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Operating Systems : Internals and Design Principles,9780138874070

Operating Systems : Internals and Design Principles

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780138874070

ISBN10:
0138874077
Media:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/1998
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $87.33

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Summary

This text is suitable for the first undergraduate through graduate operating systems course found in computer science and computer engineering departments. Winner of the 1998 Texty Award for the best Computer Science and Engineering Textbook, which is given by the Text and Academic Authors Association! Blending up-to-date theory with modern applications, this book offers a comprehensive treatment of operating systems with an emphasis on internals and design issues.

Table of Contents

Preface v
PART ONE BACKGROUND 1(98)
Chapter 1 Computer System Overview
3(42)
1.1 Basic Elements
3(1)
1.2 Processor Registers
4(3)
1.3 Instruction Execution
7(3)
1.4 Interrupts
10(11)
1.5 The Memory Hierarchy
21(3)
1.6 Cache Memory
24(4)
1.7 I/O Communication Techniques
28(3)
1.8 Recommended Reading
31(1)
1.9 Problems
32(2)
Appendix 1A Performance Characteristics of Two-Level Memory
34(7)
Appendix 1B Procedure Control
41(4)
Chapter 2 Operating System Overview
45(54)
2.1 Operating System Objectives and Functions
45(5)
2.2 The Evolution of Operating Systems
50(10)
2.3 Major Achievements
60(11)
2.4 Characteristics of Modern Operating Systems
71(3)
2.5 Windows NT Overview
74(11)
2.6 Traditional UNIX Systems
85(3)
2.7 Modern UNIX Systems
88(2)
2.8 Outline of the Remainder of the Book
90(4)
2.9 Recommended Reading
94(1)
2.10 Problems
95(4)
PART TWO PROCESSES 99(188)
Chapter 3 Process Description And Control
101(44)
3.1 Process States
102(15)
3.2 Process Description
117(10)
3.3 Process Control
127(8)
3.4 UNIX SVR4 Process Management
135(5)
3.5 Summary
140(1)
3.6 Recommended Reading
141(1)
3.7 Problems
141(4)
Chapter 4 Threads, SMP, and Microkernels
145(42)
4.1 Processes and Threads
145(15)
4.2 Symmetric Multiprocessing (SMP)
160(3)
4.3 Microkernels
163(7)
4.4 Solaris Thread and SMP Management
170(6)
4.5 Windows NT Thread and SMP Management
176(6)
4.6 Summary
182(1)
4.7 Recommended Reading
183(1)
4.8 Problems
183(4)
Chapter 5 Concurrency: Mutual Exclusion and Synchronization
187(66)
5.1 Principles of Concurrency
188(9)
5.2 Mutual Exclusion: Software Approaches
197(7)
5.3 Mutual Exclusion: Hardware Support
204(4)
5.4 Semaphores
208(14)
5.5 Monitors
222(8)
5.6 Message Passing
230(7)
5.7 Readers/Writers Problem
237(5)
5.8 Summary
242(1)
5.9 Recommended Reading
242(1)
5.10 Problems
243(10)
Chapter 6 Concurrency: Deadlock And Starvation
253(34)
6.1 Principles of Deadlock
253(7)
6.2 Deadlock Prevention
260(2)
6.3 Deadlock Avoidance
262(4)
6.4 Deadlock Detection
266(3)
6.5 An Integrated Deadlock Strategy
269(1)
6.6 Dining Philosophers Problem
270(1)
6.7 UNIX Concurrency Mechanisms
271(4)
6.8 Solaris Thread Synchronization Primitives
275(3)
6.9 Windows NT Concurrency Mechanisms
278(1)
6.10 Summary
279(2)
6.11 Recommended Reading
281(1)
6.12 Problems
281(6)
PART THREE MEMORY 287(90)
Chapter 7 Memory Management
289(30)
7.1 Memory Management Requirements
289(3)
7.2 Memory Partitioning
292(12)
7.3 Paging
304(3)
7.4 Segmentation
307(2)
7.5 Summary
309(1)
7.6 Recommended Reading
309(1)
7.7 Problems
310(1)
Appendix 7A Loading and Linking
311(8)
Chapter 8 Virtual Memory
319(58)
8.1 Hardware and Control Structures
320(19)
8.2 Operating System Software
339(21)
8.3 UNIX and Solaris Memory Management
360(5)
8.4 Windows NT Memory Management
365(3)
8.5 Summary
368(1)
8.6 Recommended Reading
369(1)
8.7 Problems
369(3)
Appendix 8A Hash Tables
372(5)
PART FOUR SCHEDULING 377(72)
Chapter 9 Uniprocessor Scheduling
379(38)
9.1 Types of Scheduling
380(4)
9.2 Scheduling Algorithms
384(22)
9.3 Traditional UNIX Scheduling
406(2)
9.4 Summary
408(1)
9.5 Recommended Reading
409(1)
9.6 Problems
409(4)
Appendix 9A Response Time
413(4)
Chapter 10 Multiprocessor and Real-Time Scheduling
417(32)
10.1 Multiprocessor Scheduling
417(12)
10.2 Real-Time Scheduling
429(13)
10.3 UNIX SVR4 Scheduling
442(2)
10.4 Windows NT Scheduling
444(2)
10.5 Summary
446(1)
10.6 Recommended Reading
447(1)
10.7 Problems
447(2)
PART FIVE INPUT/OUTPUT AND FILES 449(90)
Chapter 11 I/O Management and Disk Scheduling
451(50)
11.1 I/O Devices
451(2)
11.2 Organization of the I/O Function
453(3)
11.3 Operating System Design Issues
456(4)
11.4 I/O Buffering
460(3)
11.5 Disk Scheduling
463(8)
11.6 RAID
471(8)
11.7 Disk Cache
479(3)
11.8 UNIX SVR4 I/O
482(4)
11.9 Windows NT I/O
486(2)
11.10 Summary
488(1)
11.11 Recommended Reading
489(1)
11.12 Problems
490(2)
Appendix 11A Disk Storage Devices
492(9)
Chapter 12 File Management
501(38)
12.1 Overview
501(6)
12.2 File Organization
507(5)
12.3 File Directories
512(3)
12.4 File Sharing
515(3)
12.5 Record Blocking
518(61)
12.6 Secondary Storage Management
579
12.7 UNIX File Management
527(2)
12.8 Windows NT File System
529(6)
12.9 Summary
535(1)
12.10 Recommended Reading
535(4)
12.11 Problems
539(1)
PART SIX DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS 539(84)
Chapter 13 Distributed Processing, Client/Server, and Clusters
543(42)
13.1 The Need for a Protocol Architecture
544(1)
13.2 The TCP/IP Protocol Suite
545(8)
13.3 The OSI Protocol Architecture
553(1)
13.4 Client/Server Computing
553(12)
13.5 Distributed Message Passing
565(4)
13.6 Remote Procedure Calls
569(4)
13.7 Clusters
573(4)
13.8 Windows NT Wolfpack
577(2)
13.9 Solaris MC
579(3)
13.10 Summary
582(1)
13.11 Recommended Reading
583(1)
13.12 Problems
583(2)
Chapter 14 Distributed Process Management
585(38)
14.1 Process Migration
585(7)
14.2 Distributed Global States
592(5)
14.3 Distributed Mutual Exclusion
597(10)
14.4 Distributed Deadlock
607(13)
14.5 Summary
620(1)
14.6 Recommended Reading
620(1)
14.7 Problems
621(2)
PART SEVEN SECURITY 623(60)
Chapter 15 Security
625(58)
15.1 Security Threats
626(6)
15.2 Protection
632(4)
15.3 Intruders
636(14)
15.4 Viruses and Related Threats
650(8)
15.5 Trusted Systems
658(2)
15.6 Network Security
660(8)
15.7 Windows NT Security
668(6)
15.8 Summary
674(1)
15.9 Recommended Reading
675(1)
15.10 Problems
675(2)
Appendix 15A Encryption
677(6)
APPENDICES
683(60)
Appendix A Queuing Analysis
683(26)
A.1 Why Queuing Analysis?
684(2)
A.2 Queuing Models
686(5)
A.3 Single-Server Queues
691(3)
A.4 Multiserver Queues
694(1)
A.5 Networks of Queues
695(4)
A.6 Examples
699(3)
A.7 Other Queuing Models
702(1)
A.8 Recommended Reading
702(1)
Annex A Just Enough Probability and Statistics
703(6)
Appendix B Object-Oriented Design
709(10)
B.1 Motivation
709(1)
B.2 Object-Oriented Concepts
709(5)
B.3 Benefits of Object-Oriented Design
714(1)
B.4 CORBA
715(2)
B.5 Recommended Reading
717(2)
Appendix C Programming and Operating System Projects
719(4)
C.1 Projects for Teaching Operating Systems
719(1)
C.2 NACHOS
720(1)
C.3 Programming Projects
721(1)
C.4 Reading/Report Assignments
722(1)
Appendix D OSP: An Environment for Operating System Projects
723(8)
D.1 Overview
723(3)
D.2 Innovative Aspects of OSP
726(2)
D.3 Comparison with Other Operating System Courseware
728(1)
D.4 The OSP Software Distribution
729(1)
D.5 OSP Mailing List
729(1)
D.6 Future Plans
730(1)
Appendix E BACI: The Ben-Ari Concurrent Programming System
731(12)
E.1 Introduction
731(1)
E.2 BACI
732(3)
E.3 Examples of BACI Programs
735(4)
E.4 BACI Projects
739(3)
E.5 Enhancements to the BACI System
742(1)
Glossary 743(10)
References 753(17)
Index 770


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