3: "Dispelling the Myths about Millionaires" from Understanding Business by William Nickels, James McHugh, and Susan McHugh (Personal Business)

CHAPTER 9: THINKING CRITICALLY

NEW INFORMATION AND SKILLS

What is thinking critically, and why is it important?

What are facts and opinions, and why is it important to be able to distinguish between them?

What are inferences, and why is it important to make them?

Other things to keep in mind when thinking critically

Facts and opinions may or may not appear together.

Authors sometimes present opinions in such a way that they appear to be facts.

There are other critical thinking skills, such as recognizing propaganda devices and recognizing fallacies, that can also be used to evaluate written material.

Checkpoint: Thinking Critically

Chapter Review Cards

Test Your Understanding: Thinking Critically: Fact and Opinion
Test Your Understanding: Thinking Critically: Making Logical Inferences

READINGSb>

*Selection 9-1: "Taboos and Myths about Conflict and Anger" from Marriages and Families: Intimacy, Diversity, and Strengths by George Johnson (Marriage and Family)

Selection 9-2: "Planet Under Stress: Curbing Population Growth" from The Living World: Basic Concepts by George Johnson (Biology)

*Selection 9-3: "For Better or Worse: Divorce" from Human Development by Diane Papalia, Sally Olds, and Ruth Feldman (Human Development)

PART FOUR: A NEW WORLD OF STUDYING: EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT STUDY TECHNIQUES

CHAPTER 10: APPROACHING COLLEGE READING AND STUDYING

NEW INFORMATION AND SKILLS

What is the three-step process for studying college textbooks?

Step 1: Prepare to Read

Step 2: Ask and Answer Questions to Guide Your Reading

Step 3: Review by Rehearsing Your Answers

What are textbook features?

Chapter Introductions and Chapter Objectives

Chapter Outlines

Vocabulary Aids and Glossaries

Boxes

Chapter Summaries

Study Questions and Activities

Other Textbook features

How can you interpret visuals and graphic aids?

How can you interpret visual aids?

Photographs

Diagrams

Maps

Cartoons

How can you interpret graphic aids?

Line graphs

Pie charts

Bar graphs

Flowcharts

Tables

Other things to keep in mind when studying textbook material.

You will benefit from examining the features in all of your textbooks at the beginning of the semester.

Chapter Review Cards

Test Your Understanding: Interpreting Graphic Aids

READING

Selection 10-1: "Living with Stress" from P.O.W.E.R. Learning: Strategies for Success in College and Life by Robert Feldman (Student Success)

CHAPTER 11: PREPARING FOR TESTS: STUDY-READING, REHEARSAL, AND MEMORY

NEW INFORMATION AND SKILLS

How are rehearsal and memory related?

How can you underline, highlight, and annotate your textbooks?

How can you take notes from textbooks?

Guidelines for Outlining

Guidelines for Mapping

Guidelines for Summarizing

Guidelines for following directions

Other things to keep in mind as you prepare for tests by applying

Core Comprehension Skills

When you study, choose the study techniques (underlining, highlighting, annotating, outlining, mapping, summarizing, making review cards or test review sheets) that (a) are appropriate to the type of material you are studying, (b) correspond with how you will e tested on the material, and (c) best suit your learning style.

Learn how to handle outline, summary, and mapped notes questions on standardized reading tests.

Chapter Review Cards

READING

Selection 11-1: "Information Technology, The Internet, and You" from Computing Essentials by Timothy O'Leary and Linda O'Leary (Information Technology)

ESSENTIAL SKILLS REVIEW TESTS

Introduction to Essential Skills Review Tests

Essential Skills Review Test 1

Essential Skills Review Test 2

Essential Skills Review Test 3

Essential Skills Review Test 4

Essential Skills Review Test 5

Essential Skills Review Test 6

Essential Skills Review Test 7

Essential Skills Review Test 8

Essential Skills Review Test 9

Essential Skills Review Test 10

Appendix 1 Glossary of Key Terms

Appendix 2 Master Vocabulary List

INDEX

Instructor's Guide



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