9780136388838

Orientation to the Theater

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780136388838

  • ISBN10:

    0136388833

  • Edition: 5th
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1991-10-01
  • Publisher: Pearson
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Summary

A widely-used, highly acclaimed, and fully illustrated introduction to all aspects of the theatre.

Table of Contents

Preface vii
The Background
1(27)
You and the Theater
2(10)
Histrionic Sensibility
3(3)
Empathy
6(1)
Appeal of the Theater
7(5)
Thespis
12(1)
An Easter Trope
13(2)
Hamlet's ``Mousetrap''
15(2)
Dramatic Action
17(7)
Theater as an Art
24(1)
Theatrical Conventions
24(4)
Plays to Read and See
27(1)
Bibliography
27(1)
Notes
27(1)
The Play and Its Parts
28(41)
Plot
30(13)
Conflict
30(2)
Exposition
32(2)
Discovery
34(3)
Point of Attack
37(1)
Foreshadowing
38(2)
Reversal
40(1)
Climax
40(2)
Denouement
42(1)
Character
43(9)
Thought
52(4)
Diction
56(5)
Music
61(4)
Spectacle
65(2)
Plays to Read and See
67(1)
Bibliography
67(1)
Notes
67(2)
Tragedy
69(22)
The Nature of Tragedy
70(3)
Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy
71(2)
Plot
73(1)
The Tragic Hero
74(2)
Diction
76(1)
Aesthetic Pleasure
77(1)
Catharsis
77(2)
A Positive Statement
79(1)
Honesty
80(1)
Significant Content
80(2)
Modern Tragedy
82(9)
Plays to Read and See
88(1)
Bibliography
89(1)
Notes
89(2)
Melodrama
91(21)
Plot
95(3)
Character
98(1)
Thought
99(1)
Diction
100(1)
Music
101(1)
Spectacle
102(3)
Melodrama and Film
105(1)
Melodramatic Musicals
106(2)
Drame
108(4)
Plays to See
110(1)
Bibliography
110(1)
Notes
111(1)
Comedy
112(41)
The Nature of Comedy
114(1)
The Comic Attitude
115(1)
Kinds of Comedy
116(8)
Dark Comedy
121(3)
Sources of Laughter
124(11)
Derision
125(2)
Incongruity
127(4)
Automatism
131(4)
Plot
135(3)
Comic Mechanisms
138(4)
Teasing
138(3)
Reversal
141(1)
Character
142(1)
Thought
143(2)
Diction
145(2)
Music
147(1)
Comedy in Performance
147(6)
Plays to Read and See
151(1)
Bibliography
151(1)
Notes
152(1)
Traditional Modes
153(28)
Classicism
154(3)
Aeschylus
157(1)
Sophocles
157(1)
Euripedes
157(1)
Classic Comedy: Aristophanes
157(2)
Roman Drama
159(1)
Plautus
159(1)
Terence
160(1)
Seneca
160(1)
French Neoclassicism
160(3)
Corneille
161(1)
Racine
162(1)
Moliere
163(1)
English Neoclassicism
163(6)
The Elizabethans
164(2)
Shakespeare's Contemporaries
166(1)
Shakespeare's Plays
167(1)
Hamlet
168(1)
German Romanticism
169(2)
Goethe
169(1)
Schiller
170(1)
English Romanticism
171(2)
French Romanticism
173(8)
Rostand
173(4)
Hugo
177(2)
Plays to Read and See
179(1)
Bibliography
179(1)
Notes
180(1)
Realism
181(29)
The Realist Movement
185(12)
Observation and Objectivity
189(1)
Plot
189(1)
Character
190(3)
Thought
193(1)
Diction
193(3)
Spectacle
196(1)
Naturalism
197(5)
Expressionism
202(8)
Plays to Read and See
208(1)
Bibliography
209(1)
Notes
209(1)
Theatricalism and the New Theater
210(37)
Theatricalism
211(16)
Dadaism
214(1)
Schwitters and College
214(3)
Vakhtangov and Meyerhold
217(3)
Brecht
220(5)
Artaud
225(2)
The Absurdists
227(10)
Jean Genet
223(11)
Peter Brook
234(2)
Jerzy Grotowski
236(1)
The New Theater
237(2)
The Living Theater
238(1)
The Open Theater
238(1)
The Performance Group
238(1)
Other New Theater Groups
239(1)
The San Francisco Mime Troupe
240(1)
El Teatro Campesino
240(1)
The Theater of Images
240(4)
Robert Wilson
241(1)
Richard Foreman
242(1)
The Mabou Mines Company
243(1)
Performance Art
244(3)
Plays to Read and See
245(1)
Bibliography
245(1)
Notes
246(1)
The Director
247(29)
The Modern Director Appears
250(1)
The Functions of the Director
251(1)
The Director at Work
252(4)
The Director as an Interpreter
256(20)
Peter Brook
262(3)
Joan Littlewood
265(1)
Three Romanian Directors
266(2)
Ariane Mnouchkine
268(2)
Peter Stein
270(1)
Bertolt Brecht
270(2)
Others in the New Theater
272(2)
Plays to Read and See
274(1)
Films and Videotapes on Directing
274(1)
Bibliography
274(1)
Notes
275(1)
The Actor
276(32)
The Actor's Contribution
279(2)
Requisites of the Actor
281(4)
Evolution of Modern Acting
285(7)
The Stanislavski Method of Acting
287(4)
Lee Strasberg and the Actors' Studio
291(1)
The Actor's Ways of Working
292(8)
Rehearsals
298(1)
Improvisation
299(1)
Acting in the New Theater
300(4)
Film Acting
304(4)
Plays to Read and See
305(1)
Bibliography
306(1)
Notes
306(2)
The Designer
308(36)
The Pictorial Tradition
309(8)
Gordon Craig
312(1)
Adolphe Appia
313(3)
Meyerhold and Constructivism
316(1)
Epic Theater
317(1)
Stage Scenery
318(2)
The Scene Designer at Work
320(7)
Contemporary Scene Design
327(13)
The Lighting Designer
340(1)
The Costume Designer
340(4)
Films to See for Outstanding Design
342(1)
Bibliography
342(1)
Notes
342(2)
Theater Architecture
344(28)
The Greek Theater
345(2)
The Medieval Theater
347(2)
The Elizabethan Theater
349(2)
Proscenium Arch Theater
351(4)
Development of the Modern Theater
355(4)
The Space Stage
359(1)
The Thrust Stage
360(2)
Theater-in-the-Round
362(1)
College and University Theaters
363(1)
Flexible and Multiple Theaters
364(1)
Artaud's Theater
365(2)
Theater Architecture Revised
367(2)
Found Spaces
369(3)
Films and Videotapes on Theater Architecture
370(1)
Bibliography
371(1)
Notes
371(1)
The Audience
372(20)
The Nature of Attention
374(1)
The Audience as a Crowd
375(2)
Types of Audiences
377(10)
The Greek Audience
378(1)
The Elizabethan Audience
379(2)
The Restoration Audience
381(1)
The Modern Audience
382(5)
Opportunities for the Audience
387(5)
Bibliography
391(1)
Notes
391(1)
Playwriting
392(20)
A Brief History of Playwriting
393(2)
Restrictions of Playwriting
395(1)
Creating a Play
396(16)
Henrik Ibsen
398(2)
Eugene O'Neill
400(1)
Arthur Miller
401(1)
Friedrich Duerrenmatt
402(5)
Peter Shaffer
407(1)
August Wilson
408(2)
Plays to Read and See
410(1)
Bibliography
410(1)
Notes
410(2)
General Bibliography 412(1)
Glossary 413(4)
Acknowledgments 417(2)
Index 419

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