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Observing Development Of The Young Child,9780131700130
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Observing Development Of The Young Child

by
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780131700130

ISBN10:
0131700138
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $64.00
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Summary

Distinct from other books on observation techniques, Beatyrs"s practical text, Observing Development of the Young Child, Sixth EDITION, presents her unique system of observing and recording child development using an invaluable planning tool, The Child Skills Checklist. The integration of strategies and children's books to encourage development is a major focus of this best-selling text. Features of this text: bull; bull;Clearly and practically explains what students should look for developmentally in children in their care so that they have a basis for understanding what they are seeing. bull;Highlights use of a practical tool, The Child Skills Checklist, to assess children's development in 11 areas: self-esteem, emotional development, social play, prosocial behavior, large and small motor development, cognitive development, spoken language, emerging literacy skills, art skills, and imagination. bull;Incorporates practical activities to implement with young children and their families to encourage development. Many up-to-date multicultural children's books are listed to support developmental progress.

Table of Contents

1 Assessing Children's Development Through Observation
2(38)
Assessment of Young Children
3(2)
A New Point of View
3(1)
Why Assess Young Children
4(1)
Using Systematic Observation
5(1)
Tests as Tools for Assessing Preschool Children
5(4)
Strengths, Not Weaknesses
8(1)
Indicators for Developmentally Appropriate Assessment
9(1)
Alternative Approaches to Assessment of Preschool Children
10(6)
Play-Based Assessment
10(1)
Interviews
11(2)
Shadow Study Assessments
13(2)
Media Techniques
15(1)
What Should Child Observers Look For?
16(2)
Collecting and Recording Observational Data
18(17)
Narratives
18(7)
Samples
25(4)
Rating Scales
29(3)
Checklists
32(3)
Choosing the Method for Observing and Recording
35(1)
References
36(1)
Suggested Readings
37(1)
Children's Books
38(1)
Videotapes
38(1)
Websites
38(1)
Learning Activities
38(2)
2 Using the Child Skills Checklist
40(26)
Becoming an Observer
41(2)
When Children Recognize Observer
41(1)
Taking Time to Observe
42(1)
Recording Information
43(2)
Using Your Own Shorthand
43(1)
Learning Center Logs
44(1)
Preplanning for Observing
45(1)
Using the Child Skills Checklist
45(12)
Using One Checklist Section at a Time
51(1)
Making a Running Record and Transferring Data to the Checklist
52(2)
Using the Entire Checklist
54(1)
Evidence
55(2)
Interpreting the Data
57(2)
Inferences
57(1)
Conclusions
58(1)
Planning for Children Based on Observations
59(1)
Learning Prescription
59(1)
Chapters to Follow
60(3)
Proceeding from the General to the Specific
60(1)
Proceeding from the Specific to the General
61(1)
Use of Checklist by Preservice Teachers and Student Teachers
62(1)
Observation of Each Child
63(1)
References
63(1)
Suggested Readings
63(1)
Videotapes
64(1)
Learning Activities
64(2)
3 Self-Esteem
66(30)
Developing Self-Esteem
67(2)
Separates from Primary Caregiver Without Difficulty
69(4)
Initial Attachment
69(1)
Initial Separation
70(1)
School Separation
71(2)
Makes Eye Contact with Teachers
73(3)
Develops a Secure Attachment Relationship with Teacher
76(3)
Children with Insecure Attachments
77(2)
Makes Activity Choices Without Teacher's Help
79(2)
Seeks Other Children to Play with
81(2)
Plays Roles Confidently in Dramatic Play
83(4)
Stands Up for Own Rights
87(3)
Cultural Differences in Standing Up for Own Rights
88(2)
Displays Enthusiasm about Doing Things for Self
90(2)
Observing, Recording, and Interpreting Self-Esteem
92(1)
References
93(1)
Suggested Readings
94(1)
Children's Books
94(1)
Videotapes
95(1)
Learning Activities
95(1)
4 Emotional Development
96(34)
Developing Emotions in Young Children
97(2)
Releases Stressful Feelings in Appropriate Manner
99(4)
Distress
99(1)
The Teacher's Role
100(3)
Expresses Anger in Words Rather than Actions
103(6)
Anger
103(3)
Aggression
106(3)
Remains Calm in Difficult or Dangerous Sitations
109(3)
Fear
109(3)
Overcomes Sad Feelings in Appropriate Manner
112(3)
Handles Surprising Situations with Control
115(2)
Surprise
115(2)
Shows Fondness, Affection, Love Toward Others
117(2)
Shows Interest, Attention in Classroom Activities
119(2)
Interest (Excitement)
119(2)
Smiles, Seems Happy Much of the Time
121(3)
Joy
121(3)
Observing, Recording, and Interpreting Emotional Development
124(1)
References
124(2)
Suggested Readings
126(1)
Children's Books,
127(1)
Videotapes
128(1)
Websites
128(1)
Learning Activities
128(2)
5 Social Play
130(32)
Developing Social Play Skills
131(2)
The Importance of Play
133(1)
Other Early Play Research
133(1)
Social Play Development
134(1)
Access Rituals
134(1)
The Teacher's Role
135(1)
Spends Time Watching Others Play
136(2)
Plays By Self with Own Toys/Materials
138(2)
Plays Parallel to Others with Similar Toys/Materials
140(1)
Plays with Others in Group Play
141(3)
Makes Friends with Other Children
144(4)
Gains Access to Ongoing Play in a Positive Manner
148(2)
Maintains Role in Ongoing Play in a Positive Manner
150(3)
Resolves Play Conflicts in a Positive Manner
153(4)
Observing, Recording, and Interpreting Social Play
157(1)
References
158(1)
Suggested Readings
159(1)
Children's Books
160(1)
Videotapes
160(1)
Websites
160(1)
Learning Activities
161(1)
6 Prosocial Behavior
162(28)
Developing Prosocial Behavior
163(2)
Shows Concern for Someone in Distress
165(4)
Empathy
165(4)
Can Tell How Another Child Feels During Conflict
169(2)
Empathy
169(2)
Shares Something with Another
171(3)
Generosity
171(3)
Gives Something to Another
174(2)
Generosity
174(2)
Takes Turns Without a Fuss
176(3)
Cooperation
176(3)
Complies with Requests Without a Fuss
179(2)
Cooperation
179(2)
Helps Another Do a Task
181(2)
Caregiving
181(2)
Helps (Cares For) Another in Need
183(2)
Caregiving
183(2)
Observing, Recording, and Interpreting Prosocial Behavior
185(2)
References
187(1)
Suggested Readings
188(1)
Children's Books
188(1)
Videotapes
189(1)
Websites
189(1)
Learning Activities
189(1)
7 Large Motor Development
190(34)
Developing Large Motor Skills
191(3)
Need for More Exercise
192(1)
Motor Skills in the Preschool Years
193(1)
Walks Down Steps Alternating Feet
194(2)
Runs with Control over Speed and Direction
196(3)
Jumps with Feet Together
199(3)
Climbs Up and Down Climbing Equipment with Ease
202(3)
Throws, Catches, and Kicks Balls
205(4)
Throwing
206(1)
Catching
207(1)
Kicking
208(1)
Rides Trikes, Bikes, and Scooters with Ease
209(3)
Trikes
209(2)
Choosing Trikes
211(1)
Bikes
211(1)
Scooters
211(1)
Moves Legs and Feet in Rhythm to Beat
212(3)
Creative Movement
213(2)
Moves Arms and Hands in Rhythm to Beat
215(4)
Observing, Recording, and Interpreting Large Motor Development
219(2)
References
221(1)
Suggested Readings
221(1)
Children's Books
222(1)
Videotapes
223(1)
Website
223(1)
Learning Activities
223(1)
8 Small Motor Development
224(28)
Developing Small Motor Skills
225(2)
Reflexes
226(1)
Timing
226(1)
Shows Hand Preference
227(2)
Turns with Hand Easily (Knobs, Lids, Eggbeaters)
229(3)
Pours Liquid Into Glass Without Spilling
232(2)
Unfastens and Fastens Zippers, Buttons, Velcro Tabs
234(2)
Picks Up and Inserts Objects with Ease
236(4)
Manipulative Materials
236(1)
Children's Skills
237(1)
Gender Differences
237(3)
Uses Drawing/Writing Tools with Control
240(3)
Uses Scissors with Control
243(2)
Pounds in Nails with Control
245(2)
Observing, Recording, and Interpreting Small Motor Development
247(3)
References
250(1)
Suggested Readings
250(1)
Children's Books
251(1)
Learning Activities
251(1)
9 Cognitive Development
252(40)
Developing Cognitive Concepts
253(3)
Brain Research
256(1)
Using Play
257(1)
Stages of Exploratory Play
258(1)
Classification
258(2)
Assessing Development
260(1)
Sorts Objects by Shape, Color
260(6)
Shape
260(4)
Color
264(2)
Classifies Objects by Size
266(2)
Comparisons
266(1)
Using Opposites
267(1)
Collections
267(1)
Places Objects in a Sequence or Series
268(2)
Recognizes, Creates Patterns
270(3)
Counts by Rote to 20
273(3)
Displays 1-to-1 Correspondence with Numbers
276(4)
Using Marks, Picture Symbols, Number Symbols to Record
278(2)
Problem-Solves with Concrete Objects
280(3)
Types of Reasoning
280(3)
Problem-Solves with Computer Programs
283(3)
Observing, Recording, and Interpreting Cognitive Development
286(1)
References
287(1)
Suggested Readings
288(1)
Children's Books
289(1)
Videotapes
290(1)
Websites
290(1)
Learning Activities
290(2)
10 Spoken Language 292(36)
Developing Spoken Language
293(4)
Stages of Language Acquisition
294(1)
Preschool Stages of Language Production
295(2)
Listens But Does Not Speak
297(4)
Preproduction Stage
297(1)
Provide a Stress-Free Environment
298(3)
Gives Single-Word Answers
301(1)
Transition to Production
301(1)
Gives Short-Phrase Responses
302(2)
Early Production
302(2)
Does Chanting and Singing
304(6)
Early Production
304(2)
Singing
306(2)
Chanting
308(2)
Takes Part in Conversations
310(5)
Early Production
310(1)
The Rules of Conversation
311(1)
Teacher-Child Conversation
312(1)
Child-Child Conversation
313(2)
Speaks in Expanded Sentences
315(4)
Expansion of Production
315(2)
Second Language Speakers
317(2)
Asks Questions
319(2)
Expansion of Production
319(1)
Linguistic Scaffolding
319(2)
Can Tell a Story
321(3)
Expansion of Production
321(1)
Retelling Stories from Picture Books
322(2)
Observing, Recording, and Interpreting Spoken Language
324(1)
References
325(1)
Suggested Readings
325
Children's Books
324(3)
Videotapes
327(1)
CD-ROMs
327(1)
Websites
327(1)
Learning Activities
327(1)
11 Emergent Literacy Skills 328(36)
Developing Early Literacy Skills
329(3)
Pretends to Write with Pictures and Scribbles
332(3)
Makes Horizontal Lines of Writing Scribbles
335(3)
Includes Letter-Like Forms in Writing
338(2)
Makes Some Letters, Prints Name or Initial
340(6)
Alphabet Letters
341(1)
Printing Letters
341(5)
Holds Book Right-Side Up; Turns Pages Right to Left
346(4)
Pretends to Read Using Pictures to Tell Story
350(3)
Retells Stories from Books with Increasing Accuracy
353(3)
Predictable Books
355(1)
Shows Awareness That Print in Books Tells the Story
356(3)
Song Storybooks
357(2)
Observing, Recording, and Interpreting Emergent Literacy Development
359(2)
References
361(1)
Suggested Readings
362(1)
Children's Books
363
Videotape
362(1)
Learning Activities
363(1)
12 Art Skills 364(24)
Developing Art Skills
365(2)
Right Brain vs. Left Brain
367(1)
Makes Random Marks on Paper
367(3)
Makes Controlled Scribbles
370(3)
Makes Basic Shapes
373(2)
Combines Circles/Squares with Crossed Lines
375(1)
Makes Suns
376(2)
Draws Person as Sun-Face with Arms and Legs
378(2)
Draws Animals, Trees, Flowers
380(2)
Animals
380(1)
Trees, Flowers
381(1)
Combines Objects Together in a Picture
382(2)
Observing, Recording, and Interpreting Art Skills
384(2)
References
386(1)
Suggested Readings
386(1)
Children's Books
387(1)
Videotapes
387(1)
Websites
387(1)
Learning Activities
387(1)
13 Imagination 388(32)
Developing Imagination
389(2)
Does Pretend Play by Him/Herself
391(3)
Assigns Roles or Takes on Assigned Roles
394(3)
Needs Particular Props to Do Pretend Play
397(5)
Takes on Characteristics and Actions Related to Role
402(1)
Can Pretend with Imaginary Objects
403(3)
Uses Language for Creating and Sustaining the Plot
406(2)
Spoken Words for Internal Images
407(1)
Uses Exciting, Danger-Packed Themes
408(4)
Superhero and War Play
409(3)
Uses Elaborate Themes, Ideas, Details
412(2)
Observing, Recording, and Interpreting Imagination
414(1)
References
415(1)
Suggested Readings
416(1)
Children's Books
416(1)
Videotapes
417(1)
Websites
417(1)
Learning Activities
417(3)
14 Sharing Observational Data with Parents 420(24)
Involving Parents in Their Children's Programs
421(3)
Focusing on the Child
421(2)
Using the Child Skills Checklist
423(1)
Making Parents Partners
424(2)
Sharing Observation Results
426(11)
Communication Methods
426(1)
Interpreting Checklist Results
427(7)
Sharing Checklist Results with Staff
434(1)
Sharing Checklist Results with Parents
434(1)
Planning for Child Based on Checklist Results
435(2)
Ongoing Observations by Parents and Staff
437(1)
Parent Observation in the Classroom
437(1)
Developing Collaborative Portfolios
437(5)
Why Make Portfolios?
438(2)
What Form Should a Portfolio Take?
440(1)
How Can Portfolios Be Used?
440(2)
References
442(1)
Suggested Readings
442(1)
Videotapes
442(1)
Learning Activities
443(1)
Epilogue: The Missing Component of Child Development 444(9)
Six Principle Elements
445(1)
Is Something Missing?
445(1)
Spirit, What Is It?
446(1)
Why Overlook or Ignore Spirit?
446(1)
How Spirit Can Be Developed in the Young Child
447(1)
Unconditional Love from Others
448(1)
Love and Concern Toward Others
449(1)
Love Vibrations from Natural Beauty
449(1)
A Sixth Sense
450(1)
The Need for Silence
450(1)
References
451(2)
Index of Children's Books 453(4)
Index 457


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