CART

(0) items

Occupational Safety and Health for Technologists, Engineers, and Managers,9780130310439

Occupational Safety and Health for Technologists, Engineers, and Managers

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130310439

ISBN10:
0130310433
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $121.93

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$4.99

Hurry!

Only one copy
in stock at this price.

Buy Used Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
U9780130310439
$1.00

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $3.94
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 4th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2002.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Related Products


  • Occupational Safety and Health for Technologists, Engineers, and Managers
    Occupational Safety and Health for Technologists, Engineers, and Managers
  • Occupational Safety and Health for Technologists, Engineers, and Managers
    Occupational Safety and Health for Technologists, Engineers, and Managers
  • Occupational Safety and Health for Technologists, Engineers, and Managers
    Occupational Safety and Health for Technologists, Engineers, and Managers
  • Occupational Safety and Health for Technologists, Engineers, and Managers
    Occupational Safety and Health for Technologists, Engineers, and Managers




Summary

For undergraduate level Safety Management/Safety and Health Management courses. With an eye on the future and a finger on the pulse of today's rapid changes due to global competition, this straightforward, state-of-the-art guide addresses the key issues, concerns, and factors relating specifically to modern workplace environments in the safety and health professions. Highly functional in content and approach, it draws immediate connections between principles and their practices in real-world settings, includes the latest OSHA standards, and approaches safety and health issues from the perspective of Total Quality Management (TQM) and global competitiveness.

Table of Contents

Safety and Health Movement, Then and Now
1(18)
Developments Before the Industrial Revolution
2(1)
Milestones in the Safety Movement
3(2)
Tragedies That Have Changed the Safety Movement
5(2)
Role of Organized Labor
7(1)
Role of Specific Health Problems
8(2)
Development of Accident Prevention Programs
10(1)
Development of Safety Organizations
11(2)
Safety and Health Movement Today
13(1)
Integrated Approach to Safety and Health
14(1)
New Materials, New Processes, and New Problems
14(1)
Rapid Growth in the Profession
15(3)
Accidents and Their Effects
18(15)
Costs of Accidents
19(1)
Accidental Deaths in the United States
19(2)
Accidents vs. Other Causes of Death
21(1)
Work Accident Costs and Rates
21(1)
Time Lost Because of Work Injuries
22(1)
Deaths in Work Accidents
22(1)
Work Injuries by Type of Accident
23(1)
Death Rates by Industry
23(1)
Parts of the Body Injured on the Job
24(1)
Chemical Burn Injuries
25(1)
Heat Burn Injuries
26(1)
Repetitive Strain/Soft Tissue Injuries
26(2)
Estimating the Cost of Accidents
28(5)
Theories of Accident Causation
33(19)
Domino Theory of Accident Causation
33(3)
Human Factors Theory of Accident Causation
36(2)
Accident/Incident Theory of Accident Causation
38(3)
Epidemiological Theory of Accident Causation
41(2)
Systems Theory of Causation
43(3)
Combination Theory of Accident Causation
46(1)
Behavioral Theory of Accident Causation
47(5)
The OSHAct, Standards, and Liability
52(59)
Rationale for the OSHAct
53(1)
OSHA's Mission and Purpose
53(1)
OSHAct Coverage
54(1)
OSHAct Standards
55(5)
Record Keeping and Reporting
60(7)
Keeping Employees Informed
67(1)
Workplace Inspections
67(1)
Citations and Penalties
68(2)
Appeals Process
70(2)
State-Level OSHA Programs
72(2)
Services Available from OSHA
74(3)
Employer Rights and Responsibilities
77(2)
Employee Rights and Responsibilities
79(1)
Keeping Up to Date on OSHA
80(1)
Problems with OSHA
81(1)
Other Federal Agencies and Organizations
82(5)
OSHA's General Industry Standards
87(10)
OSHA's Maritime Standards
97(2)
OSHA's Construction Standards
99(1)
Standards and Codes
100(1)
Laws and Liability
101(10)
Workers' Compensation
111(35)
Overview of Workers' Compensation
111(3)
Historical Perspective
114(2)
Workers' Compensation Legislation
116(1)
Modern Workers' Compensation
117(2)
Workers' Compensation Insurance
119(3)
Resolution of Workers' Compensation Disputes
122(1)
Injuries and Workers' Compensation
122(2)
Disabilities and Workers' Compensation
124(5)
Monetary Benefits of Workers' Compensation
129(1)
Medical Tratment and Rehabilitation
129(3)
Medical Management of Workplace Injuries
132(1)
Administration and Case Management
133(1)
Cost Allocation
134(1)
Problems with Workers' Compensation
134(1)
Spotting Workers' Compensation Fraud/Abuse
135(1)
Future of Workers' Compensation
136(2)
Cost Reduction Strategies
138(8)
Ergonomic Hazards: Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) and Cumulative Trauma Disorders (CTDs)
146(36)
Ergonomics Defined
147(1)
Factors Associated with Physical Stress
147(2)
OSHA's Ergonomics guidelines and Standard
149(5)
Worksite Analysis Program for Ergonomics
154(4)
Hazard Prevention and Control
158(1)
Medical Management Program
159(4)
Training and Education
163(1)
Common Indicators of Problems
163(2)
Identifying Specific Ergonomic Problems
165(1)
Ergonomic Problem-Solving Strategies
166(7)
Economics of Ergonomics
173(1)
Cumulative Trauma Disorder (CTD)
174(8)
Stress and Safety
182(12)
Workplace Stress Defined
182(1)
Sources of Workplace Stress
183(2)
Human Reactions to Workplace Stress
185(1)
Measurement of Workplace Stress
185(1)
Shift Work, Stress, and Safety
186(1)
Improving Safety by Reducing Workplace Stress
187(2)
Stress in Safety Managers
189(1)
Stress and Workers' Compensation
190(4)
Mechanical Hazards and Machine Safeguarding
194(18)
Common Mechanical Injuriess
194(3)
Safeguarding Defined
197(1)
Risk Assessment in Machine Operation
197(1)
Requirements for All Safeguards
198(1)
Point-of-Operation Guards
199(1)
Point-of-Operation Devices
200(3)
Feeding and Ejection Systems
203(1)
Robot Safeguards
204(1)
Lockout/Tagout Systems
204(3)
General Precautions
207(1)
Basic Program Content
208(1)
Taking Corrective Action
208(4)
Falling, Impact, Acceleration, Lifting, and Vision Hazards
212(33)
Causes of Falls
212(1)
Kinds of Falls
213(1)
Walking and Slipping
213(3)
Slip and Fall Prevention Programs
216(2)
OSHA Fall Protection Standards
218(2)
Ladder Safety
220(2)
Impact and Accelaration Hazards
222(7)
Lifting Hazards
229(4)
Standing Hazards
233(2)
Hand Protection
235(2)
Personal Protective Equipment
237(2)
Forklift Safety
239(6)
Hazards of Temperature Extremes
245(16)
Thermal Comfort
245(1)
Heat, Stress, and Strain
246(4)
Cold Stress
250(4)
Burns and Their Effects
254(2)
Chemical Burns
256(5)
Pressure Hazards
261(16)
Pressure Hazards Defined
261(1)
Sources of Pressure Hazards
262(1)
Boilers and Pressure Hazards
263(1)
High-Temperature Water Hazards
264(1)
Hazards of Unfired Pressure Vessels
265(1)
Hazards of High-Pressure Systems
265(1)
Cracking Hazards in Pressure Vessels
265(2)
Nondestructive Testing of Pressure Vessels
267(1)
Pressure Dangers to Humans
268(2)
Decompression Procedures
270(1)
Measurement of Pressure Hazards
271(1)
Reducing Pressure Hazards
272(5)
Electrical Hazards
277(19)
Electrical Hazards Defined
277(3)
Sources of Electrical Hazards
280(5)
Electrical Hazards to Humans
285(1)
Detection of Electrical Hazards
286(1)
Reducing Electrical Hazards
286(3)
OSHA's Electrical Standards
289(2)
Electrical Safety Program
291(5)
Fire Hazards and Life Safety
296(30)
Fire Hazards Defined
297(3)
Sources of Fire Hazards
300(4)
Fire Dangers to Humans
304(1)
Detection of Fire Hazards
305(1)
Reducing Fire Hazards
306(5)
Development of Fire Safety Standards
311(1)
OSHA Fire Standards
312(1)
Life Safety
313(4)
Flame-Resistant Clothing
317(1)
Fire Safety Programs
317(2)
Explosive Hazards
319(7)
Industrial Hygiene: Toxic Substances and Confined Spaces
326(50)
Overview of Industrial Hygiene
327(1)
OSHAct and Industrial Hygiene
327(5)
Hazards in the Workplace
332(2)
Toxic Substances Defined
334(1)
Entry Points for Toxic Agents
334(3)
Effects of Toxic Substances
337(1)
Relationship of Doses and Responses
337(2)
Airborne Contaminants
339(1)
Effects of Airborne Toxics
340(1)
Effects of Carcinogens
341(1)
Asbestos Hazards
342(3)
Ventilation and the ``Sick-Building'' Syndrome
345(2)
Threshold Limit Values
347(1)
Confined Spaces Hazards
348(1)
Exposure Thresholds
349(1)
Hazard Recognition and Evaluation
350(2)
Prevention and Control
352(4)
NIOSH and Industrial Hygiene
356(1)
NIOSH Guidelines for Respiratores
356(3)
Standards and Regulations
359(4)
General Safety Precautions
363(1)
OSHA Confined Space Standard
364(5)
OSHA Standards for Toxic and Hazardous Materials
369(7)
Radiation Hazards
376(21)
Ionizing Radiation: Terms and Concepts
377(1)
Exposure of Employees to Radiation
378(1)
Precautions and Personal Monitoring
379(1)
Caution Signs and Lables
379(1)
Evacuation Warning Signal
380(1)
Instructing/Informing Personnel
381(1)
Stronge and Disposal of Radioactive Material
381(1)
Notification of Incidents
382(1)
Reports and Records of Overexposure
383(1)
Notice to Employees
383(3)
Nonionizing Radiation
386(3)
Electromagnetic Fields in the Workplace
389(3)
OSHA Standards for Health and Environmental Controls
392(5)
Noise and Vibration Hazards
397(32)
Hearing Loss Prevention Terms
397(2)
Characteristics of Sound
399(2)
Hazard Levels and Risks
401(1)
Standards and Regulations
402(6)
Workers' Compensation and Noise Hazards
408(1)
Identifying and Assessing Hazardsous Noise Conditions
409(2)
Noise Control Strategies
411(5)
Vibration Hazards
416(3)
Other Effects of Noise Hazards
419(1)
Corporate Policy
419(2)
Evaluating Hearing Loss Prevention Programs
421(8)
Preparing for Emergencies
429(20)
Rationale for Emergency Preparation
429(1)
Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act
430(2)
Organization and Coordination
432(1)
OSHA Standards
433(1)
First Aid in Emergencies
433(3)
How to Plan for Emergencies
436(3)
Customizing Plans to Meet Local Needs
439(2)
Emergency Response
441(1)
Computers and Emergency Response
442(2)
Dealing with the Psychological Trauma of Emergencies
444(5)
Safety Analysis and Prevention
449(22)
Overview of Hazard Analysis
449(1)
Preliminary Hazard Analysis
450(3)
Detailed Hazard Analysis
453(8)
Hazard Prevention/Deterrence
461(2)
OSHA Process Safety Standard
463(4)
Risk Assessment
467(4)
Accident Investigation and Reporting
471(16)
When to Investigate
472(1)
What to Investigate
472(1)
Who Should Investigate
473(1)
Conducting the Investigation
474(2)
Interviewing Witnesses
476(3)
Reporting Accidents
479(8)
Promoting Safety
487(20)
Company Safety Policy
488(1)
Safety Rules and Regulations
489(1)
Employee Participation in Promoting Safety
490(1)
Safety Training
490(1)
Suggestion Programs
490(2)
Visual Awareness
492(2)
Safety Committees
494(2)
Gaining a Personal Commitment
496(1)
Employee/Management Participation
497(1)
Incentives
498(1)
Competition
498(1)
Company-Sponsored Wellness Programs
499(1)
Teamwork Approach to Promoting Safety
500(7)
Safety and Health Training
507(37)
Rationale for Safety and Health Training
507(5)
Education and Training Requirements
512(3)
Safety and Health Professionals as Trainers
515(3)
Preparing Safety and Health Instruction
518(3)
Presenting Safety and Health Instruction
521(5)
Applying Safety and Health Instruction
526(1)
Evaluating Safety and Health Instruction
527(1)
Training Supervisors
528(1)
Training New and Transferred Employees
529(2)
Job Safety Analysis as a Training Technique
531(3)
Training Opportunities Available
534(3)
Illiteracy and Safety
537(7)
Computers, Automation, and Robots
544(22)
Impact of Automation on the Workplace
544(1)
VDTs in Offices and Factories
545(3)
Human/Robot Interaction
548(1)
Safety and Health Problems Associated with Robots
549(3)
Safety and Health in Office Automation
552(2)
Industrial Medicine and Robots
554(2)
Technological Alienation in the Automated Workplace
556(1)
Minimizing the Problems of Automation
557(2)
Challenge for the Future
559(7)
Ethics and Safety
566(17)
An Ethical Dilemma
566(1)
Ethics Defined
567(2)
Ethical Behavior in Organizations
569(2)
Safety and Health Professional's Role in Ethics
571(1)
Company's Role in Ethics
572(3)
Handling Ethical Dilemmas
575(1)
Questions to Ask When Making Decisions
576(1)
Ethics and Whistle-Blowing
576(7)
Bloodborne Pathogens in the Workplace
583(26)
Facts About AIDS
583(1)
Symptoms of AIDS
584(1)
AIDS in the Workplace
585(2)
Legal Concerns
587(5)
AIDS Education
592(1)
Counseling Infected Employees
593(1)
Easing Employees' Fears About AIDS
594(1)
Protecting Employes from AIDS
595(2)
Heapatitics B (HBV) and Hepatitis C (HCV) in the Workplace
597(3)
OSHA's Standard on Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens
600(9)
Environmental Safety and ISO 14000 (Environmental Management)
609(42)
Safety, Health, and the Environment
609(1)
Legislation and Regulation
610(3)
Types of Environments
613(1)
Role of Safety and Health Professionals
614(1)
Hazards of the Environment
615(5)
Hazardous Waste Reduction
620(7)
Environmental Management System (EMS)
627(5)
International Organization for Standardization (ISO)
632(1)
ISO 14000
633(1)
ISO 14000 Series of Standards
634(2)
ISO 14001 Standard
636(15)
Product Safety and Liability
651(18)
Product Liability and the Law
652(5)
Developing a Product Safety Program
657(1)
Evaluating the Product Safety Program
658(2)
Role of the Safety and Health Professional
660(1)
Total Quality Management and Product Safety
661(1)
Product Safety Program Record Keeping
662(2)
User Feedback Collection and Analysis
664(1)
Product Literature and Safety
664(5)
Roles and Professional Certifications for Safety and Health Personnel
669(30)
Modern Safety and Health Teams
669(1)
Safety and Health Manager
670(8)
Engineers and Safety
678(9)
Health Physicist
687(1)
Occupational Physician
687(2)
Occupational Health Nurse/Nurse Practitioner
689(1)
Risk Manager
690(1)
Certification of Safety and Health Professionals
691(8)
TSM: Safety Management in a TQM Setting
699(16)
What is TQM?
699(2)
How Does TQM Relate to Safety?
701(1)
Safety Management in a TQM Setting
702(1)
What is TSM?
703(2)
Translating TSM into Action
705(1)
Fundamental Elements of TSM
706(4)
Rationale for TSM
710(1)
Implementing TSM: The Model
711(4)
Safety, Health, and Competition in the Global Marketplace
715(11)
Competitiveness Defined
716(1)
Productivity and Competitiveness
717(2)
Quality and Competitiveness
719(1)
How Safety and Health Can Improve Competitiveness
720(6)
Violence in the Workplace
726(29)
Occupational Safety and Workplace Violence: The Relationship
727(1)
Workplace Violence: Definitions
727(1)
Workplace Violence: Cases
728(2)
Size of the Problem
730(1)
Legal Considerations
731(3)
Risk Reduction Strategies
734(2)
Contributing Social/Cultural Factors
736(2)
OSHA's Voluntary Guidelines
738(8)
Conflict Resolution and Workplace Violence
746(5)
Dos and Don'ts for Supervisors
751(1)
Emergency Preparedness Plan
751(4)
Glossary 755(20)
Index 775


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...