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Operating Systems : Internals and Design Principles,9780130319999
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Operating Systems : Internals and Design Principles

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130319999

ISBN10:
0130319996
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2001
Publisher(s):
PRENTICE HALL
List Price: $100.00
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Summary

For one-semester, introductory courses in Operating Systems in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, and Electrical Engineering programs. Blending up-to-date theory with broad coverage of fundamentals, this text offers a comprehensive treatment of operating systems, with an emphasis on internals and design issues. The book provides a thorough discussion of the fundamentals of operating systems design and relates these principles to contemporary design issues and to current trends in the development of operating systems. It helps students develop a solid understanding of the key structures and mechanisms of operating systems, the types of trade-offs and decisions involved in OS design, and the context within which the operating system functions (hardware, other system programs, application programs, interactive users).

Table of Contents

Web Site for Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles vi
Preface ix
Reader's Guide
1(6)
Outline of the Book
2(1)
Topic Ordering
3(1)
Internet and Web Resources
4(3)
PART ONE BACKGROUND 7(96)
Computer System Overview
9(44)
Basic Elements
10(1)
Processor Registers
11(3)
Instruction Execution
14(3)
Interrupts
17(11)
The Memory Hierarchy
28(3)
Cache Memory
31(4)
I/O Communication Techniques
35(3)
Recommended Reading
38(1)
Problems
39(14)
Appendix 1A Performance Characteristics of Two-Level Memory
41(7)
Appendix 1B Procedure Control
48(5)
Operating System Overview
53(50)
Operating System Objectives and Functions
54(4)
The Evolution of Operating Systems
58(10)
Major Achievements
68(12)
Characteristics of Modern Operating Systems
80(3)
Windows 2000 Overview
83(10)
Traditional UNIX Systems
93(3)
Modern UNIX Systems
96(4)
Recommended Reading
100(1)
Problems
101(2)
PART TWO PROCESSES 103(196)
Process Description and Control
107(46)
Process States
108(16)
Process Description
124(9)
Process Control
133(9)
UNIX SVR4 Process Management
142(5)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
147(1)
Recommended Reading
148(1)
Problems
149(4)
Threads, SMP, and Microkernels
153(44)
Processes and Threads
154(15)
Symmetric Multiprocessing
169(3)
Microkernels
172(7)
Windows 2000 Thread and SMP Management
179(5)
Solaris Thread and SMP Management
184(6)
Linux Process and Thread Management
190(2)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
192(1)
Recommended Reading
193(1)
Problems
194(3)
Concurrency: Mutual Exclusion and Synchronization
197(68)
Principles of Concurrency
199(9)
Mutual Exclusion: Software Approaches
208(4)
Mutual Exclusion: Hardware Support
212(5)
Semaphores
217(17)
Monitors
234(7)
Message Passing
241(7)
Readers/Writers Problem
248(5)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
253(1)
Recommended Reading
254(1)
Problems
255(10)
Concurrency: Deadlock and Starvation
265(34)
Principles of Deadlock
266(7)
Deadlock Prevention
273(2)
Deadlock Avoidance
275(5)
Deadlock Detection
280(2)
An Integrated Deadlock Strategy
282(1)
Dining Philosophers Problem
283(2)
UNIX Concurrency Mechanisms
285(2)
Solaris Thread Synchronization Primitives
287(4)
Windows 2000 Concurrency Mechanisms
291(2)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
293(1)
Recommended Reading
293(1)
Problems
294(5)
PART THREE MEMORY 299(92)
Memory Management
301(32)
Memory Management Requirements
302(3)
Memory Partitioning
305(12)
Paging
317(4)
Segmentation
321(2)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
323(1)
Recommended Reading
323(1)
Problems
324(9)
Appendix 7A Loading and Linking
325(8)
Virtual Memory
333(58)
Hardware and Control Structures
334(19)
Operating System Software
353(19)
UNIX and Solaris Memory Management
372(6)
Linux Memory Management
378(2)
Windows 2000 Memory Management
380(2)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
382(1)
Recommended Reading
383(1)
Problems
384(7)
Appendix 8A Hash Tables
387(4)
PART FOUR SCHEDULING 391(80)
Uniprocessor Scheduling
393(44)
Types of Scheduling
394(4)
Scheduling Algorithms
398(24)
Traditional UNIX Scheduling
422(2)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
424(1)
Recommended Reading
425(1)
Problems
426(11)
Appendix 9A Response Time
428(3)
Appendix 9B Queuing Systems
431(6)
Multiprocessor and Real-Time Scheduling
437(34)
Multiprocessor Scheduling
438(12)
Real-Time Scheduling
450(12)
Linux Scheduling
462(1)
UNIX SVR4 Scheduling
463(2)
Windows 2000 Scheduling
465(3)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
468(1)
Recommended Reading
469(1)
Problems
469(2)
PART FIVE INPUT/OUTPUT AND FILES 471(94)
I/O Management and Disk Scheduling
473(52)
I/O Devices
474(1)
Organization of the I/O Function
475(5)
Operating System Design Issues
480(3)
I/O Buffering
483(3)
Disk Scheduling
486(7)
RAID
493(9)
Disk Cache
502(4)
UNIX SVR4 I/O
506(3)
Windows 2000 I/O
509(2)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
511(2)
Recommended Reading
513(1)
Problems
514(11)
Appendix 11A Disk Storage Devices
515(10)
File Management
525(40)
Overview
526(5)
File Organization
531(5)
File Directories
536(3)
File Sharing
539(2)
Record Blocking
541(2)
Secondary Storage Management
543(9)
UNIX File Management
552(2)
Windows 2000 File System
554(6)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
560(1)
Recommended Reading
561(1)
Problems
562(3)
PART SIX DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS 565(80)
Distributed Processing, Client/Server, and Clusters
569(38)
Client/Server Computing
571(12)
Distributed Message Passing
583(3)
Remote Procedure Calls
586(4)
Clusters
590(6)
Windows 2000 Cluster Server
596(2)
Sun Cluster
598(3)
Beowulf and Linux Clusters
601(2)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
603(1)
Recommended Reading
604(1)
Problems
605(2)
Distributed Process Management
607(38)
Process Migration
608(7)
Distributed Global States
615(5)
Distributed Mutual Exclusion
620(11)
Distributed Deadlock
631(12)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
643(1)
Recommended Reading
643(1)
Problems
644(1)
PART SEVEN SECURITY 645(98)
Computer Security
647(96)
Security Threats
648(5)
Protection
653(4)
Intruders
657(12)
Malicious Software
669(10)
Trusted Systems
679(4)
Windows 2000 Security
683(4)
Summary, Key Terms, and Review Questions
687(2)
Recommended Reading
689(1)
Problems
690(9)
Appendix 15A Encryption
691(8)
APPENDICES
Appendix A TCP/IP
699(10)
A.1 The Need for a Protocol Architecture
699(1)
A.2 The TCP/IP Protocol Architecture
700(9)
Appendix B Object-Oriented Design
709(10)
B.1 Motivation
709(1)
B.2 Object-Oriented Concepts
709(5)
B.3 Benefits of Object-Oriented Design
714(1)
B.4 CORBA
715(4)
Appendix C Programming and Operating System Projects
719(4)
C.1 Projects for Teaching Operating Systems
719(1)
C.2 Nachos
720(1)
C.3 Research Projects
721(1)
C.4 Programming Projects
722(1)
C.5 Reading/Report Assignments
722(1)
Appendix D OSP: An Environment for Operating System Projects
723(8)
D.1 Overview
723(3)
D.2 Innovative Aspects of OSP
726(2)
D.3 Comparison with Other Operating System Courseware
728(1)
D.4 The OSP Software Distribution
729(1)
D.5 OSP Mailing List
729(1)
D.6 Future Plans
730(1)
Appendix E BACI: The Ben-Ari Concurrent Programming System
731(12)
E.1 Introduction
731(1)
E.2 BACI
732(3)
E.3 Examples of BACI Programs
735(4)
E.4 BACI Projects
739(3)
E.5 Enhancements to the BACI System
742(1)
Glossary 743(14)
References 757(14)
Index 771


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