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North to Aztlán : A History of Mexican Americans in the United States

by ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780882952437

ISBN10:
0882952439
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
6/5/2012
Publisher(s):
Wiley-Blackwell

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This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 6/5/2012.
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Summary

Contemporary observers often quip that the American Southwest has become 'Mexicanized', but this view ignores the history of the region as well as the social reality. Mexican people and their culture have been continuously present in the territory for the past four hundred years, and Mexican Americans were actors in United States history long before the national media began to focus on them -- even long before an international border existed between the United States and Mexico. North to Aztlán, an inclusive, readable, and affordable survey history, explores the Indian roots, culture, society, lifestyles, politics, and art of Mexican Americans and the contributions of the people to and their influence on American history and the mainstream culture. Though cognizant of changing interpretations that divide scholars, Drs De León and Griswold del Castillo provide a holistic vision of the development of Mexican American society, one that attributes great importance to immigration (before and after 1900) and the ongoing influence of new arrivals on the evolving identity of Mexican Americans. Also showcased is the role of gender in shaping the cultural and political history of La Raza, as exemplified by the stories of outstanding Mexicana and Chicana leaders as well as those of largely unsung female heroes, among them ranch and business owners and managers, labour leaders, community activists, and artists and writers. In short, readers will come away from this extensively revised and completely up-to-date second edition with a new understanding of the lives of a people who currently compose the largest minority in the nation. Completely revised, re-edited, and redesigned, featuring a great many new photographs and maps, North to Aztlán is certain to take its rightful place as the best college-level survey text of Americans of Mexican descent on the market today.

Author Biography

Arnoldo De León is C.J. “Red” Davidson Professor of History at Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas, where he has taught since 1973. He is the author of several works on Texas history and Mexican American history, among them The Tejano Community, 1836—1900 (1982, 1997); They Called Them Greasers: Anglo Attitudes Toward Mexicans in Texas, 1821—1900 (1983); Ethnicity in the Sunbelt: A History of Mexican Americans in Houston, Texas (1989, 2001); Racial Frontiers: Africans, Chinese, and Mexicans in Western America, 1848—1890 (2002); and Tejano Epic: Essays in Honor of Felix D. Almaráz Jr. (2005).

His numerous awards and distinctions include selection as Fellow of the Texas State Historical Association and membership in the Texas Institute of Letters.

Ricardo (Richard) Griswold del Castillo is a professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies at San Diego State University and Chair of the department . He was born in Los Angeles and attended UC Berkeley and the University of Dijon, France, getting his B.A. and Ph.D. in history from U.C.L.A. He taught Chicano and U.S. History at L.A. Trade Tech, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and has been at SDSU for thirty years. His published books include The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo: A Legacy of Conflict (1990); La Familia: Chicano Families in the Urban Southwest, 1848 to the Present (1984); The Los Angeles Barrio, 1850—1890; A Social History (1980); Cesar Chavez: A Triumph of Spirit (with Richard Garcia) (1995); and with Arnoldo De Leon, North to Aztlan: Mexican Americans in United States History (1996, 2006). He is currently working on a collaborative project entitled, “A Chicano and Mexicano History of San Diego.”

He is married and has six children and seven grand children.

Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgements vii
Native American and Spanish Settlements
1(19)
The Spanish/Mexican Northern Frontier
20(21)
Natives in a Foreign Land
41(22)
The Borderlands in Transition
63(22)
The New Colonias: Development, Dispersal, and Diversification, 1910--1930
85(25)
Communities under Stress: Depression and War
110(25)
Mexican Americans in Postwar America
135(23)
Aztlan Rediscovered: The Chicano Movement
158(24)
Latinos and the New Immigrants
182(25)
The Dilemmas and Promises of the New Millennium
207(20)
Community, Diversity, and Culture: Some Conclusions
227(6)
Chronology 233(5)
Glossary 238(5)
Notes and References 243(28)
Bibliographical Essay 271(14)
Index 285


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