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Oculoplastics And Orbit

by ;
ISBN13:

9783540225997

ISBN10:
3540225994
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
11/15/2005
Publisher(s):
Springer Verlag
List Price: $135.00
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Summary

Considerable progress has been made in various fields of oculoplastic surgery, e.g. the development of endoscopic transcanalicular as well as endonasal minimal invasive techniques in lacrimal surgery, the use of muscle pedunculated scleral flaps to improve implant motility without pegging. This extraordinary volume enhances your understanding of Graves??? ophthalmopathy and helps you to define situations suitable for radiotherapy and more differentiated surgical strategies such as orbital fat resection, balance bony decompression and lid lengthening procedures. It exemplifies progress in aesthetic surgery such as endoscopic brow lift and soft techniques for mid-face rejuvenation and discusses general risks of infectious disease transmission using allografts as well as current concepts in the management of conjunctival neoplasms. Not only general and clinical ophthalmologists, but also ophthalmic and plastic surgeons will find this volume a stimulating resource that keeps them up to date on new developments in the interesting field of oculoplastic surgery.

Table of Contents

General Considerations
CHAPTER 1 Risk of Infectious Disease Transmission Through Use of Allografts
ROBERT H. KENNEDY, C. RANDAL MILLS, PAUL BROWN
Introduction
4(1)
1.2 Reports of Infectious Disease Transmission
4(5)
1.2.1 Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)
5(1)
1.2.2 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
6(1)
1.2.3 Other Conventional Infectious Diseases
7(1)
1.2.4 Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD)
8(1)
1.3 Sources of Risk for Allograft Contamination
9(5)
1.3.1 Living Donors and Cadaveric Tissue
10(1)
1.3.2 Donor Screening and Testing
11(1)
1.3.3 Aseptic Processing of Donor Tissue
12(2)
1.4 Estimated Risk of Allograft Contamination
14(1)
1.4.1 HIV
14(1)
1.4.2 HCV and HBV
15(1)
1.5 Human Error in Donor Screening and Testing
15(1)
1.6 Conclusions and Recommendations
16(1)
References
17(4)
Oncology
CHAPTER 2 Current Concepts in the Management of Conjunctival Neoplasms
CAROL L. SHIELDS, JERRY A. SHIELDS
2.1 Introduction
21(1)
2.2 Conjunctival Anatomy
21(1)
2.3 Diagnostic Techniques
22(1)
2.4 Management
22(3)
2.5 Diagnostic Categories of Conjunctival Tumors
25(1)
2.6 Papilloma
26(1)
2.7 Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia (OSSN)
27(1)
2.7.1 Conjunctival Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN)
27(1)
2.7.2 Squamous Cell Carcinoma
27(1)
2.8 Nevus
28(1)
2.9 Primary Acquired Melanosis (PAM)
29(2)
2.10 Malignant Melanoma
31(1)
2.11 Lymphoid Tumors
32(1)
2.12 Caruncular Tumors
32(1)
References
33(5)
CHAPTER 3 Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Conjunctival and Eyelid Malignancies
DOMINICK GOLIO, BITA ESMAELI
3.1 Introduction
38(1)
3.2 Historical Perspective and Rationale for Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy
38(1)
3.3 Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Conjunctival and Eyelid Tumors
39(5)
3.3.1 Patient Selection and Indications
40(1)
3.3.2 Anatomic Considerations
40(1)
3.3.3 Technical Considerations
40(3)
3.3.4 Histopathologic Analysis of Sentinel Lymph Nodes
43(1)
3.3.5 Lymphatic Basins at Risk
44(1)
3.4 Care of Patients with a Positive Sentinel Lymph Node
44(2)
3.4.1 Potential Complications and Limitations
44(2)
3.5 Conclusions and Future Directions
46(1)
References
46(5)
Lacrimal Surgery
CHAPTER 4 The Apparent Paradox of "Success" in Lacrimal Drainage Surgery
GEOFFREY E. ROSE
4.1 Introduction
51(1)
4.2 The "Lacrimal Paradox" and the Dichotomy of Lacrimal Characteristics
52(3)
4.3 The Three-Compartment Model of Lacrimal Drainage
55(2)
4.4 Osteotomy Size and the Soft-Tissue Anastomosis After Dacryocystorhinostomy
57(2)
References
59(2)
CHAPTER 5 Microsurgery of the Lacrimal System: Microendoscopic Techniques
KARL-HEINZ EMMERICH, HANS-WERNER MEYER-ROSENBERG
5.1 Introduction
61(1)
5.2 D acryo endos copy
62(7)
5.2.1 Technical Equipment
62(2)
5.2.2 Performing Endoscopy
64(2)
5.2.3 Transcanalicular Endoscopic Procedures
66(3)
5.3 Conclusions
69(1)
Citation and References
70(1)
CHAPTER 6 Techniques in Endonasal Dacryocystorhinostomy
PETER J. DOLMAN
6.1 Introduction
71(1)
6.2 History
71(1)
6.3 Preoperative Considerations
72(1)
6.3.1 Clinical Assessment of Epiphora
72(1)
6.3.2 Indications for Surgery
72(1)
6.3.3 Special Considerations in Endonasal DCRs
73(1)
6.4 Perioperative Considerations
73(1)
6.4.1 Hemostasis
73(1)
6.4.2 Anesthesia
73(1)
6.4.3 Antibiotics
74(1)
6.4.4 Set-up
74(1)
6.5 Operative Techniques
74(4)
6.5.1 Illumination Source
74(1)
6.5.2 Viewing Systems
74(1)
6.5.3 Formation of the Osteotomy
75(2)
6.5.4 Fenestrating the Lacrimal Sac
77(1)
6.5.5 Mitomycin-C
78(1)
6.5.6 Stenting
78(1)
6.6 Postoperative Care
78(1)
6.7 EN-DCR for Specific Conditions
78(1)
6.7.1 Pediatric EN-DCR
78(1)
6.7.2 EN-DCR with Canalicular Stenosis
79(1)
6.8 Complications
79(1)
6.9 Comparison of EN-DCR and EX-DCR
80(1)
6.10 Transition to EN-DCR
80(1)
References
81(2)
CHAPTER 7 Monocanalicular Lacrimal Pathway Intubatior with a Stable Punctal Attachment
BRUNO FAYET, JEAN-MARC RUBAN
7.1 Introduction
83(1)
7.2 Description and Fitting for Monocanalicular Stenting: The Mono-KaŽ Device
83(1)
7.2.1 Description of the Superior Fixation Device (SFD)
83(1)
7.2.2 Monocanalicular Intubation: Technique for Insertion
84(1)
7.2.3 Limitations of the Mono-KaŽ Device
84(1)
7.2.4 Indications and Contraindications for the Mono-KaŽ
84(1)
7.2.5 Caution
84(1)
7.3 The Mini-Mono-KaŽ Device
84(1)
7.4 Supervision and Removal of the Mono-KaŽ
85(1)
7.5 Complications
85(1)
7.5.1 Complications Related to the Insertion of the Mono-KaŽ
85(1)
7.6 Undesirable Side Effects of the Mono-KaŽ After Placement in the Lacrimal Pathways
86(1)
7.6.1 Dyeing of the Silicone
86(1)
7.6.2 Itching
86(1)
7.6.3 Impermeability
86(1)
7.7 Late Complications of the Mono-KaŽ After Insertion in the Lacrimal Drainage Pathway
87(1)
7.7.1 Externalization or Extrusion
87(1)
7.7.2 Intracanalicular Migration
87(1)
7.8 Prevention of Intracanalicular Migration of the Mono-KaŽ
87(1)
7.9 Complications of the Mini- Mono-KaŽ Device
88(1)
References
88(3)
Graves' Ophthalmopathy
CHAPTER 8 The Role of Orbital Radiotherapy in the Management of Thyroid Related Orbitopathy
MICHAEL KAZIM
8.1 Introduction: Historical Background
91(2)
8.2 Biological Effects of Radiotherapy
93(1)
8.3 Safety
94(1)
8.4 Pre-treatment Analysis
94(1)
8.4.1 10- vs. 20-GY Dose Treatment
94(1)
8.5 Recommendations and Future Developments
94(1)
References
95(2)
CHAPTER 9 Bony Orbital Decompression Techniques
K.E. MORGENSTERN, PAUL PROFFER, JILL A. FOSTER
9.1 Introduction
97(1)
9.2 History of Bony Decompression
98(1)
9.3 Indications
98(1)
9.4 Characterizing Decompressive Surgery
99(1)
9.5 Surgical Approach
99(1)
9.6 Bony Decompression Techniques
100(4)
9.6.1 Anterior and Posterior Lateral Wall
100(2)
9.6.2 Medial Wall
102(1)
9.6.3 Floor
103(1)
9.6.4 Roof
104(1)
9.7 Alternative Approaches to Orbital Decompression
104(3)
9.7.1 Transantral
104(1)
9.7.2 Endoscopic
105(1)
9.7.3 Orbital Fat Decompression
106(1)
9.7.4 Potential Complications
106(1)
9.8 Conclusion
107(1)
References
107(2)
CHAPTER 10 Orbital Decompression Using Fat Removal Orbital Decompression
JEAN-PAUL ADENIS, PIERRE-YVES ROBERT
10.1 Introduction
109(1)
10.2 Description
110(4)
10.2.1 The Upper Eyelid
110(2)
10.2.2 The Lower Eyelid
112(1)
10.2.3 The Volume of Resection
113(1)
10.2.4 Treatment Program
113(1)
10.3 Our Experience
114(1)
10.3.1 Patients
114(1)
10.3.2 Surgical Procedure
114(1)
10.3.3 Clinical Data
114(1)
10.3.4 Statistics
114(1)
10.4 Results
114(2)
10.4.1 Proptosis
114(1)
10.4.2 Visual Field
115(1)
10.4.3 Intraocular Pressure
116(1)
10.4.4 Volume of Excised Fat
116(1)
10.4.5 Diplopia
116(1)
10.5 Discussion
116(3)
10.5.1 Types of Bone Removal Orbital Decompression (BROD) Performed
116(1)
10.5.2 FROD or BROD?
117(2)
10.6 Conclusion
119(1)
References
119(4)
Esthetic and Lid Surgery
CHAPTER 11 Update on Upper Lid Blepharoplasty
MARKUS J. PFEIFFER
11.1 Introduction
123(1)
11.2 Surgical Anatomy of the Upper Lid and Upper Orbit
123(7)
11.2.1 Relationship of Aperture Plane, Lid Crease and Skin Fold
124(1)
11.2.2 The Aperture Plane
124(1)
11.2.3 The Upper Lid Crease
125(1)
11.2.4 The Skin Fold
125(1)
11.2.5 The Eyelid Skin
126(1)
11.2.6 The Relationship of the Anterior and the Posterior Lid Lamella
126(1)
11.2.7 The Pretarsal Orbicularis Muscle
126(1)
11.2.8 The Preseptal Orbicularis Muscle
127(1)
11.2.9 The Orbital Part of the Orbicularis Muscle
127(1)
11.2.10 The Suborbicularis Oculi Fat (SOOF)
127(1)
11.2.11 The Orbital Septum
128(1)
11.2.12 The Orbital Fat
128(1)
11.2.13 The Eyebrow
129(1)
11.2.14 The Frontalis Muscle and Its Antagonists
129(1)
11.2.15 The Posterior Lid Lamella
130(1)
11.3 The Preoperative Evaluation and Surgical Planning
130(4)
11.3.1 The Patient's Expectation
130(1)
11.3.2 The Evaluation of the Lid Crease Symmetry
131(1)
11.3.3 Preoperative Examination
131(1)
11.3.4 Differentiation of Simple and Complicated Cases
132(1)
11.3.5 Planning Blepharoplasty According to the Typology of Cases
132(2)
11.4 Surgical Technique of the Most Frequent Types of Upper Lid Blepharoplasty
134(4)
11.4.1 Marking the Outlines of Incisions
134(1)
11.4.2 Local Anaestesia
135(1)
11.4.3 Skin Incision
135(1)
11.4.4 Skin Excision
135(1)
11.4.5 Orbicularis Separation
135(1)
11.4.6 Orbicularis Excision
135(1)
11.4.7 Identification of the Septum
135(1)
11.4.8 Dissection of the Septum
136(1)
11.4.9 Management of the Preaponeurotic Fat
136(1)
11.4.10 Management of the Intermedial Orbital Fat
136(1)
11.4.11 Exposure of the Medial Orbital Fat
136(1)
11.4.12 Resection of the Medial Orbital Fat
137(1)
11.4.13 Resection of the Medial Subcutaneous Fat
137(1)
11.4.14 SOOF Resection
137(1)
11.4.15 Sutures
138(1)
11.4.16 Laser Blepharoplasty
138(1)
11.5 Complications in Upper Lid Blepharoplasty: Prevention and Management
138(3)
11.5.1 Undercorrection
138(1)
11.5.2 Overcorrection
139(1)
11.5.3 Excessive Skin Resection
139(1)
11.5.4 Excessive Orbicularis Muscle Resection
139(1)
11.5.5 Excessive SOOF Resection
140(1)
11.5.6 Excessive Resection of Preaponeurotic Fat
140(1)
11.5.7 Excessive Resection of Medial Orbital Fat
140(1)
11.5.8 Asymmetry
140(1)
11.5.9 Double Skin Fold
141(1)
11.5.10 Posterior Lamella Lacerations
141(1)
11.5.11 Failure to Correct Associated Pathology
141(1)
11.5.12 Hemorrhage, Edema and Scar Formation
141(1)
References
141(3)
CHAPTER 12 Update on Lasers in Oculoplastic Surgery
JULIE A. WOODWARD, AERLYN G. DAWN
12.1 Introduction
144(1)
12.2 Incisional Laser Surgery
145(4)
12.2.1 CO2 Laser
145(3)
12.2.2 Erbium: YAG Laser
148(1)
12.2.3 Neodymium: YAG Laser
149(1)
12.3 Laser Skin Resurfacing
149(7)
12.3.1 CO, Laser Skin Resurfacing
151(1)
12.3.2 Erbium: YAG Laser Skin Resurfacing
151(2)
12.3.3 Combined CO2 and Erbium Laser Resurfacing
153(1)
12.3.4 Non-ablative Resurfacing
153(3)
12.4 Laser Treatment of Cutaneous Vascular Lesions
156(1)
12.5 Laser Treatment of Tattoos
157(1)
12.6 Laser Hair Removal
158(1)
12.7 Laser Dacryocystorhinostomy
159(1)
12.7.1 Holmium Laser
159(1)
12.7.2 Potassium Titanyl Phosphate Laser
159(1)
References
160(3)
CHAPTER 13 Update on the Endoscopic Brow Lift: Pearls and Nuances
BHUPENDRA C.K. PATEL
13.1 Introduction
163(1)
13.2 Number of Scalp Incisions
164(1)
13.3 Sites of Scalp Incisions
164(1)
13.4 Forehead Dissection
165(1)
13.5 Release of Periosteum
166(1)
13.6 Weakening of the Forehead Muscles
167(1)
17.7 Fixation of the Mobilized Forehead: How Long Is Fixation Necessary?
168(1)
13.8 Methods of Fixation
168(1)
13.9 Simplified Technique of Bone Tunneling
169(1)
13.10 Method of Elevation
170(1)
13.11 Buried Screw and Suture
171(2)
13.12 Endotine Fixation
173(1)
13.13 Closure
173(2)
13.14 Postoperative Care
175(1)
13.15 Conclusion
175(4)
References
179(2)
CHAPTER 14 The SOOF Lift in Midface Reconstruction and Rejuvenation
ROBERT M. SCHWARCZ, NORMAN SHORR
14.1 Introduction
181(1)
14.2 Anatomy of the Midface
182(1)
14.3 Age Related Changes of the Midface
183(1)
14.4 Patient Selection
183(1)
14.5 Surgical Technique
184(5)
14.5.1 Transconjunctival Approach
185(2)
14.5.2 Sublabial Approach
187(1)
14.5.3 Closed Cable Lift
188(1)
References
189(2)
CHAPTER 15 Facial Paralysis: A Comprehensive Approach to Current Management
ROBERTA E. GAUSAS
15.1 Introduction
191(1)
15.2 Diagnosis
191(4)
15.2.1 Patient History
192(1)
15.2.2 Anatomy and Function
193(2)
15.3 Facial Nerve: Physical Examination
195(3)
15.3.1 Brow Complex
196(1)
15.3.2 Periorbital Complex
196(1)
15.3.3 Midface and Perioral Complex
197(1)
15.4 Treatment Strategies
198(5)
15.4.1 Supportive Care
198(1)
15.4.2 Surgical Strategies
199(4)
15.5 Aberrant Regeneration
203(1)
References
203(2)
CHAPTER 16 Self-inflating Hydrogel Expanders for the Treatment of Congenital Anophthalmos
MICHAEL P. SCHITTKOWSKI, JAMES A. KATOWITZ, KARSTEN K.H. GUNDLACH, RUDOLF F. GUTHOFF
16.1 Introduction
205(2)
16.1.1 Clinical Features
205(1)
16.1.2 Epidemiology
205(1)
16.1.3 Definition of Terms
206(1)
16.1.4 Etiology
206(1)
16.1.5 Treatment
206(1)
16.2 Patients and Method
207(2)
16.2.1 Osmotic Expanders
207(1)
16.2.2 Patients
208(1)
16.3 Results
209(6)
16.3.1 Treatment Course
209(3)
16.3.2 Expander Failures/Complication
212(1)
16.3.3 Number of Operations
212(1)
16.3.4 Treatment Results
213(2)
16.3.5 Acceptance
215(1)
16.4 Discussion
215(5)
16.4.1 Introduction
215(1)
16.4.2 Pathogenesis
215(1)
16.4.3 Existing Therapy Concepts - Pros and Cons
216(4)
References
220(3)
CHAPTER 17 Methods to Improve Prosthesis Motility in Enucleation Surgery Without Pegging and With Emphasis on Muscle Pedunculated Flaps
RUDOLF F. GUTHOFF, MICHAEL P. SCHITTKOWSKI, ARTUR KLETT
17.1 Introduction
223(1)
17.2 Short History of Alloplastic Implants
223(1)
17.3 Evisceration/Enucleation - Pros and Cons
224(1)
17.3.1 Intraocular Malignancy
224(1)
17.3.2 Endophthalmitis
224(1)
17.3.3 Blind and Painful Eye
225(1)
17.3.4 Sympathethic Ophthalmia
225(1)
17.4 Orbital Implants - Materials, Shape, Implantation Technique
225(3)
17.4.1 Non-integrated Implants
225(2)
17.4.2 Integrated Implants
227(1)
17.5 Wrapping Materials
228(1)
17.6 Indications for Pegging
228(1)
17.7 Motility Evaluation
228(1)
17.8 Strategies to Improve Prosthesis Motility Without Pegging
229(3)
17.9 Suggestions for an Effective Compromise Between Enucleation and Evisceration: Muscle Pedunculated Scleral Flaps
232(2)
References
234(4)
CHAPTER 18 Current Management of Traumatic Enophthalmos
RICHARD C. ALLEN, JEFFREY A. NERAD
18.1 Introduction
238(1)
18.1.1 Anatomy
238(1)
18.2 Enophthalmos
239(5)
18.2.1 Non-traumatic Causes of Enophthalmos
239(1)
18.2.2 Traumatic Enophthalmos
240(1)
18.2.3 Mechanism of Traumatic Enophthalmos
240(1)
18.2.4 Fractures Associated with Enophthalmos
241(1)
18.2.5 Evaluation of the Patient with Traumatic Enophthalmos
242(2)
18.3 Treatment of Traumatic Enophthalmos
244(4)
18.3.1 Non-surgical Treatment of Traumatic Enophthalmos
244(1)
18.3.2 Surgical Treatment of Traumatic Enophthalmos
244(4)
18.4 Enophthalmos Associated with the Anophthalmic Socket
248(1)
18.4.1 Mechanism
248(1)
18.4.2 Treatment of Enophthalmos in the Anophthalmic Socket
249(1)
References
249(4)
Subject Index 253


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