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Nonverbal Communication in Human Interaction (with InfoTrac),9780534625634
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Nonverbal Communication in Human Interaction (with InfoTrac)

by ;
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780534625634

ISBN10:
0534625630
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/8/2005
Publisher(s):
Cengage Learning

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Summary

The most comprehensive, most readable compendium of research and theory on nonverbal communication available, NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION IN HUMAN INTERACTION (WITH INFOTRAC) uses the cross-disciplinary approaches of speech and social psychology to focus on how nonverbal communication research affects a wide variety of academic interests. Your purchase includes access to InfoTrac College Edition, an online university library of full length articles from academic journals, magazines and newspapers.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Part One An Introduction to the Study of Nonverbal Communication
1(100)
Nonverbal Communication: Basic Perspectives
3(28)
Perspective 1: Defining Nonverbal Communication
5(2)
Encoding
5(1)
Decoding
6(1)
Perspective 2: Classifying Nonverbal Behavior
7(3)
The Communication Environment
7(1)
The Communicators' Physical Characteristics
8(1)
Body Movement and Position
8(2)
Perspective 3: Nonverbal Communication in the Total Communication Process
10(8)
Repeating
12(1)
Conflicting
12(3)
Complementing
15(1)
Substituting
16(1)
Accenting/Moderating
16(1)
Regulating
16(2)
Perspective 4: The History of Nonverbal Studies
18(3)
Perspective 5: Nonverbal Communication in Everyday Life
21(2)
Summary
23(8)
The Roots of Nonverbal Behavior
31(32)
The Development of Nonverbal Behavior Across Evolutionary Time
33(24)
Evidence From Sensory Deprivation
34(3)
Evidence From Infants
37(4)
Evidence From Twin Studies
41(4)
Evidence From Nonhuman Primates
45(8)
Evidence From Multicultural Studies
53(4)
Summary
57(6)
The Ability to Receive and Send Nonverbal Signals
63(38)
Methods for Improving Nonverbal Skills
65(3)
Measuring Accuracy of Decoding and Encoding Nonverbal Cues
68(6)
Standardized Tests of Decoding Ability
70(4)
Characteristics of Skilled Nonverbal Receivers
74(7)
Self-Appraisals and Explicit Knowledge of Nonverbal Cues
75(1)
Gender
75(1)
Age
76(1)
General Cognitive Ability
77(1)
Other Personal Correlates
77(4)
Task Factors Affecting Nonverbal Receiving Accuracy
81(1)
Characteristics of Accurate Nonverbal Senders
81(5)
Putting Decoding and Encoding Together
84(2)
On Being an Observer of Nonverbal Communication
86(4)
The Fallibility of Human Perception
87(3)
Summary
90(11)
Part Two The Communication Environment
101(70)
The Effects of the Environment on Human Communication
103(35)
Perceptions of Our Surroundings
105(3)
Perceptions of Formality
105(1)
Perceptions of Warmth
106(1)
Perceptions of Privacy
106(1)
Perceptions of Familiarity
106(1)
Perceptions of Constraint
107(1)
Perceptions of Distance
107(1)
Reacting to Environments
107(1)
Perceptions of Time
108(2)
Time as Location
109(1)
Time as Duration
109(1)
Time as Intervals
109(1)
Time as Patterns of Intervals
110(1)
The Natural Environment
110(3)
Other People in the Environment
113(1)
Architectural Design and Movable Objects
114(14)
Color
117(2)
Sound
119(1)
Lighting
120(1)
Movable Objects
120(4)
Structure and Design
124(4)
Regulating Environments and Communication
128(1)
Summary
129(9)
The Effects of Territory and Personal Space on Human Communication
138(33)
The Concept of Territoriality
138(1)
Territoriality: Invasion and Defense
139(4)
Density and Crowding
143(4)
The Effects of High Density on Human Beings
145(1)
Coping with High Density
146(1)
Conversational Distance
147(8)
Sex
149(1)
Age
150(1)
Cultural and Ethnic Background
151(1)
Topic or Subject Matter
152(1)
Setting for the Interaction
153(1)
Physical Characteristics
153(1)
Attitudinal and Emotional Orientation
153(1)
Characteristics of the Interpersonal Relationship
154(1)
Personality Characteristics
154(1)
Seating Behavior and Spatial Arrangements in Small Groups
155(6)
Leadership
155(1)
Dominance
156(1)
Task
157(1)
Sex and Acquaintance
158(2)
Introversion--Extraversion
160(1)
Summary
161(10)
Part Three The Communicators
171(52)
The Effects of Physical Characteristics on Human Communication
173(50)
Our Body: Its General Attractiveness
174(7)
Dating and Marriage
175(3)
On the Job
178(1)
Persuading Others
179(1)
Self-Esteem
180(1)
Antisocial Behavior
180(1)
The Power of Physical Attractiveness: Some Important Qualifications
181(2)
The Effects of Interaction
181(1)
The Effects of Other Factors
182(1)
Charging Standards Over Time
183(1)
Our Body: Its Specific Features
183(19)
The Face
183(4)
Body Shape
187(5)
Height
192(2)
Body Image
194(1)
Body Color
195(1)
Body Smell
196(2)
Body Hair
198(4)
Our Body: Clothes And Other Artifacts
202(7)
Clothing and Communication
203(1)
Functions of Clothing
204(1)
Clothing as Information About the Person
205(1)
Effects of Clothing on the Wearer
206(1)
Clothing and Personality
207(1)
Artifacts and Body Decorations
208(1)
Summary
209(14)
Part Four The Communicators' Behavior
223(186)
The Effects of Gesture and Posture on Human Communication
225(39)
Speech-Independent Gestures
226(10)
Speech-Related Gestures
236(5)
Referent-Related Gestures
237(1)
Speaker's-Relationship-to-the-Referent Gestures
237(1)
Punctuation Gestures
238(1)
Interactive Gestures
239(2)
Gesture Frequency
241(2)
The Coordination of Gesture, Posture, and Speech
243(10)
Self-Synchrony
244(2)
Interaction Synchrony
246(7)
Summary
253(11)
The Effects of Touch on Human Communication
264(31)
Touching and Human Development
265(2)
Who Touches Whom, Where, When, and How Much?
267(3)
Different Types of Touching Behavior
270(4)
The Meanings and Impact of Interpersonal Touch
274(7)
Touch as Positive Affect
274(1)
Touch as Negative Affect
275(1)
Touch as Play
275(1)
Touch as Influence
275(1)
Touch as Interaction Management
276(1)
Touch as Physiological Stimulus
276(1)
Touch as Interpersonal Responsiveness
276(1)
Touch as Task Related
277(1)
Touch as Healing
277(1)
Touch as Symbolism
278(3)
Contextual Factors in the Meaning of Interpersonal Touch
281(1)
Touch---A Powerful Unconscious Force in Interaction
282(2)
Self-Touching
284(3)
Summary
287(8)
The Effects of the Face on Human Communication
295(43)
The Face and Personality Judgments
295(1)
The Face and Interaction Management
296(2)
Channel Control
297(1)
Complementing or Qualifying Other Behavior
297(1)
Replacing Spoken Messages
297(1)
The Face and Expressions of Emotion
298(23)
The Face---a Complex Stimulus
299(4)
The Facial Emotion Controversy
303(2)
Measuring the Face
305(7)
Judging Facial Expressions of Emotion
312(3)
Emotions Inferred from the Face
315(6)
Physiology and the Face
321(4)
The Social Impact of Facial Expressions
325(3)
Summary
328(10)
The Effects of Eye Behavior on Human Communication
338(32)
Gaze and Mutua Gaze
340(1)
Functions of Gazing
341(8)
Regulating the Flow of Communication
342(1)
Monitoring Feedback
343(1)
Reflecting Cognitive Activity
343(1)
Expressing Emotions
344(5)
Communicating the Nature of the Interpersonal Relationship
349(3)
Conditions Influencing Gazing Patterns
352(6)
Distance
352(1)
Physical Characteristics
352(1)
Personal and Personality Characteristics
352(3)
Topics and Tasks
355(2)
Cultural Background and Racial Attitudes
357(1)
Pupil Dilation and Constriction
358(3)
Summary
361(9)
The Effects of Vocal Cues that Accompany Spoken Words
370(39)
The Ingredients and Methods of Studying Paralanguage
372(3)
Vocal Cues and Speaker Recognition
375(2)
Vocal Cues and Personality
377(3)
Vocal Cues and Group Perceptions
380(1)
Vocal Cues and Judgments of Sociodemographic Characteristics
381(3)
Sex
381(1)
Age
382(1)
Social Class/Status
382(1)
Target Effects
383(1)
Vocal Cues and Emotion
384(5)
Vocal Cues, Comprehension, and Persuasion
389(2)
Vocal Cues, Comprehension, and Retention
389(1)
Vocal Cues and Persuasion
390(1)
Vocal Cues and Turn Taking in Conversations
391(2)
Turn Yielding
392(1)
Turn Requesting
392(1)
Turn Maintaining
392(1)
Turn Denying
393(1)
Hesitations, Pauses, Silence, and Speech
393(5)
Location or Placement of Pauses
393(1)
Types of Pauses
394(1)
Reasons Why Pauses Occur
395(1)
Influence and Coordination within the Dyad
395(2)
Silence
397(1)
Summary
398(11)
Part Five Communicating Important Messages
409(67)
Using Nonverbal Behavior in Daily Interaction
411(41)
Communicating Intimacy
412(7)
Courtship Behavior
412(2)
Quasi-Courtship Behavior
414(1)
Liking Behavior (Immediacy)
414(3)
Being Close in Close Relationships
417(1)
Mutual Influence
418(1)
Communicating Dominance/Status
419(4)
Managing the Interaction
423(5)
Greeting Behavior
423(1)
Turn-Taking Behavior
424(3)
Leave-Taking Behavior
427(1)
Communicating Our Identity
428(8)
Personal Identity
429(2)
Social Identity
431(5)
Deceiving Others
436(3)
A Perspective for Communicators
439(1)
Summary
439(13)
Nonverbal Messages in Special Contexts
452(24)
Advertising Messages
453(3)
Political Messages
456(4)
Teacher-Student Messages
460(2)
Cultural Messages
462(3)
High-Contact versus Low-Contact Cultures
462(1)
Individualism versus Collectivism
463(1)
High-Context versus Low-Context Cultures
464(1)
Similarities Across Cultures
464(1)
Therapeutic Settings
465(3)
Summary
468(8)
Photo Credits 476(1)
Author Index 477(7)
Subject Index 484


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