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The Norton Field Guide To Writing,9780393977769

The Norton Field Guide To Writing

by
ISBN13:

9780393977769

ISBN10:
0393977765
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
9/18/2005
Publisher(s):
W W Norton & Co Inc
List Price: $51.15

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  • Norton Field Guide to Writing
    Norton Field Guide to Writing




Summary

The rhetoric that tells students what they need to know-and resists the temptation to tell them everything there is to know. Now available in two versions, with and without an anthology of 50 readings.

Table of Contents

Preface v
How to Use This Book xi
Part 1 Rhetorical Situations 1(18)
1 Purpose
3(2)
Identifying your purpose
4(1)
Thinking about purpose
4(1)
2 Audience
5(4)
Identifying your audience
6(1)
Thinking about audience
7(2)
3 Genre
9(3)
Identifying your genre
10(1)
Thinking about genre
10(2)
4 Stance
12(3)
Identifying your stance
13(1)
Thinking about stance
13(2)
5 Media/Design
15(4)
Identifying your media and design needs
16(1)
Thinking about media
16(1)
Thinking about design
17(2)
Part 2 Genres 19(174)
6 Writing a Literacy Narrative
21(18)
RICK BRAGG, All Over But the Shoutin'
21(4)
RICHARD BULLOCK, How I Learned about the Power of Writing
25(2)
SHANNON NICHOLS, "Proficiency"
27(2)
KEY FEATURES
29(1)
A well-told story
Vivid detail
Clear significance
A GUIDE TO WRITING A LITERACY NARRATIVE
30(9)
Choosing a topic
30(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
31(2)
Generating ideas and text 31 Organizing
33(1)
Writing out a draft
34(2)
Considering matters of design
36(1)
Getting response and revising
36(1)
Editing and proofreading
37(1)
Taking stock of your work
38(1)
7 Analyzing a Text
39(21)
DAVID S. RUBIN, It's the Same Old Song
39(3)
WILLIAM SAFIRE, A Spirit Reborn
42(2)
DOUG LANTRY, "Stay Sweet As You Are"
44(6)
KEY FEATURES
50(1)
A summary of the text
Attention to the context
A clear interpretation
Support for your conclusions
A GUIDE TO ANALYZING A TEXT
51(9)
Choosing a text to analyze
51(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
51(1)
Generating ideas and text
52(2)
Organizing
54(1)
Writing out a draft
55(2)
Considering matters of design
57(1)
Getting response and revising
57(1)
Editing and proofreading
58(1)
Taking stock of your work
58(2)
8 Reporting Information
60(22)
THE 9/11 COMMISSION, The Hijacking of United 175
60(4)
CATHI EASTMAN AND BECKY BURRELL, The Science of Screams
64(1)
JEFFREY DEROVEN, The Greatest Generation
65(5)
KEY FEATURES
70(2)
A tightly focused topic
Well-researched information
Various writing strategies
Clear definitions
Appropriate design
A GUIDE TO REPORTING INFORMATION
72(10)
Choosing a topic
72(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
73(1)
Generating ideas and text
74(1)
Organizing
75(1)
Writing out a draft
76(2)
Considering matters of design
78(1)
Getting response and revising
79(1)
Editing and proofreading
80(1)
Taking stock of your work
80(2)
9 Arguing a Position
82(25)
ANNA QUINDLEN, Still Needing the F Word
82(3)
LAWRENCE LESSIG, Some Like It Hot
85(4)
ANDY MCDONIE, Airport Security: What Price Safety?
89(4)
KEY FEATURES
93(2)
A clear and arguable position
Background information
Good reasons
Convincing support
Appeals to readers
A trustworthy tone
Consideration of other positions
A GUIDE TO ARGUING A POSITION
95(12)
Choosing a topic
95(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
96(1)
Generating ideas and text
97(4)
Organizing
101(2)
Writing out a draft
103(1)
Considering matters of design
104(1)
Getting response and revising
105(1)
Editing and proofreading
105(1)
Taking stock of your work
106(1)
10 Abstracts
107(5)
INFORMATIVE ABSTRACTS
107(1)
DESCRIPTIVE ABSTRACTS
108(1)
PROPOSAL ABSTRACTS
108(1)
KEY FEATURES
109(1)
A summary of basic information
Objective description
Brevity
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
109(3)
Considering the rhetorical situation
109(1)
Generating ideas and text
110(1)
Organizing
111(1)
If you need more help
111(1)
11 Annotated Bibliographies
112(8)
MICHAEL BENTON, MARK DOLAN, REBECCA ZISCH, Teen Film$
112(3)
KEY FEATURES
115(1)
A clear scope
Complete bibliographic information
A concise description of the work
Relevant commentary
Consistent presentation
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
116(4)
Considering the rhetorical situation
116(1)
Generating ideas and text
116(3)
Organizing
119(1)
If you need more help
119(1)
12 Evaluations
120(7)
BEN LEEVER, In Defense of Dawson's Creek
120(2)
KEY FEATURES
122(1)
A concise description of the subject
Clearly defined criteria
A knowledgeable discussion
A balanced and fair assessment
Well-supported reasons
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
123(4)
Considering the rhetorical situation
124(1)
Generating ideas and text
124(1)
Organizing
125(1)
If you need more help
126(1)
13 Lab Reports
127(10)
SARAH THOMAS, The Effect of Biofeedback Training
127(5)
KEY FEATURES
132(2)
An explicit title
Abstract
Purpose
Methods
Results and discussion
References
Appendices
Appropriate format
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
134(3)
Considering the rhetorical situation
134(1)
Generating ideas and text
135(1)
Organizing
136(1)
If you need more help
136(1)
14 Literary Analyses
137(10)
STEPHANIE HUFF, Metaphor and Society in Shelley's "Sonnet"
138(2)
KEY FEATURES
140(1)
An arguable thesis
Careful attention to the language of the text
Attention to patterns or themes
A clear interpretation
MLA style
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
141(6)
Considering the rhetorical situation
141(1)
Generating ideas and text
142(4)
Organizing
146(1)
If you need more help
146(1)
15 Memoirs
147(6)
CHANRITHY HIM, When Broken Glass Floats
147(2)
KEY FEATURES
149(1)
A good story
Vivid details
Clear significance
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
150(3)
Deciding on a topic
150(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
150(1)
Generating ideas and text
151(1)
Organizing
152(1)
If you need more help
152(1)
16 Profiles
153(7)
BOB MERLIS, Shirley Barnes, M.D.
153(1)
KEY FEATURES
154(2)
An interesting subject
Background information
An interesting angle
A firsthand account
Engaging details
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
156(4)
Choosing a suitable subject
156(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
156(1)
Generating ideas and text
157(1)
Organizing
158(1)
If you need more help
159(1)
17 Proposals
160(8)
TRACEY KING AND ELLYNNE BANNON, The Burden of Borrowing
160(2)
KEY FEATURES
162(1)
A well-defined problem
A recommended solution
A convincing argument for your solution
Possible questions
A call to action
An appropriate tone
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
163(3)
Deciding on a topic
163(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
164(1)
Generating ideas and text
164(1)
Organizing
165(1)
If you need more help
165(1)
TOPIC PROPOSALS
166(1)
JENNIFER CHURCH, Biodiversity Loss and Its Effect on Medicine
166(1)
KEY FEATURES
167(1)
A concise discussion of the subject
A statement of your intended focus
A rationale for the topic
Mention of resources
18 Reflections
168(6)
BERNARD COOPER, The Fine Art of Sighing
168(2)
KEY FEATURES
170(1)
A topic that intrigues you
Some kind of structure
Specific details
A questioning, speculative tone
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
171(3)
Deciding on a topic
171(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
171(1)
Generating ideas and text
172(1)
Organizing
173(1)
If you need more help
173(1)
19 Reviews of Scholarly Literature
174(8)
DEBRA JOHNSON, Balanced Reading Instruction: A Review of the Literature
174(4)
KEY FEATURES
178(1)
Careful, thorough research
Accurate, objective summaries of the relevant literature
Critical evaluation of the literature
A clear focus
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
179(3)
Considering the rhetorical situation
179(1)
Generating ideas and text
179(2)
Organizing
181(1)
If you need more help
181(1)
20 Résumés and Application Letters
182(11)
RÉSUMÉS
182(3)
KEY FEATURES
185(1)
An organization that suits your goals and experience
Succinct
A design that highlights key information
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
186(3)
Considering the rhetorical situation
186(1)
Generating ideas and text
186(3)
Organizing
189(1)
APPLICATION LETTERS
189(1)
KEY FEATURES
189(2)
Succinct indication of your qualifications
A reasonable and pleasing tone
A conventional, businesslike format
A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING
191(4)
Generating ideas and text
191(1)
Organizing
192(1)
If you need more help
192(1)
Part 3 Processes 193(44)
21 Collaborating
195(4)
Some ground rules for working in a group
195(1)
Group writing projects
196(1)
Online collaboration
197(1)
Writing conferences
197(2)
22 Generating Ideas and Text
199(6)
Freewriting
199(1)
Looping
200(1)
Listing
200(1)
Clustering
201(1)
Cubing
202(1)
Questioning
202(1)
Outlining
203(1)
Letter writing
204(1)
Discovery drafting
204(1)
23 Drafting
205(3)
Establishing a schedule
205(1)
Getting comfortable
205(1)
Starting to write
206(1)
Dealing with writer's block
207(1)
24 Assessing Your Own Writing
208(5)
Assessing the writing you do for yourself
208(1)
Assessing the writing you do for others
209(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
209(1)
Examining the text itself
210(3)
For focus
Argument
Organization
Clarity
25 Getting Response and Revising
213(6)
Getting response
213(1)
Revising
214(2)
Rewriting
216(3)
26 Editing and Proofreading
219(5)
Editing
219(3)
Proofreading
222(2)
27 Compiling a Portfolio
224(13)
Considering the rhetorical situation
224(1)
A WRITING PORTFOLIO
225(5)
What to include
225(1)
Organizing
226(3)
Paper portfolios
Online portfolios
Reflecting on your portfolio
229(1)
A SAMPLE SELF-ASSESSMENT
230(4)
A LITERACY PORTFOLIO
234(5)
What to include
234(1)
Organizing
235(1)
Reflecting on your portfolio
235(2)
Part 4 Strategies 237(92)
28 Beginning and Ending
239(11)
Beginning
239(1)
Ways of beginning
240(5)
Ending
245(1)
Ways of ending
246(2)
Considering the rhetorical situation
248(2)
29 Guiding Your Reader
250(5)
Titles
250(1)
Thesis statements
251(1)
Topic sentences
252(2)
Transitions
254(1)
30 Analyzing Causes and Effects
255(5)
Determining plausible causes and effects
255(1)
Arguing for causes or effects
256(1)
Organizing
257(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
258(2)
31 Classifying and Dividing
260(6)
Classifying
260(1)
Dividing
261(1)
Creating clear and distinct categories
262(3)
Considering the rhetorical situation
265(1)
32 Comparing and Contrasting
266(9)
Two ways of comparing and contrasting
267(4)
The block method
The point-by-point method Using graphs and images
269(2)
Using figurative language
271(2)
Considering the rhetorical situation
273(2)
33 Defining
275(10)
Formal definitions
275(2)
Extended definitions
277(5)
Stipulative definitions
282(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
283(2)
34 Describing
285(9)
Detail
285(3)
Objectivity and subjectivity
288(1)
Vantage point
289(2)
Dominant impression
291(1)
Organizing
292(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
292(2)
35 Dialogue
294(5)
Why add dialogue?
294(1)
Integrating dialogue into your writing
295(1)
Interviews
296(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
297(2)
36 Explaining Processes
299(5)
Explaining clearly
299(1)
Explaining how something is done
299(1)
Explaining how to do something
300(1)
Explaining visually
301(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
302(2)
37 Narrating
304(9)
Sequencing
304(4)
Including pertinent detail
308(2)
Opening and closing with narratives
310(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
311(2)
38 Reading Strategies
313(16)
Reading strategically
313(1)
Previewing a text
314(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
314(1)
Thinking about your initial response
315(1)
Annotating
315(1)
Believing and doubting
316(3)
Thinking about how the text works
319(2)
Summarizing
321(1)
Identifying patterns
322(2)
Analyzing the argument
324(3)
Considering the larger context
327(2)
Part 5 Doing Research 329(122)
39 Developing a Research Plan
331(9)
Establishing a schedule
331(1)
Getting started
331(1)
Considering the rhetorical situation
332(1)
Coming up with a topic
333(2)
Doing some preliminary research
335(1)
Keeping a working bibliography
335(2)
Coming up with a research question
337(1)
Drafting a tentative thesis
337(1)
Creating a rough outline
338(1)
Keeping track of your sources
339(1)
40 Finding Sources
340(14)
Kinds of sources
340(2)
Searching electronically
342(2)
Reference works
344(1)
General
Specialized
Bibliographies
Books
345(1)
Periodicals
346(3)
Print indexes
Electronic indexes and databases
The Web
349(1)
Doing field research
350(4)
Interviews
Observations
41 Evaluating Sources
354(4)
Considering the reliability of sources
354(1)
Considering whether a source serves your purpose
354(2)
Reading sources with a critical eye
356(2)
42 Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing
358(12)
Taking notes
358(1)
Deciding whether to quote, paraphrase, or summarize
359(1)
Quoting
360(3)
Paraphrasing
363(3)
Summarizing
366(1)
Incorporating source materials into your text
367(3)
Signal phrases
Verb tenses
43 Acknowledging Sources, Avoiding Plagiarism
370(5)
Acknowledging sources
370(4)
Avoiding plagiarism
374(1)
44 Documentation
375(3)
UNDERSTANDING DOCUMENTATION STYLES
375(3)
MLA style
377(1)
APA style
377(1)
45 MLA Style
378(39)
A DIRECTORY TO MLA STYLE
378(39)
MLA in-text documentation
381(7)
MLA list of works cited
388(19)
Sample research paper, MLA style
407(10)
46 APA Style
417(34)
A DIRECTORY TO APA STYLE
417(36)
APA in-text documentation
419(7)
APA reference list
426(12)
Sample research paper, APA style
438(13)
Part 6 Media/Design 451(34)
47 Print Text
453(11)
Considering the rhetorical situation
453(1)
Some elements of design
454(4)
Type
Layout
Paragraphs
Lists
Headings
White space
Visuals
458(5)
Evaluating a design
463(1)
48 Spoken Text
464(12)
ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Gettysburg Address
464(1)
JUDY DAVIS, Ours Was a Dad...
465(2)
KEY FEATURES/SPOKEN TEXT
467(1)
A clear structure
Signpost language
A suitable tone
Sound
Visual aids
Considering the rhetorical situation
468(1)
Delivering a spoken text
469(1)
Visual aids
470(6)
49 Electronic Text
476(9)
Considering the rhetorical situation
476(2)
KEY FEATURES/EMAIL
478(1)
An explicit subject line
An appropriate tone
Brevity
Speed and reach
KEY FEATURES/WEB SITES
479(4)
A home page
A clear organizational structure
An explicit navigation system
A consistent design
Links
A sample site
483(2)
Acknowledgments 485(2)
Glossary 487(1)
Index 487


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