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Nicomachean Ethics : Aristotle

by
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9780023895302

ISBN10:
0023895306
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/1962
Publisher(s):
Pearson

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Summary

Enduringly profound treatise, whose lasting effect on Western philosophy continues to resonate. Aristotle identifies the goal of life as happiness and discusses its attainment through the contemplation of philosophic truth.

Table of Contents

Introduction xi
Bibliography xxv
Note on the Text xxvii
NICOMACHEAN ETHICS
Book One
3(30)
The good as the aim of action
3(1)
Politics as the master science of the good
4(1)
The limitations of ethics and politics
5(1)
Happiness is the good, but many views are held about it
6(2)
Various views on the highest good
8(1)
Plato's view of the Good
9(5)
The good is final and self-sufficient; happiness is defined
14(5)
Popular views about happiness confirm our position
19(3)
How happiness is acquired
22(1)
Can a man be called ``happy'' during his lifetime?
23(3)
Do the fortunes of the living affect the dead?
26(1)
The praise accorded to happiness
27(2)
The psychological foundations of the virtues
29(4)
Book Two
33(19)
Moral virtue as the result of habits
33(2)
Method in the practical sciences
35(1)
Pleasure and pain as the test of virtue
36(2)
Virtuous action and virtue
38(2)
Virtue defined: the genus
40(1)
Virtue defined: the differentia
41(3)
Examples of the mean in particular virtues
44(4)
The relation between the mean and its extremes
48(1)
How to attain the mean
49(3)
Book Three
52(31)
Actions voluntary and involuntary
52(6)
Choice
58(2)
Deliberation
60(3)
Wish
63(1)
Man as responsible agent
64(4)
Courage and its sphere of operation
68(2)
Courage: its nature and its opposites
70(2)
Qualities similar to courage
72(4)
Courage: its relation to pleasure and pain
76(1)
Self-control and its sphere of operation
77(2)
Self-control: its nature and its opposites
79(2)
Self-indulgence
81(2)
Book Four
83(28)
Generosity, extravagance, and stinginess
83(6)
Magnificence, vulgarity, and niggardliness
89(4)
High-mindedness, pettiness, and vanity
93(6)
Ambition and lack of ambition as the extremes of a nameless virtue
99(1)
Gentleness, short temper, and apathy
100(2)
Friendliness, obsequiousness, and grouchiness
102(2)
Truthfulness, boastfulness, and self-depreciation
104(3)
Wittiness, buffoonery, and boorishness
107(2)
Shame and shamelessness
109(2)
Book Five
111(35)
The different kinds of justice; complete justice
111(4)
Partial justice: just action as distribution and as rectification
115(3)
Just action as fairness in distribution
118(2)
Just action as rectification
120(3)
Just action as reciprocity in the economic life of the state
123(6)
What is just in the political sense
129(2)
Just by nature and just by convention
131(2)
The various degrees of responsibility for just and unjust action
133(3)
Voluntariness and involuntariness in just and unjust action and suffering
136(5)
Equity and the equitable
141(5)
Is it possible to be unjust toward oneself?
Book Six
146(28)
Moral and intellectual excellence; the psychological foundations of intellectual excellence
146(1)
The two kinds of intellectual excellence and their objects
147(3)
The qualities by which truth is attained: (a) pure science or knowledge
150(1)
(b) Art of applied science
151(1)
Practical wisdom
152(2)
(d) Intelligence
154(1)
(e) Theoretical wisdom
155(3)
Practical wisdom and politics
158(3)
Practical wisdom and excellence in deliberation
161(3)
Practical wisdom andunderstanding
164(1)
Practical wisdom and good sense
165(2)
The use of theoretical and practical wisdom
167(3)
Practical wisdom and moral virtue
170(4)
Book Seven
174(40)
Moral strength and moral weakness: their relation to virtue and vice and current beliefs about them
174(2)
Problems in the current beliefs about moral strength and moral weakness
176(4)
Some problems solved: moral weakness and knowledge
180(5)
More problems solved: the sphere in which moral weakness operates
185(4)
Moral weakness and brutishness
189(2)
Moral weakness in anger
191(3)
Moral strength and moral weakness: tenacity and softness
194(3)
Moral weakness and self-indulgence
197(2)
Steadfastness in moral strength and moral weakness
199(2)
Moral weakness and practical wisdom
201(2)
Pleasure: some current views
203(2)
The views discussed: Is pleasure a good thing?
205(3)
The views discussed: Is pleasure the highest good?
208(2)
The views discussed: Are most pleasures bad?
210(4)
Book Eight
214(31)
Why we need friendship
214(3)
The three things worthy of affection
217(1)
The three kinds of friendship
218(3)
Perfect friendship and imperfect friendship
221(2)
Friendship as a characteristic and as an activity
223(1)
Additional observations on the three kinds of friendship
224(3)
Friendship between unequals
227(1)
Giving and receiving affection
228(3)
Friendship and justice in the state
231(2)
The different political systems
233(2)
Friendship and justice in the different political systems
235(2)
Friendship within the family
237(3)
What equal friends owe to one another
240(3)
What unequal friends owe to one another
243(2)
Book Nine
245(28)
How to measure what friends owe to one another
245(3)
Conflicting obligations
248(2)
When friendships are dissolved
250(2)
Self-love as the basis of friendship
252(3)
Friendship and good will
255(1)
Friendship and concord
256(2)
Good deeds and affection
258(2)
Self-love
260(3)
Friendship and happiness
263(4)
How many friends should we have?
267(2)
Friendship in good and in bad fortune
269(2)
Friends must live together
271(2)
Book Ten
273(30)
The two views about pleasure
273(1)
Eudoxus' view: pleasure is the good
274(2)
The view that pleasure is evil
276(3)
The true character of pleasure
279(3)
The value of pleasure
282(4)
Happiness and activity
286(2)
Happiness, intelligence, and the contemplative life
288(3)
The advantages of the contemplative life
291(4)
Ethics and politics
295(8)
Glossary 303


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