9780802144461

Nohow On Company, Ill Seen Ill Said, and Worstward Ho

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  • ISBN13:

    9780802144461

  • ISBN10:

    0802144462

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 11/11/2014
  • Publisher: Grove Press
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Summary

Now compiled in one volume, these three novels, which are among the most beautiful and disquieting of Samuel Beckett's later prose works, work together with the powerful resonance of his famous Three Novels: Molloy, Malone Dies, and The Unnamable. In Company, a voice comes to "one on his back in the dark" and speaks to him. Ill Seen Ill Said focuses attention on an old woman in a cabin who is part of the objects, landscape, rhythms, and movements of an incomprehensible universe. And in Worstward Ho, Beckett explores a tentative, uncertain existence in a world devoid of rational meaning and purpose. Here is language pared down to its most expressive, confirming Beckett's position as one of the great writers of our time.

Author Biography

Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), one of the leading literary and dramatic figures of the twentieth century, was born in Foxrock, Ireland and attended Trinity College in Dublin. In 1969, Beckett was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature and commended for having "transformed the destitution of man into his exaltation."

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