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Operating System Concepts, 7th Edition,9780471694663
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Operating System Concepts, 7th Edition

by ; ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780471694663

ISBN10:
0471694665
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
12/1/2004
Publisher(s):
WILEY
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Summary

* New student-focused pedagogy and a new two-color design to enhance the learning process.

Author Biography

Abraham Silberschatz is a Professor of Computer Science at Yale university. Prior to joining Yale, he was the Vice President of t5he Information Sciences Research Center at Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey. Prior5 to that, he held a chaired professorship in the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. His research interest include operating systems, database systems, real-time systems storage systems, network management, and distributed systems.

In addition to his academic and industrial positions, Professor Silberschatz served as a member of the Biodiversity and Ecosystems Panel on President Clinton's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology, as an advisor for the National Science Foundation, and as a consultant for several private industry companies.

Professor Silberschatz is an ACM Fellow and an IEEE Fellow. He received the 2002 IEEE Taylor L. Booth Education Award the 1998 ACM Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award, the 1997 ACM SIGMOD Contribution Award, and the IEEE Computer Society Outstanding Paper award for the article "Capability Manager", which appeared in the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering. His writings have appeared in numerous ACM and IEEE publications and other professional conferences and journals. He is a coauthor of the textbook Database System Concepts.

Greg Gagne is chair of the Division of Computer Science and Mathematics at Westminster College in Salt Lake City where he has been teaching since 1990. In addition to teaching operating systems, he also teaches computer networks, distributed systems, object-oriented programming, and data structures. He also provides workshops to computer science educators and industry professionals. Professor Gagne's current research interests include next-generation operating systems and distributed computing.

Peter Baer Galvin is the chief technologist for Corporate Technologies (www.cptech.com). Before that, Peter was the systems manager for Brown University's Computer Science Department. He is also contributing editor for SysAdmin magazine. Mr. Galvin has written articles for Byte and other magazines, and previously wrote the security column and systems administration column for ITWORLD. As a consultant and trainer, Peter has given talks and taught tutorials on security and system administration worldwide.

Table of Contents

PART ONE OVERVIEW
Chapter 1 Introduction
1.1 What Operating Systems Do
3(3)
1.2 Computer-System Organization
6(6)
1.3 Computer-System Architecture
12(3)
1.4 Operating-System Structure
15(2)
1.5 Operating-System Operations
17(3)
1.6 Process Management
20(1)
1.7 Memory Management
21(1)
1.8 Storage Management
22(4)
1.9 Protection and Security
26(2)
1.10 Distributed Systems
28(1)
1.11 Special-Purpose Systems
29(2)
1.12 Computing Environments
31(3)
1.13 Summary
34(2)
Exercises
36(2)
Bibliographical Notes
38(1)
Chapter 2 Operating-System Structures
2.1 Operating-System Services
39(2)
2.2 User Operating-System Interface
41(2)
2.3 System Calls
43(4)
2.4 Types of System Calls
47(8)
2.5 System Programs
55(1)
2.6 Operating-System Design and Implementation
56(2)
2.7 Operating-System Structure
58(6)
2.8 Virtual Machines
64(6)
2.9 Operating-System Generation
70(1)
2.10 System Boot
71(1)
2.11 Summary
72(1)
Exercises
73(5)
Bibliographical Notes
78(3)
PART TWO PROCESS MANAGEMENT
Chapter 3 Processes
3.1 Process Concept
81(4)
3.2 Process Scheduling
85(5)
3.3 Operations on Processes
90(6)
3.4 Interprocess Communication
96(6)
3.5 Examples of IPC Systems
102(6)
3.6 Communication in Client-Server Systems
108(7)
3.7 Summary
115(1)
Exercises
116(9)
Bibliographical Notes
125(2)
Chapter 4 Threads
4.1 Overview
127(2)
4.2 Multithreading Models
129(2)
4.3 Thread Libraries
131(7)
4.4 Threading Issues
138(5)
4.5 Operating-System Examples
143(3)
4.6 Summary
146(1)
Exercises
146(5)
Bibliographical Notes
151(2)
Chapter 5 CPU Scheduling
5.1 Basic Concepts
153(4)
5.2 Scheduling Criteria
157(1)
5.3 Scheduling Algorithms
158(11)
5.4 Multiple-Processor Scheduling
169(3)
5.5 Thread Scheduling
172(1)
5.6 Operating System Examples
173(8)
5.7 Algorithm Evaluation
181(4)
5.8 Summary
185(1)
Exercises
186(3)
Bibliographical Notes
189(2)
Chapter 6 Process Synchronization
6.1 Background
191(2)
6.2 The Critical-Section Problem
193(2)
6.3 Peterson's Solution
195(2)
6.4 Synchronization Hardware
197(3)
6.5 Semaphores
200(4)
6.6 Classic Problems of Synchronization
204(5)
6.7 Monitors
209(8)
6.8 Synchronization Examples
217(5)
6.9 Atomic Transactions
222(8)
6.10 Summary
230(1)
Exercises
231(11)
Bibliographical Notes
242(3)
Chapter 7 Deadlocks
7.1 System Model
245(2)
7.2 Deadlock Characterization
247(5)
7.3 Methods for Handling Deadlocks
252(1)
7.4 Deadlock Prevention
253(3)
7.5 Deadlock Avoidance
256(6)
7.6 Deadlock Detection
262(4)
7.7 Recovery From Deadlock
266(1)
7.8 Summary
267(1)
Exercises
268(3)
Bibliographical Notes
271(4)
PART THREE MEMORY MANAGEMENT
Chapter 8 Main Memory
8.1 Background
275(7)
8.2 Swapping
282(2)
8.3 Contiguous Memory Allocation
284(4)
8.4 Paging
288(9)
8.5 Structure of the Page Table
297(5)
8.6 Segmentation
302(3)
8.7 Example: The Intel Pentium
305(4)
8.8 Summary
309(1)
Exercises
310(2)
Bibliographical Notes
312(3)
Chapter 9 Virtual Memory
9.1 Background
315(4)
9.2 Demand Paging
319(6)
9.3 Copy-on-Write
325(2)
9.4 Page Replacement
327(13)
9.5 Allocation of Frames
340(3)
9.6 Thrashing
343(5)
9.7 Memory-Mapped Files
348(5)
9.8 Allocating Kernel Memory
353(4)
9.9 Other Considerations
357(6)
9.10 Operating-System Examples
363(2)
9.11 Summary
365(1)
Exercises
366(4)
Bibliographical Notes
370(3)
PART FOUR STORAGE MANAGEMENT
Chapter 10 File-System Interface
10.1 File Concept
373(9)
10.2 Access Methods
382(3)
10.3 Directory Structure
385(10)
10.4 File-System Mounting
395(2)
10.5 File Sharing
397(5)
10.6 Protection
402(5)
10.7 Summary
407(1)
Exercises
408(1)
Bibliographical Notes
409(2)
Chapter 11 File-System Implementation
11.1 File-System Structure
411(2)
11.2 File-System Implementation
413(6)
11.3 Directory Implementation
419(2)
11.4 Allocation Methods
421(8)
11.5 Free-Space Management
429(2)
11.6 Efficiency and Performance
431(4)
11.7 Recovery
435(2)
11.8 Log-Structured File Systems
437(1)
11.9 NFS
438(6)
11.10 Example: The WAFL File System
444(2)
11.11 Summary
446(1)
Exercises
447(2)
Bibliographical Notes
449(2)
Chanter 12 Mass-Storage Structure
12.1 Overview of Mass-Storage Structure
451(3)
12.2 Disk Structure
454(1)
12.3 Disk Attachment
455(1)
12.4 Disk Scheduling
456(6)
12.5 Disk Management
462(4)
12.6 Swap-Space Management
466(2)
12.7 RAID Structure
468(9)
12.8 Stable-Storage Implementation
477(1)
12.9 Tertiary-Storage Structure
478(10)
12.10 Summary
488(1)
Exercises
489(4)
Bibliographical Notes
493(2)
Chapter 13 I/O Systems
13.1 Overview
495(1)
13.2 I/O Hardware
496(9)
13.3 Application I/O Interface
505(6)
13.4 Kernel I/O Subsystem
511(7)
13.5 Transforming I/O Requests to Hardware Operations
518(2)
13.6 STREAMS
520(2)
13.7 Performance
522(3)
13.8 Summary
525(1)
Exercises
526(1)
Bibliographical Notes
527(4)
PART FIVE PROTECTION AND SECURITY
Chapter 14 Protection
14.1 Goals of Protection
531(1)
14.2 Principles of Protection
532(1)
14.3 Domain of Protection
533(5)
14.4 Access Matrix
538(4)
14.5 Implementation of Access Matrix
542(3)
14.6 Access Control
545(1)
14.7 Revocation of Access Rights
546(1)
14.8 Capability-Based Systems
547(3)
14.9 Language-Based Protection
550(5)
14.10 Summary
555(1)
Exercises
556(1)
Bibliographical Notes
557(2)
Chapter 15 Security
15.1 The Security Problem
559(4)
15.2 Program Threats
563(8)
15.3 System and Network Threats
571(5)
15.4 Cryptography as a Security Tool
576(11)
15.5 User Authentication
587(5)
15.6 Implementing Security Defenses
592(7)
15.7 Firewalling to Protect Systems and Networks
599(1)
15.8 Computer-Security Classifications
600(2)
15.9 An Example: Windows XP
602(2)
15.10 Summary
604(1)
Exercises
604(2)
Bibliographical Notes
606(5)
PART SIX DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS
Chapter 16 Distributed System Structures
16.1 Motivation
611(2)
16.2 Types of Distributed Operating Systems
613(4)
16.3 Network Structure
617(3)
16.4 Network Topology
620(2)
16.5 Communication Structure
622(6)
16.6 Communication Protocols
628(3)
16.7 Robustness
631(2)
16.8 Design Issues
633(3)
16.9 An Example: Networking
636(1)
16.10 Summary
637(1)
Exercises
638(2)
Bibliographical Notes
640(1)
Chapter 17 Distributed File Systems
17.1 Background
641(2)
17.2 Naming and Transparency
643(3)
17.3 Remote File Access
646(5)
17.4 Stateful Versus Stateless Service
651(1)
17.5 File Replication
652(2)
17.6 An Example: AFS
654(5)
17.7 Summary
659(1)
Exercises
660(1)
Bibliographical Notes
661(2)
Chapter 18 Distributed Coordination
18.1 Event Ordering
663(3)
18.2 Mutual Exclusion
666(3)
18.3 Atomicity
669(3)
18.4 Concurrency Control
672(4)
18.5 Deadlock Handling
676(7)
18.6 Election Algorithms
683(3)
18.7 Reaching Agreement
686(2)
18.8 Summary
688(1)
Exercises
689(1)
Bibliographical Notes
690(5)
PART SEVEN SPECIAL-PURPOSE SYSTEMS
Chapter 19 Real-Time Systems
19.1 Overview
695(1)
19.2 System Characteristics
696(2)
19.3 Features of Real-Time Kernels
698(2)
19.4 Implementing Real-Time Operating Systems
700(4)
19.5 Real-Time CPU Scheduling
704(6)
19.6 VxWorks 5.x
710(2)
19.7 Summary
712(1)
Exercises
713(1)
Bibliographical Notes
713(2)
Chapter 20 Multimedia Systems
20.1 What Is Multimedia?
715(3)
20.2 Compression
718(2)
20.3 Requirements of Multimedia Kernels
720(2)
20.4 CPU Scheduling
722(1)
20.5 Disk Scheduling
723(2)
20.6 Network Management
725(3)
20.7 An Example: CineBlitz
728(2)
20.8 Summary
730(1)
Exercises
731(2)
Bibliographical Notes
733(4)
PART EIGHT CASE STUDIES
Chapter 21 The Linux System
21.1 Linux History
737(5)
21.2 Design Principles
742(3)
21.3 Kernel Modules
745(3)
21.4 Process Management
748(3)
21.5 Scheduling
751(5)
21.6 Memory Management
756(8)
21.7 File Systems
764(6)
21.8 Input and Output
770(3)
21.9 Interprocess Communication
773(1)
21.10 Network Structure
774(3)
21.11 Security
777(2)
21.12 Summary
779(1)
Exercises
780(1)
Bibliographical Notes
781(2)
Chapter 22 Windows XP
22.1 History
783(2)
22.2 Design Principles
785(2)
22.3 System Components
787(24)
22.4 Environmental Subsystems
811(3)
22.5 File System
814(8)
22.6 Networking
822(7)
22.7 Programmer Interface
829(7)
22.8 Summary
836(1)
Exercises
836(1)
Bibliographical Notes
837(2)
Chapter 23 Influential Operating Systems
23.1. Early Systems
839(6)
23.2 Atlas
845(1)
23.3 XDS-940
846(1)
23.4 THE
847(1)
23.5 RC 4000
848(1)
23.6 CTSS
849(1)
23.7 MULTICS
849(1)
23.8 IBM OS/360
850(1)
23.9 Mach
851(2)
23.10 Other Systems
853(1)
Exercises
853(2)
Bibliography 855(30)
Credits 885(2)
Index 887


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