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Ordeal by Fire : The Civil War and Reconstruction,9780070458420
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Ordeal by Fire : The Civil War and Reconstruction

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780070458420

ISBN10:
0070458421
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
9/1/1991
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill College
List Price: $80.60
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Summary

Written by a leading Civil War historian and Pulitzer Prize winner, this text describes the social, economic, political, and ideological conflicts that led to a unique, tragic, and transitional event in American history. The third edition incorporates recent scholarship and addresses renewed areas of interest in the Civil War/Reconstruction era including the motivations and experiences of common soldiers and the role of women in the war effort.

Table of Contents

Preface to the Second Edition xvii(2)
Preface to the First Edition xix
Prologue: The Setting of Conflict 1(2)
PART ONE The Coming of War 3(148)
ONE American Modernization, 1800-1860
5(21)
Changes in the Economy
5(6)
Causes of American Modernization
11(2)
The Modernizing Ethos
13(2)
Modernization and Reform
15(6)
Modernization and Social Tensions
21(2)
Political Parties and Modernization
23(3)
TWO The Antebellum South
26(16)
The Southern Economy
26(8)
Slavery in the American South
34(8)
THREE The Ideological Conflict over Slavery
42(15)
The Antislavery Movement
42(5)
Antislavery and Modernization
47(2)
The Proslavery Counterattack
49(3)
The Cavalier Image
52(3)
Slavery and National Politics
55(2)
FOUR Texas, Mexico, and the Compromise of 1850
57(18)
The Annexation of Texas
57(2)
Manifest Destiny and the Mexican War
59(3)
The Wilmot Proviso
62(3)
The Election of 1848
65(2)
The Compromise of 1850
67(6)
The Election of 1852
73(2)
FIVE Filibusterers, Fugitives, and Nativists
75(15)
Manifest Destiny and Slavery in the 1850s
75(4)
The Fugitive Slave Law
79(5)
Free Soilers and Free Blacks
84(2)
Nativism and the Rise of the Know-Nothings
86(4)
SIX Kansas and the Rise of the Republican Party
90(12)
The Kansas-Nebraska Act
90(3)
The Rise of the Republican Party
93(2)
Bleeding Kansas
95(4)
The Election of 1856
99(3)
SEVEN The Deepening Crisis, 1857-1859
102(15)
The Dred Scott Decision
102(5)
The Lecompton Constitution
107(2)
The Lincoln-Douglas Debates
109(3)
Portents of Armageddon, 1858-1859
112(5)
EIGHT The Critical Year, 1859-1860
117(14)
John Brown and the Harpers Ferry Raid
117(4)
The Democratic Party Breaks in Two
121(1)
The Republicans Nominate Lincoln
122(2)
The Campaign
124(5)
The Outcome
129(2)
NINE Secession and the Coming of War
131(20)
Secession of the Lower South
131(2)
Secession: Revolution or Counterrevolution?
133(4)
The Northern Response to Secession
137(4)
Launching the Confederacy
141(1)
The Upper South
142(1)
Lincoln Takes the Helm
143(1)
Fort Sumter and the End of Peace
144(7)
PART TWO The Civil War 151(338)
TEN A Brothers' War: The Upper South
153(14)
The Conflict Takes Shape
153(2)
The First Clashes
155(1)
The Eastern Border States: Maryland and Delaware
156(1)
The Western Border States: Kentucky and Missouri
157(5)
West Virginia
162(3)
East Tennessee
165(2)
ELEVEN Mobilizing for War
167(16)
Organizing the Armed Forces
167(10)
The Navies and the Blockade
177(6)
TWELVE The Balance Sheet of War
183(25)
Manpower and Resources
184(2)
Confederate Advantages
186(5)
Confederate Guerrillas
191(2)
Men and Arms
193(8)
Financing the War: The Confederacy
201(2)
Financing the War: The Union
203(5)
THIRTEEN The War at Home and Abroad
208(14)
The First Battle of Bull Run
208(5)
McClellan and the Army of the Potomac
213(4)
Europe and the War
217(1)
The King Cotton Illusion
218(1)
The Blockade and Foreign Relations
219(2)
The Trent Affair
221(1)
FOURTEEN The Springtime of Northern Hope
222(13)
Forts Henry and Donelson
223(3)
The Battle of Shiloh
226(4)
Other Union Triumphs in the West
230(5)
FIFTEEN Jackson and Lee Strike Back
235(25)
The Peninsula and Valley Campaigns in Virginia
235(8)
The Seven Days Battles
243(7)
The Union Army and Total War
250(4)
The Second Battle of Bull Run
254(6)
SIXTEEN Slavery and the War: Northern Politics, 1861-1862
260(19)
War Aims and Politics in the North
260(4)
The Slavery Issue
264(7)
The Copperheads
271(3)
The Union Army and Emancipation
274(1)
Colonization of Freed Slaves
275(2)
Lincoln's Circumlocution on Emancipation, August-September 1862
277(2)
SEVENTEEN The First Turning Point: Antietam and Emancipation
279(23)
The Battle of Antietam
279(8)
The Confederate Invasion of Kentucky
287(3)
The Battles of Iuka and Corinth
290(2)
The Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation
292(1)
Lincoln and Civil Liberties
292(2)
The Elections of 1862 in the North
294(3)
The Removal of McClellan and Buell from Command
297(3)
Europe and the War, 1862
300(2)
EIGHTEEN The Winter of Northern Discontent
302(20)
The Battle of Fredericksburg
302(1)
A Crisis of Confidence in the North
303(3)
The War in the West: The Battle of Stones River
306(3)
The War in the West: Vicksburg
309(6)
Joe Hooker and the "Finest Army on the Planet"
315(3)
The Battle of Chancellorsville
318(4)
NINETEEN The Second Turning Point: Gettysburg, Vicksburg, and Chattanooga
322(21)
The Gettysburg Campaign
322(2)
The Battle of Gettysburg
324(6)
Union Victories in the West
330(4)
The Battle of Chickamauga
334(2)
The Battles of Chattanooga
336(4)
The War and Foreign Policy, 1863
340(3)
TWENTY War Issues and Politics in 1863
343(25)
Vallandigham and the Copperhead Drive for Power
343(3)
Black Men in Blue
346(7)
Conscription in the North
353(2)
A Socioeconomic Profile of Civil War Soldiers
355(2)
Draft Resistance and Riots in the North
357(1)
Emancipation Confirmed
358(2)
Political Disaffection within the Confederacy
360(4)
Habeas Corpus and States' Rights in the Confederacy
364(1)
Opposition Leaders
364(1)
The Disadvantages of No-Party Politics
365(3)
TWENTY-ONE Behind the Lines
368(25)
The Economic Impact of the War in the North
368(8)
Economic Discontent in the South
376(4)
Trading with the Enemy
380(5)
Disease and Medical Care in Civil War Armies
385(6)
Women and Medical Care
391(2)
TWENTY-TWO Wartime Reconstruction and the Freedpeople
393(17)
Emancipation
394(2)
The Status of the Freedpeople
396(7)
Political Reconstruction
403(5)
Reconstruction and Presidential Politics
408(2)
TWENTY-THREE Military Stalemate, 1864
410(26)
Union Military Strategy in 1864
411(2)
Failure of the Auxiliary Campaigns
413(1)
The Wilderness and Spotsylvania
414(6)
From Spotsylvania to Cold Harbor
420(3)
The Shenandoah Valley and Petersburg
423(6)
The Atlanta Campaign, May-July 1864
429(7)
TWENTY-FOUR The Third Turning Point: The Election of 1864
436(23)
Peace Feelers
436(4)
The Democrats Nominate McClellan
440(1)
Mobile Bay
441(1)
The Fall of Atlanta
442(1)
Sheridan in the Valley
443(3)
The Copperhead Issue in the 1864 Election
446(3)
The Prisoners of War Issue
449(7)
The Reelection of Lincoln
456(3)
TWENTY-FIVE The End of the Confederacy
459(30)
From Atlanta to the Sea
459(4)
The Battles of Franklin and Nashville
463(3)
Adoption of the Thirteenth Amendment
466(1)
Desertion from the Confederate Armies
467(1)
The Fall of Fort Fisher and the Failure of Peace Negotiations
468(3)
Sherman's March through the Carolinas
471(4)
Destruction of Confederate Resources
475(1)
The Reconstruction Issue in the Winter of 1864-1865
476(1)
The Confederate Decision to Arm Slaves
477(1)
From Petersburg to Appomattox
478(4)
The Assassination of Lincoln and the End of the War
482(5)
The Imprint of War
487(2)
PART THREE Reconstruction 489(118)
TWENTY-SIX The Problems of Peace
491(19)
The Aftermath of War
491(5)
Presidential Reconstruction, 1865
496(7)
Land and Labor in the Postwar South
503(7)
TWENTY-SEVEN The Origins of "Radical" Reconstruction
510(11)
The Schism between President and Congress
510(3)
The Fourteenth Amendment
513(2)
The Election of 1866
515(2)
The Reconstruction Acts of 1867
517(4)
TWENTY-EIGHT Reconstruction and the Crisis of Impeachment
521(14)
Johnson's Continued Defiance of Congress
521(5)
The Impeachment and Acquittal of Johnson
526(3)
The Supreme Court and Reconstruction
529(1)
Readmission of Southern States
530(5)
TWENTY-NINE The First Grant Administration
535(13)
The Election of 1868
535(5)
The Fifteenth Amendment
540(1)
Grant in the White House
541(4)
Civil Service Reform
545(3)
THIRTY The Southern Question, 1869-1872
548(18)
Southern Republicans: Blacks, Carpetbaggers, and Scalawags
548(5)
Southern Republicans in Power
553(3)
The Klan Issue
556(4)
The Election of 1872
560(6)
THIRTY-ONE Social and Economic Reconstruction
566(15)
Education in the South
566(4)
The New Order in Southern Agriculture
570(6)
Postwar Commercial and Industrial Developments
576(5)
THIRTY-TWO The Retreat from Reconstruction
581(14)
Reconstruction Unravels, 1873-1876
581(6)
The Election of 1876
587(3)
The Compromise of 1877
590(5)
THIRTY-THREE The New South
595(12)
The Persistence of the Southern Question
595(4)
Ideology and Reality in the New South
599(6)
Farewell to the Bloody Shirt
605(2)
Epilogue 607(3)
Glossary 610(3)
Appendix 613(20)
United States and Confederate States Constitutions 613(2)
Jefferson Davis's Inaugural Address 615(3)
Abraham Lincoln's Inaugural Address 618(6)
Speech by Confederate Vice President Alexander H. Stephens in Savannah 624(1)
Proclamation Calling Militia and Convening Congress 625(1)
The Emancipation Proclamation 626(1)
The Gettysburg Address 627(1)
Proclamation of Amnesty and Reconstruction 628(2)
Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address 630(1)
The Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution 631(2)
Bibliography 633(52)
Index 685


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